#1
I would like to start a band, but I have a few questions.

1. It's hard to find people with similar music taste to me. Would it be better to start out as a cover band?
I really like the sound of 80's hard rock & glam metal (Def Leppard, Guns N' Roses, Motley Crue, etc.), although I'm not partial to the look. Would starting as a cover band make it easier to find people with similar interests as opposed to just posting an ad for "Hard Rock Musicians"? What other things could I do to try and find people who like the same music as me.

2. Do you think that being female would deter people from wanting to be in a band with me?
I would prefer to be in a band with guys, but I'm worried that they wouldn't want to be in a band with me. This is not to say that I wouldn't work with girls, but generally I connect more to guys, and wouldn't want to be in an all girl band. It seems that women in rock are not taken as seriously as men, and are judged using a different scale. How could I prevent this?

3. What is the best age to start a band, and what age range to look at?
Pretty self explanatory.

Thanks in advance
#2
If you want to play your own music, have you written any songs? If you have, record some demos and upload them to SoundCloud so that people can hear what kind of music you would like to play. If you haven't, I think a cover band may be a better idea for a start. It's easier to learn to play in a band if you don't need to worry about writing your own material/finding your style at the same time. Band playing is a skill that you need to learn.

Also, remember that people's tastes can be flexible. People usually like more than just one style or just one subgenre. Maybe find people that like rock music and let all members choose a couple of songs to play. Playing in a band is usually a bit of a compromise and not every song you play will be your favorite song. But playing in a band is about more than playing your favorite songs. I even enjoy playing music that I don't enjoy listening to. That's because I just enjoy playing with other people (but I know not everybody is willing to play music that they don't like listening to). If you are in school, I'm sure there are plenty of people who would like to play in a band and who like rock music. Remember that it's your first band and it's most likely not going to be anything special. But it's important to start from somewhere. I don't think you should have too high expectations of your first band.


I can only speak for myself, but at least to me your gender wouldn't matter. But if people don't take you seriously (because you are a girl), they are not worth your time. I wouldn't even try to convince them - they are jerks and you don't want to be in the same band with them. But I would guess most people won't judge you based on your gender. It may actually even be a positive thing - people may just think that you are cool because you are a girl that plays rock music.


You can start a band at any age. The sooner, the better. As I said, it's a skill you need to learn and the more you do it, the better you get at it. I would find people that are not too much younger/older than you. Well, that of course depends on how old you are. If everybody in the band is an adult, then I don't think the age matters that much, but if some are teens and some are in their 40s, that may be a bit awkward.
Quote by AlanHB
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Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
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Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
Quote by TerriB3
I would like to start a band
First question: why? Why not be a solo performer? (Assuming you can both sing and play.)
Quote by TerriB3
, but I have a few questions.

1. It's hard to find people with similar music taste to me. Would it be better to start out as a cover band?
The way most bands begin is by playing covers of songs they like. I.e. bunch of players with broadly similar tastes get together and jam on anything that's easy enough to play - which tends to mean existing songs with well-known sequences, rather than self-compositions where it's all got to be worked out before you can play anything.
I.e., you kind of work your way into playing your own compositions, accepting ideas from the band too.
That's unless you're very confident of your own tunes, you can easily communicate how they go, and your backing band are skilled and amenable to your ideas. A nice dream.... Maybe you could kidnap some session musicians and chain them up in your basement. Give them food and drink and promise to let them go when they've recorded your first album.
Quote by TerriB3

I really like the sound of 80's hard rock & glam metal (Def Leppard, Guns N' Roses, Motley Crue, etc.), although I'm not partial to the look.
OK, music that sounds like that but looks different could be interesting... although theres probably quite a lot of it around...
Quote by TerriB3

Would starting as a cover band make it easier to find people with similar interests as opposed to just posting an ad for "Hard Rock Musicians"?
I suggest you advertise by just listing those acts you mention, so you find musicians as close to your tastes as you can. "Hard Rock" is too general and will get you all kinds of responses you probably don't want. No need to mention covers or originals as being your plan, but something suggesting the idea of building on that foundation would be good. You like those acts, but equally you want to move forward too, not just be an 80s rock tribute act!
Quote by TerriB3

What other things could I do to try and find people who like the same music as me.
Open mics? If there are any near you, it's an ideal way to meet fellow musicians, because you can hear them before you have to talk to them, they can hear you (without having to talk to you), and they probably live locally too. And you may find a cool community, and you might actually find your own tastes and goals adapting.
Quote by TerriB3

2. Do you think that being female would deter people from wanting to be in a band with me?
Maybe the opposite! It's obviously a sexist world out there, but it cuts both ways. The very fact that female rock musicians are rare gives you extra value. I don't think there's many male rock musicians these days who'd think a female band member is a drawback in any way. Even the most chauvinist rocker would probably think having a girl in the band is a plus (though maybe for the wrong reasons...). Of course, you'd need to be prepared to deal with male musicians who might think - even if subconsciously - that they should have the last word creatively.
Quote by TerriB3

