Poll: Floyd rose or not.
Poll Options
View poll results: Floyd rose or not.
Yes I love a floyd rose bridge
4 24%
No, I like simplicity.
9 53%
Other.
4 24%
Voters: 17.
#1
Which of you has a preference for the Floyd Rose bridge with the whammy bar?

Which of you don't, and why?

When I was younger I loved the floyd rose bridge because I just loved the sound it makes basically and I love Eddy Van Halen.

These days I think the additional effort of stringing up the guitar and using alan keys to tune the guitar up isn't worth the effort.

But even now guitars with the floyd rose still catch my eye, I've been looking at the new ibanez jem steve vai signature guitar.

Buckethead is actually my favorite guitar player and his signature guitar has no floyd rose although I have seen videos of him using guitars with the floyd rose.
#2
I was literally the first guy in town to have a guitar with a Floyd Rose (Kramer Pacer) back in the early 80s. my tech did my setup for free just so he'd have the chance to tinker with the Floyd. used them (and other locking trems like kahler and washburn wonderbar) until 2008 and then stopped. since then I've been using strats with the vintage style trems as that just works for me at this point. I like using the bar but I really don't do anything to crazy with it so just don't need a Floyd.
#3
Why does it matter to you what I think?

I do like Floyds. The original Floyd is especially delightful to use.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Aug 28, 2016,
#4
Quote by paulpablo
Which of you has a preference for the Floyd Rose bridge with the whammy bar?

Which of you don't, and why?

When I was younger I loved the floyd rose bridge because I just loved the sound it makes basically and I love Eddy Van Halen.

These days I think the additional effort of stringing up the guitar and using alan keys to tune the guitar up isn't worth the effort.



You don't use hex wrenches to tune the guitar. I think you've forgotten how that works.

I have Floyds on perhaps 80% of the guitars that I play regularly or for money. I don't love Van Halen. I do like the fact that the guitars really stay in tune better than without (especially true of LP-style guitars). I've learned to change strings quickly and no, I don't do them one at a time. Fact is, I usually pull all six strings off at once, load the new ones into the bridge all at once and then run them up to the tuners all at once. It doesn't take all that long to have them *fairly* decently stretched out and in tune. The "one at a time" business actually slows things down a whole lot, and I didn't like that either.

I like Floyds with big brass "upgrade" sustain blocks for the way they feel and for the slight change in sound that they produce.
#5
I like them on guitars that suit them.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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#6
Quote by dspellman
You don't use hex wrenches to tune the guitar. I think you've forgotten how that works.



I've seen people that thought the intonation adjustment was the tuning system, especially on very old FR's with no fine tuners, and that may be the case here.

Quote by dspellman
I do like the fact that the guitars really stay in tune better than without


I agree, and it seems to me a hardtail bridge with fine tuners coupled with a locking nut would stay in tune damn near forever...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
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Last edited by Arby911 at Aug 29, 2016,
#7
I love my Floyd, I love the way it looks on a guitar, the way it feels and my guitars are in tune and rock solid all day and I'm a very heavy handed player.
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#8
My thoughts are :

1) it creates a hassle on string changes and setups in general.
2) a normal Fender style tremolo is already great at this stage and you can do a ton with them - see Jeff beck - they stay in tune just fine if your guitar is setup properly, so tuning is really a non issue. I have a Wilkinson vintage style trem on my silhouette Special from Musicman and it basically never goes out of tune, even with abuse.
3) the ONLY real benefit of a Floyd, and the sole reason you should have one, is if you plan on doing crazy Vai type whammy maneuvers that require the Floyd - in other words, you can't play want you want without it.
#9
Quote by reverb66
My thoughts are :

1) it creates a hassle on string changes and setups in general.
2) a normal Fender style tremolo is already great at this stage and you can do a ton with them - see Jeff beck - they stay in tune just fine if your guitar is setup properly, so tuning is really a non issue. I have a Wilkinson vintage style trem on my silhouette Special from Musicman and it basically never goes out of tune, even with abuse.


