#1
Had this guitar for over 12 years and was having problems with the original nut tried fixing it original but it started chipping . Well I could not get a pre made nut for this guitar it was a limited addition and they made a thin neck and non of the standard nuts Had the proper string spacing , So I decided to buy a bone block and have ago myself ,

Without any experience in nut building a watch a few u tube videos and read a few online guides , I first started to shape the nut with files by hand and sand paper , I have not polished it up as I don’t know if to make another as I feel I could probably improve , I feel rather than have it sharp slanted down I should have done it more round and down , Also maybe the low E string it not deep enough in the nut but I cant take it down anymore as it would cause buzz , The hardest part for me is making the string slot as it really hard to do something without knowing if its right. So this was my first bone nut build I would like to know what you guys think and does this pass or should I prepare to build another ,

I haven’t play it thought the amp but I have give it a few strums and it sounds ok , I think G and B string might be going slightly flat not sure if it’s the string as they have been well used.









#2
It looks neat, but the top working surface of the nut is a bit too narrow, IMO, and will be both wear- and accident-prone. I typically make mine so that the top of the nut is as wide as the bottom, with only a slight fall-off between the fretboard side and the headstock side, not the steep angle that you have. - This means that the string is resting on the full width of the nut. However, because it looks OK, I would likely leave it as-is for now.
#3
Quote by Tony Done
It looks neat, but the top working surface of the nut is a bit too narrow, IMO, and will be both wear- and accident-prone. I typically make mine so that the top of the nut is as wide as the bottom, with only a slight fall-off between the fretboard side and the headstock side, not the steep angle that you have. - This means that the string is resting on the full width of the nut. However, because it looks OK, I would likely leave it as-is for now.
I just played it though the amp and Surprisingly sounds better than the old plastic nut which was in poor shape, I think I will leave it on for a few weeks maybe try a set of new string and see if any of the strings go out of tune . I much prefer playing than repairing but I do feel I can improve my next nut build and I would defiantly make the top of the nut wider next time .
#5
The angle is way too steep. It should be like the one Tony posted, barely any angle, so the strings are supported better. If it doesn't have a tendency to cut through and break strings, you might be ok. You can also see properly cut nut slots in tony's picture, the bass side of the strings are sitting about half the diameter of the strings in the slots, smaller strings are a little deeper, but only to about the top of the strings. The picture is misleading, even though you can see some angle, the nut slots are usually cut a little shallower so they have good support, but still have a definite front edge for intonation. Some people actually file them to a cone, so the side to side is a little wider in back but the right depth.

Your two biggest strings are not deep enough and spacing is off, smaller strings are probably too deep. Not bad for a first try, I've seen worse, some look like they have been just butchered. Now that I look closer, spacing is off between 2nd, 3rd and 4th strings too. Best way to get spacing is to put the old nut side by side and mark it with a pencil. If the old one is not available, a ruler is the only way to go, or find a guitar with the same size and mark the tops from it. Music stores might let you do that as long as they know you won't be marking on their guitars...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...