#1
Hi, new poster. Just about to finish my job and going to University in september. I'm going to buy a Synyster Gates Custom s, however, the finish I want has gold hardware, which I've heard fades easily. I have taken good care of my current Squire Strat, which is great condition. So to Gold hardware or not?

Secondly, I will need a new amp. What are some good Amps for say £100/$160?
#2
Gold hardware doesn't "fade." It wears off. The gold plating is SO thin that it wears through fairly quickly.
Wax it. No, seriously, put a good coat of carnauba wax on it and renew it now and again when you change strings. That'll help it last a lot longer.

This is a mid-70's L5S that I've had for a very long time. You can see some wear on the upper tailpiece post and not a lot (well, it's there, but not very visible) elsewhere.

One more thing; you can actually take the hardware to a plating company and have them re-plate it with a thicker layer of gold. The gold plating used on guitar hardware is so thin because the hardware is extremely cheap (not what YOU pay, but what the manufacturer pays). The other option is to simply buy backup hardware that you can throw on the guitar when the original stuff gets crappy looking. I've done neither with the below guitar; it's all original. Obviously the high wear areas are going to be the pickup covers, bridge and tailpiece, followed by the tuners.



Keep sweat OFF gold hardware -- it will actually work its way under the gold plating via "micro holes" in the plating. Once through sweat, salt and oils will begin to work on the plating bits UNDER the gold (nickel and copper) causing those metals to corrode (gold doesn't tarnish, doesn't oxidize, doesn't corrode) and bubble. That will cause the gold above them to flake off. Yet another reason to WAX (did I mention this) your gold hardware. It also works very well on your finish...
Last edited by dspellman at Aug 20, 2016,
#4
Nice axe, dspellman!

Related tangent: same issues with chrome?
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#6
Thanks!
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#7
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Nice axe, dspellman!


yep very nice
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#8
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Nice axe, dspellman!

Related tangent: same issues with chrome?


Some, but less. Chrome doesn't wear anywhere near as easily as gold, but it is subject to issues with sweat and acids getting into microholes in the plating. You've no doubt seen the odd chrome bit bubbled and/or flaking. That usually means that corrosion is forming under the chrome. I still wax it.

Chrome is generally the last plating stage after nickel and copper. Nickel is far more susceptible to corrosion than chrome, copper more than nickel. Pitting corrosion (through nearly invisible holes in the surface) can produce relatively huge areas of corrosion while the surface still looks pretty good. And then the whole thing gives way.

Nitrocellulose paint (lacquer) and plastic products (tuner buttons, pickguards, inlays) degrade by outgassing sulfuric acid and nitric acid fumes, which corrode metals quickly. Yet another reason to NOT have nitrocellulose on a guitar.
#9
Good to know. My guitars don't show much metal corrosion at least in part because my hands sweat a LOT less than normal. But the info still matters.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#10
i dunno what type of plastics they use in guitars, but if wikipedia is correct, nitrocellulose doesn't seem to have any sulphur in it. EDIT: but yeah i wouldn't be surprised if nitric acid is released from nitrocellulose there, it pretty much has a bunch of no3 groups on it which are just asking to jump off it.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Aug 22, 2016,
#11
Quote by Dave_Mc
i dunno what type of plastics they use in guitars, but if wikipedia is correct, nitrocellulose doesn't seem to have any sulphur in it. EDIT: but yeah i wouldn't be surprised if nitric acid is released from nitrocellulose there, it pretty much has a bunch of no3 groups on it which are just asking to jump off it.


Nitrocellulose is cellulose (cotton, wood pulp) that's been nitrated (nitric acid) in the presence of sulfuric acid as a catalyst.
Nitrocellulose is one of the first plastics, used to make knobs, pool balls, etc., etc. and tuner buttons and faux tortoise-shell pickguards and "pearloid" inlays. In essence, a nitrocellulose lacquer (nitrocellulose thinned with acetone, usually, and other solvents) is a plastic finish.
When it decays, it embrittles, outgasses, checks, chips and gets chalky. It was extensively used as a car paint through the fifties, and turned a lot of coral pink cars into "salmon" finishes as it yellowed (thanks to the acids).

#12
yeah. i was just wondering where the sulphuric acid would come from. it says on wikipedia that it's washed with water to remove the acids, so i'm guessing there wouldn't be any left, but
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#13
Quote by Dave_Mc
yeah. i was just wondering where the sulphuric acid would come from. it says on wikipedia that it's washed with water to remove the acids, so i'm guessing there wouldn't be any left, but


I've made nitrocellulose before, both as gun cotton and as magician-type flash paper, and the nitric acid as residual nitric acid mostly comes off, but the sulfuric doesn't all come away. When the nitrocellulose breaks down, those acids are once again present (nitric is higher concentration, of course). Sometimes you wonder why your frets turn green and a bit scratchy? This often happens to a Gibson that's been sitting in the case too long, even if it seems pretty darned clean.
#14
ah right, thanks yeah that makes sense if the sulphuric acid is hard to get rid of.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#15
I always avoided gold hardware mainly because it typically looks bad on used guitars so I have been leary of it. I don't sweat as much as most of the other guitar players that I know so corrosion has never been a major factor for me I always wipe down and clean my hardware after a couple of uses (every use for the bridge). I have not tried wax but I am going to now.

For me Ibanez's cosmo black finish is the worst finish it seems to be the least durable compared to chrome, gold, or black.
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#16
Yep gold hard wear will be gold and silver hard wear in a short space of time.My Sheraton is doing it already and it's only a 2012