I'm not finding the "hassle" on string changes or setups. OTOH, I'm changing strings pretty often, given the number of Floyds I have to deal with, so perhaps familiarity is the key here. You can remove the Floyd completely from the guitar, add/change strings and then drop it back into the guitar without affecting the overall setup.

A Wilkinson does mostly just fine on guitar with a straight pull headstock and little headstock angle. Where you've got a Les Paul-style headstock with the strings both dropping back and being pulled to the sides, tuning can be an issue with a hard tail. A Floyd with a locking nut or a Kahler behind-the-nut string lock is about the only way to take that out of the equation and ensure your ability to hold tune.

In short, I've found that having a Floyd on the guitar is beneficial, and not just for "crazy Vai type whammy maneuvers."
#10
It´s not about "simplicity"; mainly it´s about having less tuning problems; Therefore my option is "Other". Yes I know the legit Floyd stays in tune, I´m referrring to the numerous lower quality bridges that are there in entry level guitars, etc.
#11
Quote by Lardin
I´m referrring to the numerous lower quality bridges that are there in entry level guitars, etc.

Not all low quality guitars have bad floyds though. I have a Jackson JS32 King V (It's a fairly cheap guitar), and the floyd surprisingly stays in tune for a long time.

On OP's topic though, I originally got a floyd because they look badass. But then when I got it I realized I was going to have aneurisms from the painful hours of tuning ahead. But it's been months and I've learned, and now retuning a floyd is easy and fast for me. I used to regret buying a guitar with one but now I'm happy I did because I can play songs and solos in the style of some of what Pantera has and songs Wes Borland (Limp Bizkit's guitarist) has written. Totally worth
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#12
^ does it react like a good floyd, though? staying in tune is only one of the perks of having a good-quality floyd.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#13
It's my opinion based on experience that the claim that inexpensive floating bridges won't stay in tune is generally the fault of the setup, not the hardware.

What they often will do is wear quicker, and once the pivot points wear then you MIGHT see some issues with them not consistently returning to zero, but even with cheap hardware that's not something that's going to manifest itself for quite a while unless there's an exceptional amount of usage.

Let's be real, the system consists of a few string clamps on both ends, a few screws, a block of metal riding on pivot points and a few springs. It's not exactly a technological masterpiece and there are very few parts of it where the materials or manufacturing quality actually matters.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#14
^ i'm pretty awful at setups admittedly, and yet every time i use a cheap floyd i can't get it to flutter or react the way i'd like. whereas the good ones just do it as a matter of course.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#15
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ i'm pretty awful at setups admittedly, and yet every time i use a cheap floyd i can't get it to flutter or react the way i'd like. whereas the good ones just do it as a matter of course.


If you could explain to me why that happens I'd be happy to try to understand, but I can't see any rational reason for it. (Worn gear excepted, as noted.)

So until then I'll keep believing it's a hardware failure.

A loose nut between the strings and the stage...


“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#16
I like by hardtail guitars for what they are. I like my FR guitars for what they are and I like my strat bridge for what it is. Same reason they all have different pickups and often different strings. They are used for different sounds and types of music.

I'll add that I do really enjoy how well a nicely setup FR stays in tune.
#17
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ i'm pretty awful at setups admittedly, and yet every time i use a cheap floyd i can't get it to flutter or react the way i'd like. whereas the good ones just do it as a matter of course.


My cheap ones flutter the same as the expensive ones.

Maybe it's a setup issue?
#18
Quote by Lardin
It´s not about "simplicity"; mainly it´s about having less tuning problems; Therefore my option is "Other". Yes I know the legit Floyd stays in tune, I´m referrring to the numerous lower quality bridges that are there in entry level guitars, etc.


