#1
Hello To all I am new and just joined this forum.

Was thinking If I can learn all the guitar technique with my acoustic I have Yahama F-330 and was thinking to buy Yahama's RGX220DZ electric guitar. However, I don't have enough funds to buy the guitar at the present time.

And Suddenly though about practicing all the techniques on my acoustic.
Just want to confirm cCan I learn all the techniques with my acoustic. Also If I can get a list of guitar techniques I can do it would be awesome.

Thanks
#2
See thread "which guitar should I practice with"

There is a fully fleshed out (occasionally derailed) discussion gauged around (sorta) this topic

And yes, there is a significant overlap with technique

Though there is a degree of issue regarding the difference in posture when playing acoustic vs electric. Considering your picking hand will rest differently on the body of either guitar. The neck sizes will be different and the scale/overall feel will be different

One of the greatest obstacles to overcome in regards to playing guitar, is keeping your guitar from making the noises you don't want it to make. Such as having open strings and unnecessary harmonics ring out while playing with distortion/high gain.

The music is universal, as in, the music theory doesn't change when you change mediums.

In short, yes technique will transfer (sort of) directly. Alternate picking, economy picking, hybrid/chikin picking, sweeping, string skipping, tapping, and finger picking will translate...

However, you must keep in mind that your posture and hand positioning will have to change in order to adjust to the new physical object that you're putting in your lap. Same with the distortion issues, notes will ring out, fretting translation and stretches will be difficult, and eventually things might frustrate you.

Just keep practicing and you'll become a better player the more versatile you make yourself
Legato and fluidity in your playing is where it's at

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#3
I would practice on the type of instrument you plan on playing. There are a lot of differences to be taken into consideration, like string damping and lightness of touch. I played acoustic for a long time before a tried electrics, and I have never adapted to the latter to my satisfaction. - The two are essentially different instruments.
#4
Depends on what type of music you want to play, but YES...playing acoustic will make you stronger, in my opinion.

2 step bends will be a bit difficult, but anything else will be fine. It's a bit harder on acoustic, so switching to electric will be like butter.
#5
To an extent, yes, but basically what tony says.
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#7
Personally, I'm not a fan of acoustic guitars. The strings just have too much tension on them and it's unpleasant to play. I like springy strings, not stiff or floppy ones.
#8
Thanks guys for clearing my doubts. And yes I have built my finger stronger to some extent but have to work on the right-hand part for the string. I skip it sometimes. This is really a nice forum. Love to be a part of this forum and feeling more motivated and happy to get connected with good guitar players and musicians.

Thanks a lot you all.
#9
ZacharyVolt
I absolutely know what you mean, and all my guitars provide that springy, spongy feeling with the strings.

With an acoustic, it really depends on the make, and the setup, and of course, the strings. I have both my acoustics set up for legato playing. I use 9 - 46 gauge strings. Very, very playable.
#10
Keep strings light on acoustic and you can get close enough...the hardest part for sure is the noise issue with electric and the slim body of it which puts it in a different spot on your body. Those are fairly quick adjustments tho in a months time.
#11
shashank8036 Hello buddy. I would recommend you to play on acoustic guitar even after you'll start playing on electric guitar. Acoustic guitar has thicker strings, it's harder to play on it, it trains your fingers and hands. It's great! Also on Acoustic guitar you train your hands to get more sustain from the sound, more quality since you hear all problems in your technique better. believe me, I played guitar professionally for 15 years. It's awesome! If you need a professional coach that could help you to build awesome technique and awesome sound. Contact me here - *link removed by moderator*
It's just 80 dollars per month, super cheap for one month of professional coach training, but watch my videos on youtube when I was much younger and what I played, I promise to build personal system for you. I could become your personal coach. We can start right now. Just send me a message
#12
Quote by tonymetal1
shashank8036 Hello buddy. I would recommend you to play on acoustic guitar even after you'll start playing on electric guitar. Acoustic guitar has thicker strings, it's harder to play on it, it trains your fingers and hands. It's great! Also on Acoustic guitar you train your hands to get more sustain from the sound, more quality since you hear all problems in your technique better. believe me, I played guitar professionally for 15 years. It's awesome! If you need a professional coach that could help you to build awesome technique and awesome sound. Contact me here - *link removed by moderator*
It's just 80 dollars per month, super cheap for one month of professional coach training, but watch my videos on youtube when I was much younger and what I played, I promise to build personal system for you. I could become your personal coach. We can start right now. Just send me a message


Geez man, have you advertised on every thread?
#13
The only thing that's really difficult to practice on an acoustic is bending.

Also, what happened to the report button?
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#14
Quote by tonymetal1
shashank8036 Hello buddy. I would recommend you to play on acoustic guitar even after you'll start playing on electric guitar. Acoustic guitar has thicker strings, it's harder to play on it, it trains your fingers and hands. It's great! Also on Acoustic guitar you train your hands to get more sustain from the sound, more quality since you hear all problems in your technique better. believe me, I played guitar professionally for 15 years. It's awesome! If you need a professional coach that could help you to build awesome technique and awesome sound. Contact me here -
It's just 80 dollars per month, super cheap for one month of professional coach training, but watch my videos on youtube when I was much younger and what I played, I promise to build personal system for you. I could become your personal coach. We can start right now. Just send me a message

The forums are not the place for you to advertise your business. You are more than welcome to contribute and be a part of the community, but if this happens again you will be banned. I would highly suggest reading the forum rules before posting.
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#15
It all depends, basic picking and strumming is easy enough but bending notes is a lot harder on an acoustic, and it's also harder to get individual notes to sustain, espacially through things like slides. Likewise you have to work a lot harder with hammer ons and pull offs - I personally don't subscribe to the myth that making life harder for yourself automatically means you're practicing "better". Likewise some techniques don't really sound right on an acoustic - powerchords tend to sound a bit flat and empty because the whole point of them is that they work better with a distorted guitar tone.
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