I would prefer to be in a band with guys, but I'm worried that they wouldn't want to be in a band with me. This is not to say that I wouldn't work with girls, but generally I connect more to guys, and wouldn't want to be in an all girl band. It seems that women in rock are not taken as seriously as men, and are judged using a different scale. How could I prevent this?
Don't bank on being able to. There's definitely an institutional sexism in rock, but - as I say - that can work in your favour too. The fact you "connect more with guys" is good. They will respect the fact that you understand rock in the same way they do, that you're not just some girly who wants to sing Summertime and knows nothing .

I suggest you learn from those who've been there before: front women like Chrissie Hynde, P H Harvey, Debbie Harry, Courtney Love, as well as female band members (of largely male bands) like Tina Weymouth, Meg White, Kim Gordon, Kim Deal, Gillian Gilbert. Also mixed gender bands like Fleetwood Mac, Heart, Black Eyed Peas, Arcade Fire.
Mixed genders in bands is much less an issue these days, often not even commented on. In fact, it may be that the trouble you'll have is connected wth your favoured genre and period, which really was dominated by men (even though they all liked to dress in a very androgynous way... which ought to tell you something... )
Quote by TerriB3

3. What is the best age to start a band, and what age range to look at?
No limits! You'll know yourself what ages you get on best with, whether you think you might be comfortable with musicians much older or younger than you. Musicians much older can be intimidating, and could be patronising towards you - but equally they can be usefully mature, with good connections, as well as impressively skilled and open-minded... if you're lucky. But they could also be fat, bald and ugly (Which is OK as long as you're serious about the glam-rock look really not being important )
OTOH, musicians much younger might think you're too old to be cool . Even if you're only 18, some 14-year-old whiz kid will just be waiting till they can dump you and get their 13-year-old friends in instead...
Last edited by jongtr at Aug 28, 2016,
#4
Go for it! Get clear realistic goals about what you want to do, where you want to play, and what type of music you want to do. Find bandmates with similar interests that you can get along with and start practicing. Girl or guy doesn't matter much as long as the player shows up prepared and doesn't create a bunch of band drama. Once you have players you can work with stay focused but be flexible and allow the sound of the band to evolve with input from all of the players.

I was in a band at age 13 and we played our first paid gig at 14. Been in bands for most of my life and don't plan to stop playing ever. One of my friends played drums with Lita Ford for a while and had a great experience. Go for it!
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#5
Quote by TerriB3


1. It's hard to find people with similar music taste to me. Would it be better to start out as a cover band?


Yup. You can write your own music as well, but you'll gain a lot of proficiency and learn a lot about how bands work by just getting going with something everyone's heard. No need to be strictly one band (tribute). Do a lot of things.

Quote by TerriB3
2. Do you think that being female would deter people from wanting to be in a band with me?


No.

Quote by TerriB3
3. What is the best age to start a band, and what age range to look at?


Best age is right now, and you'll probably want to find bandmates at a similar stage of life. Just easier.
#6
TerriB3

1. It's hard to find people with similar music taste to me. Would it be better to start out as a cover band?

Those are pretty specific tastes - I would suggest finding people who play rock generally and finding common ground if possible. Be prepared to compromise a lot unless you live in a very big city.

2. Do you think that being female would deter people from wanting to be in a band with me?

Absolutely not - I think it's a plus. A Band is by default more interesting and noticeable if there's even one female in there - Band of Skulls, Metric, Arcade Fire, etc -

3. What is the best age to start a band, and what age range to look at?

Sooner the better, but it's never too late. Bands have the most fun in their 20's because people in their 20's still go to shows, stay up late and like to party and people have very few commitments. As people get into their 30's musical interest drops significantly, kids, jobs , houses - people become zombies. That being said, you can gig at any age and still have a great time and there are always people at every age group ready to play.
#7
Interessting! Where do you live ? a big city ? Easyer to find bandmembers put up a not in the store , or ask around , go to a lokal consert and talk to the band .
#8
First I think it's important to decide what you want to do in general terms but I think joining or starting a cover band is the way to go. Depending on where you live, a decent cover band can find work and getting paid for playing and developing a following is always a good thing. In a cover band you will learn the importance of compromising as you will have to play songs in styles that you would not have chosen to learn on your own. This increases your playing skills and opens you up to broader aspects of being a musician like learning how to perform rather than just play. In a cover band will learn from your fellow musicians and they in turn will learn from you. This will speed up your abilities and broaden your techniques.