I'm actually not running into issues with the cheaper ones that I have (though I suspect I may not have plumbed the depths yet). I have a couple of guitars that I *know* are sporting cheap Floyds, and I actually bought new OFRs for a couple of them (different finishes) and put the new ones on the shelf, anticipating having to swap them out at some point. But the things are just sailing along (knock on wood). The most remarkable one, probably, lives in a '92 Samick neck-through superstrat. Now just watch, because I've said something I'll probably hear a sproing, open the case, and find pieces rattling around...
#19
Quote by Arby911
If you could explain to me why that happens I'd be happy to try to understand, but I can't see any rational reason for it. (Worn gear excepted, as noted.)

So until then I'll keep believing it's a hardware failure.

A loose nut between the strings and the stage...




lol

Seriously, though, I have no idea. I just know it seems to happen with me. We don't have to be able to explain something to know it happens (though i agree having an explanation is obviously to be aimed for, assuming the explanation is actually correct). Interestingly enough, I thought it was maybe the sustain block, but now I'm not sure that's the case- my edge pro flutters pretty well (as well as my OFRs or Gotohs) and as far as I'm aware its sustain block isn't solid brass or steel, and is actually pretty weedy-looking. Maybe it's just the hardening of the knife edges? Or just the overall tolerances/build quality?

And that goes for the ones I have, and also ones I've tried in shops (admittedly a good while ago, and you're normally pretty lucky to get to try a trem in a shop because they normally take the bar off the guitars ).

Quote by dspellman
My cheap ones flutter the same as the expensive ones.

Maybe it's a setup issue?


yeah I was thinking that, but my answer to that would be (A) I'm much worse at actually getting the things to stay in tune than to get them to stay parallel to the guitar top and flutter etc. and (B) much more importantly, that would have to mean that somehow I'm rubbish at setting up the cheap ones but great at setting up the expensive ones, which doesn't make sense.

I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#20
I love mine. Of my three electric guitars, the one with the Floyd stays in tune better than the hardtails, and is more comfortable, in my opinion, for palm muting. When I don't need to do any actual whammy bar tricks, I like to block the Floyd and take off the bar. I prefer that over an actual hard tail. And the tuning/setup really isn't a hassle when you put in the minimal effort to do it right.

Only reason I have guitars that don't have floyds is that I have several different tunings I need to use in my cover band, and can't afford more guitars right now. So, the two hardtails need to go between E/drop D and Eb/drop C# regularly, while the Floyd guitar stays locked in D standard. If I could afford more, I'd just have a guitar for every tuning, all with Floyds.
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#21
A good, real-deal FR (Or equivalent) is always a lot of fun.

That being said, I tend to find myself preferring hardtail guitars these days. I tend to tinker with multiple tunings (E/Drop D, and D/Drop C mainly), and prefer the simplicity when it comes to string changes/setups.
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#22
Quote by reverb66
1) it creates a hassle on string changes and setups in general.
3) the ONLY real benefit of a Floyd, and the sole reason you should have one, is if you plan on doing crazy Vai type whammy maneuvers that require the Floyd - in other words, you can't play want you want without it.
The string changing is pretty easy to get used to, I've found, and the actual benefit of a Floyd, in my experience, is that it stays in tune better than anything, regardless of how you use your tremolo. I don't own one anymore, and I don't think I ever will purely because I hardly ever see a Floyd on a guitar that interests me as a whole, but whatever you do with it a good Floyd stays in tune for weeks on end, even with heavy use. Even my hardtail Tele (with a well-cut nut) goes out of tune quicker than a Floyd. Strat trems are nice, but put additional or higher tension springs on a Floyd and you've got the next best thing to a Bigsby; Strat trems just can't float that well.
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Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Sep 4, 2016,
#23
It really depends what you want the guitar for.

For a while there was a certain sound that I required on leads (think Kerry King divebombs) when I played thrash metal so a FR was a requirement...until I had to play a show with a single guitar and broke a string on a dive on the second song...then took me 10 minutes of the set to replace it while the band played two songs without me. So I ditched it for live performance since then and moved to fixed bridge when I had to do shows with one guitar.

For home I guess it is fine or if you can get two guitars for the gig.