#1
Hi all,

So almost 2 years ago exactly was when i first picked up a guitar and started to learn the ways of it. Started with acoustic guitar and also went to a couple of lessons with a teacher and practiced at home with lessons from youtube.

I noticed i developed more and had more fun playing at home and looking up stuff on youtube so i decided to stop going to the teacher and i went solo and started playing electric guitar instead.

So today 2 years later i know the open chords and can switch between them like there is no problem. Some of the bar chords ive also learned.
Power chords is something i play daily.
Ive practiced alternate picking and economy picking. I know how to read a tab and to do stuff like hammer-on and pull-offs.

I can play many of the GnR songs ( or atleast big parts of them, the fast shredding and fast legato runs and stuff are killing me ).
Reason why is i give them as a reference is so you maybe get a hint on where my ability with a guitar is.

Now however i seem to be a little lost on where to go next with my guitar. What should i practice ? I see alot of people talking about scales and stuff , is that the way to go ?

My goal with the guitar isnt to play in a band or make it as a professional but it is to be able to know the guitar and to be able to play alot of my favourite songs.

Any advice on where i should go now is really appriciated.
#2
Quote by nicklaspetrel


So today 2 years later i know the open chords and can switch between them like there is no problem. Some of the bar chords ive also learned.
Power chords is something i play daily.
Ive practiced alternate picking and economy picking. I know how to read a tab and to do stuff like hammer-on and pull-offs.

I can play many of the GnR songs ( or atleast big parts of them, the fast shredding and fast legato runs and stuff are killing me ).
Reason why is i give them as a reference is so you maybe get a hint on where my ability with a guitar is.


This isn't bad at all imo, seems like solid development for a 2-yearer.

Quote by nicklaspetrel

Now however i seem to be a little lost on where to go next with my guitar. What should i practice ? I see alot of people talking about scales and stuff , is that the way to go ?

My goal with the guitar isnt to play in a band or make it as a professional but it is to be able to know the guitar and to be able to play alot of my favourite songs.


This seems like a no-brainer, but maybe you should just keep learning songs. If your goal is to learn your favorite songs, do exactly that. Scales are a bit of a pitfall since a lot of people completely misunderstand what scales are and how to use them. If you thrive to understand the guitar and you're interested in stuff like scales, maybe you should look into some basic theory, like naming the notes, learning them on the fretboard, studying intervals etc. Instead of looking into scales, I would look into the concept of keys and their usage as well.

If you're not interested in theory or professional music, you might just want to learn a lot of songs. Trying to write something of your own can't hurt either. You need to understand your own goals and work towards them, so if your goal is to understand the instrument and play a lot of songs, you should maybe learn a bit of theory and learn a lot of songs.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#3
Quote by Kevätuhri
This isn't bad at all imo, seems like solid development for a 2-yearer.


This seems like a no-brainer, but maybe you should just keep learning songs. If your goal is to learn your favorite songs, do exactly that. Scales are a bit of a pitfall since a lot of people completely misunderstand what scales are and how to use them. If you thrive to understand the guitar and you're interested in stuff like scales, maybe you should look into some basic theory, like naming the notes, learning them on the fretboard, studying intervals etc. Instead of looking into scales, I would look into the concept of keys and their usage as well.

If you're not interested in theory or professional music, you might just want to learn a lot of songs. Trying to write something of your own can't hurt either. You need to understand your own goals and work towards them, so if your goal is to understand the instrument and play a lot of songs, you should maybe learn a bit of theory and learn a lot of songs.


First of thanks alot for your answer.

Im quite satisfied in a way with my development but there is always some fine tuning and i can always get better and faster etc.
I know one thing i need to be better at is to not just play the notes, but to play the notes to the music if you know what i mean.
Sometimes ( often in the fast parts ) i get so focused on just playing the right notes , the feeling just isnt there and it doesnt sound good.

My goal is to being able to look up a song , printing out the tabs to them and being able to play them and play them good. Being better at legato and using my little pinky when playing. Maybe some theory aswell just to get a
I have some problems with rythms ive noticed so that is what ive been practicing alot the last couple of weeks. Knowing different strum patterns and such.

I have some problem with speed but i know i need to play it perfect slow and they slowly playing it faster and faster.

Do you have any idea on where i could start learning theory online?

Is there any good excercises i should start doing to improve legato , hammer-ons , pull-offs ?
Like a TAB that i can use.
#4
Quote by nicklaspetrel
Do you have any idea on where i could start learning theory online?

Is there any good excercises i should start doing to improve legato , hammer-ons , pull-offs ?
Like a TAB that i can use.


musictheory dot net is a popular site, but it has quite an academic approach and uses a lot of standard notation. You could at least check it out.

There's a great youtube series by the name of "music theory from the ground up" from Ben Levin that explains the basics really well. I maybe wouldn't watch the mode lessons if I were you since modes can get confusing, but everything before that is pretty great information.