I work with a female drummer who is also a great lead singer. She was a professional singer for many years before getting behind the drums. She started playing drums when she realized how much better her opportunities would be if she played an instrument rather than just front a band. Female singers are fairly common but female singers who also play an instrument serve a band situation much better. I know you didn't mention whether or not you are also a singer but you get my point.

Get out to clubs that feature local bands or open mic nights. Introduce yourself to band members who play a little better than you do (you won't learn anything from someone who plays below your own playing level). Have business cards printed. This is important. For $10 you can get 250 cards from "Vista Print" or any other service. Nothing fancy, just the basics, your name, your contact number, your email and what kind of instrument you play (and if you also sing, add "Singer"). This small detail will make you look serious and more professional. Writing your number on a bar napkin won't do. Good luck.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Sep 6, 2016,
#9
Quote by TerriB3
I would like to start a band, but I have a few questions.

1. It's hard to find people with similar music taste to me. Would it be better to start out as a cover band?
I really like the sound of 80's hard rock & glam metal (Def Leppard, Guns N' Roses, Motley Crue, etc.), although I'm not partial to the look. Would starting as a cover band make it easier to find people with similar interests as opposed to just posting an ad for "Hard Rock Musicians"? What other things could I do to try and find people who like the same music as me.

2. Do you think that being female would deter people from wanting to be in a band with me?
I would prefer to be in a band with guys, but I'm worried that they wouldn't want to be in a band with me. This is not to say that I wouldn't work with girls, but generally I connect more to guys, and wouldn't want to be in an all girl band. It seems that women in rock are not taken as seriously as men, and are judged using a different scale. How could I prevent this?

3. What is the best age to start a band, and what age range to look at?
Pretty self explanatory.

Thanks in advance


1) Finding band mates who share your tastes shouldn't be that hard, with your tastes. It would be hard if you liked some obscure type of extreme metal but GnR? A lot of musicians love GnR.

More important, it's OK if different members don't play exactly the same style. I play in a band that started as Punk Rock, evolved more into Metal as new members joined in, while the bassist's favorite style is funk.

What is much more important is that you find members to share your GOALS. Do you want to play a few gigs in a local pub? Find musicians who also want that. Want to tour the world? Find like minded musicians. Otherwise you're going to have problems.

2) I can't see any valid reason why being female should be a problem. If someone auditions for my band I care about what they can play, their personality and their attitude. Gender is non-issue.

3) If you can play, the best age to start a band is NOW, whether you're 14 or 55.
#10
TerriB3 To be completely honest the best thing to do would be to ask yourself why you want to play in a band....So why ? Whatever that answer may be just be true to that and don't kid yourself. If you are trying to play just to play then just play whatever you want...I personally don't understand picking up a guitar just to play other peoples music (other than for the purpose of making money) for me its all about creating stuff. As for the rest of it, No one cares if you are female but rather if you can actually play and sing, also no one cares what age you are if you can play and sing and do it well. Good luck
#11
Quote by Bromandudeguy
I personally don't understand picking up a guitar just to play other peoples music

Well, that's basically what most classical musicians do...
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#12
^ and plenty of other people too.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
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#13
I've been wanting to start a band for a while but never got around to it. That being said, I would probably put a short list of influences on the ad and put it on Craigslist. About being a girl, can you sing? It's usually a plus for many if the girl's either a vocalist or perhaps the drummer (like Kim Pines from Scott Pilgrim). Good bands with female vocalists include but aren't limited to; Heart, Nightwish, Halestorm, The Metric, Archenemy (yes a Melodic Death Metal band has a female vocalist and she growls too), and many Symphonic Metal bands. I'd say go for it and do what makes you happy.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#14
MaggaraMarine Right but what I'm talking about is picking up guitar just so you can play covers in a bar.... its way more gooder to play original stuffff with friends if your going to go out of your way to do it all. For instance...I know plenty of miserable musicians stuck in cover bands that wish they could do some original albums or have a band that can create ideas but instead are stuck playing top 40 hits to some old ass cougars in a bar somewhere. lol To each their own I guess.
Last edited by Bromandudeguy at Sep 20, 2016,
#15
If you can play well enough to be in a good cover band it is one of the best experiences you can have. You learn many different styles and techniques build up a following and often (if your band is good) get paid fairly well. Money buys better gear and better gear and consistent playing makes you and your band play better and sound better thus bringing you more audience and more money. If down the road your band manages to write some decent original material you can incorporate it into your bands material and play to the audience you already established. You'd be hard pressed to find any big name musicians who didn't start by learning other peoples songs or playing in a cover band when they first started. I'm sure out of the millions of bands out there may be a few but I doubt there are many. If you want to just "jam" with friends or as Joe Walsh puts it "become a legend in your own garage" that's alright also. Everybody has their own idea of what goals they want to achieve but I think if are serious about playing then just get out there in front of people and play as often as possible.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Sep 21, 2016,