As for those techniques, the approaches I favor are the following: find existing guitar solos that you like that use those techniques and learn them. This is infinitely more fun and rewarding that just doing a technical exercise from a tab. and the second one is to create some exercises yourself. Try to write a lick or a melody that sounds good with legato and practice that. This will also develop your songwriting skills a bit.

One thing you could try if you'd like is ear training. Listening to a song, and trying to play the vocal/lead melody by ear is a fun exercise and really useful. This is also more or less the best exercise to do if you'd like to learn how to write music yourself, as it develops that "inner ear" that tells you if the part you just came up with sounds good or not. Ear training is important and when done correctly it's also very fun, so you could look into that. It also lets you learn songs more efficiently, as you wouldn't be completely dependent on tab.

Have you recorded yourself playing? It's an another useful thing to do, as it let's you listen to yourself and notice mistakes more efficiently, which in turn let's you fix those mistakes more easily. And recording music can be really fun.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#5
Quote by Kevätuhri
musictheory dot net is a popular site, but it has quite an academic approach and uses a lot of standard notation. You could at least check it out.

There's a great youtube series by the name of "music theory from the ground up" from Ben Levin that explains the basics really well. I maybe wouldn't watch the mode lessons if I were you since modes can get confusing, but everything before that is pretty great information.

As for those techniques, the approaches I favor are the following: find existing guitar solos that you like that use those techniques and learn them. This is infinitely more fun and rewarding that just doing a technical exercise from a tab. and the second one is to create some exercises yourself. Try to write a lick or a melody that sounds good with legato and practice that. This will also develop your songwriting skills a bit.

One thing you could try if you'd like is ear training. Listening to a song, and trying to play the vocal/lead melody by ear is a fun exercise and really useful. This is also more or less the best exercise to do if you'd like to learn how to write music yourself, as it develops that "inner ear" that tells you if the part you just came up with sounds good or not. Ear training is important and when done correctly it's also very fun, so you could look into that. It also lets you learn songs more efficiently, as you wouldn't be completely dependent on tab.

Have you recorded yourself playing? It's an another useful thing to do, as it let's you listen to yourself and notice mistakes more efficiently, which in turn let's you fix those mistakes more easily. And recording music can be really fun.


I will look in to that youtube series and check it out, thanks !

Thats kinda the way ive been practicing so far. Ive looked up the TAB for lets say November Rain and then ive learnt it. Thats the way ive learned how to do legato, bends and hammer-on/pull-offs. Im currently working on the Outro for November Rain but the really fast parts is killing me, im having a hard time nailing it fast enough and with it also sounding good.

I have recorded myself, did post a video a few weeks ago me playing Dont Cry solo to get feedback - you can check it out and see if you have any input there.

Ive never tried listening to a song or solo and they tried to copy it without looking up the tabs. You got any easy solo that i can just listen to and then try to copy with just my hearing ?
#6
"Living after midnight" by Judas Priest is a good, slow solo. Another one could be the intro solo of "the day that never comes" by Metallica.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#7
Can you see a teacher, even briefly?

The path to playing fast is learning to relax the muscles invloved, and the brain!

I was fascinated when, during a discussion on the Rio Olympics 100m sprint, those "in-the-know" were talking about being totally relaxed when running at speed. Because tenseness causes tightnress, and tightness creates barriers to performance (and they spotted that in one of the runners)

So, a good teacher should watch you, and observe, and inform what's happening, and what needs working on for technique.

Also. guitar make, set up, string gauge ... all contribute.
#8
I've been playing even less time than you (about 1 1/2 years) but one thing I've noticed is I seem to progress faster technically when I "throw out" the easier songs in my repertoire and focus on the ones that are harder to play. I seem to have a limit of about 3-4 hours worth of songs I can "remember" at a time with the amount of practice I do, so once in awhile I have to just make the decision to stop playing some of them and learn some new ones.
#9
I could see a teacher but im not sure about that. Maybe just to get some feedback on my current status. I got a bad experience from working with a teacher before and all it gave me was a hole in my wallet

bptrav:
Same here, i dont play any "easier" songs. Im not going at any super advanced either but something that really is a challenge for me and that seems to help out. I often work on a couple of songs at the same time just so i dont get bored playing the same thing over and over.
#10
hey buddy, contact me here *link removed by moderator* - I'll give you free professional advice on all that you need now and I would like you to explain me better your problem
#11
Quote by tonymetal1
hey buddy, contact me here antonoparinlessons@gmail.com - I'll give you free professional advice on all that you need now and I would like you to explain me better your problem


Going for the hard sell fella? That's 3 threads I've opened this morning and all of them with you trying to sell lessons.
#12
Quote by nicklaspetrel
I could see a teacher but im not sure about that. Maybe just to get some feedback on my current status. I got a bad experience from working with a teacher before and all it gave me was a hole in my wallet
.


Well, I can show you for the bargain price of $100 per minute :-)

Absolutely, don't get ripped off for poor quality stuff.

Seriously, just think on having someone check what your doing physically ... even if you pay for one lesson (or better still, get your first (and only) lesson free).
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Sep 15, 2016,