#1
"Style" might be a poorly chosen title, maybe more about the architecture of his music.

To the point;
I recently watched this vid:
where Rob Chapman describes how Hendrix approached his song writing. Me among other are very confused by what he's saying and showing.

He describes playing a scale right on top of where the current chord is being played. Now, I have genuinely poor eyesight and can't work out if he is playing the scale from the same key through all the chords he's showing, or is he switching key depending on which chord he played?

So when he's playing G#m in the beginning I can tell he's playing the G minor blues scale, the first position if you like.
But then as he goes down to Amajor I can't recognize that he is playing from the same scale anymore, which had me wondering if he switched to the key of A when playing the scale over the A major chord?

No idea in my guessing and having you guys correcting them. Can anyone explain more simply what he's on about? (I fear I struggle to understand what he's talking about even more since he appears not to be in standard tuning?)

Thanks in advance!
#2
Ok, that is possibly one of the worst Hendrix lessons in existence- ignore it - it's a mess. No offense to him, but that is a confusing lesson and it really doesn't properly tackle the subject at all. Your confusion is well justified.

If you want to learn Hendrix's approach, learn some of his songs and riffs and ignore theory for now. For example, learn Little Wing, Axis Bold as Love, Wind Cries Mary, and Angel, and Castles Made of Sand - the slower material really hones in on his rhythm approach you will learn much more by simply learning those riffs than by some generic " Hendrix approach" lesson, which butchers the artistry. Hendrix's approach involves doing certain things over each chord, but those things are poorly understood outside of the musical context in which they reside. My best advice is to get some of his riffs under your belt first - check out Tim Pierce or Andy Aledort for proper lessons and learn the actual material. Once you have some of the material under your belt, then you can analyse it to see how you can apply it in other contexts. Stay aware of what lick is played over what chord and you'll interiorise his appraoch well - use your ears at first.
#3
One thing I'll say, worry less about your eyes and more about your ears - the way to tell if someone is playing the G minor blues scale is from the sound of what they're playing, not what it looks like their fingers are doing. Likewise you can tell if he switched to the key of A major by the sound of the music, not from where his hands are.
Actually called Mark!

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#4
Quote by reverb66
Ok, that is possibly one of the worst Hendrix lessons in existence- ignore it - it's a mess. No offense to him, but that is a confusing lesson and it really doesn't properly tackle the subject at all. Your confusion is well justified.

If you want to learn Hendrix's approach, learn some of his songs and riffs and ignore theory for now. For example, learn Little Wing, Axis Bold as Love, Wind Cries Mary, and Angel, and Castles Made of Sand - the slower material really hones in on his rhythm approach you will learn much more by simply learning those riffs than by some generic " Hendrix approach" lesson, which butchers the artistry. Hendrix's approach involves doing certain things over each chord, but those things are poorly understood outside of the musical context in which they reside. My best advice is to get some of his riffs under your belt first - check out Tim Pierce or Andy Aledort for proper lessons and learn the actual material. Once you have some of the material under your belt, then you can analyse it to see how you can apply it in other contexts. Stay aware of what lick is played over what chord and you'll interiorise his appraoch well - use your ears at first.


Quote by steven seagull
One thing I'll say, worry less about your eyes and more about your ears - the way to tell if someone is playing the G minor blues scale is from the sound of what they're playing, not what it looks like their fingers are doing. Likewise you can tell if he switched to the key of A major by the sound of the music, not from where his hands are.


Thank you guys, I'll dump that lesson. I totally agree with you both, I just thought I could shortcut my way there by learning the basics from the start. Just spent 2 hours analyzing some of his tracks and compared it musically to how he played them at the Atlanta Pop Festival. As you said, listening to WHERE he's playing the lick's in correlation to the chord really opened it up a lot more. It's just the key switches I don't understand, but I guess I'll have better understanding of that once I learn how Modulation to relative key works.

Thanks again
#5
benzel It's somewhat awkward to analyse Hendrix's work with typical diatonic theory - that's what made him so great - he does all kinds of crazy inventive things - which makes his tunes sound so "out" compared to everyone else. That's also why generic " Hendrix approach " lessons don't end up making much sense, unless they are limited to fills over chords.

He didn't have a grand "formula" - he did things on a per song basis mostly. That being said, there's all kinds of great things going on in those songs and some of them could be extrapolated to your own work.
#6
Quote by reverb66
benzel It's somewhat awkward to analyse Hendrix's work with typical diatonic theory - that's what made him so great - he does all kinds of crazy inventive things - which makes his tunes sound so "out" compared to everyone else. That's also why generic " Hendrix approach " lessons don't end up making much sense, unless they are limited to fills over chords.

He didn't have a grand "formula" - he did things on a per song basis mostly. That being said, there's all kinds of great things going on in those songs and some of them could be extrapolated to your own work.


Hmmm ... not too sure I agree with that. (Yes, he sounded different then, but his vocab was not that complex at all ... just really well played, phrased, and great sounding)
#7
benzel

That lesson seems fine to me. He's showing a nice simple approach ... he's not trying to copy Jimi note for note.

OP - Rob Chapman is just doing the following...

He's using the chords from the major key (E major key, here, so E, F#-, G#-, A, B, C#-), and then playing either a major or minor pentatonic (and sometimes a major or minor blues scale) as suits the chord. If the chord is major (E, A, B) he's playing E, A or B major pentatonic. If the chord is minor (F#-, G#-, C#-) he's playing F# or G# or C# minor pentatonic.

He's rootng the chords off the 6th string (fret 0, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9 ), and mostly then playing the appropriate pentatonic rooted from the same place, though sometimes he wanders into the next position.

But it works fine, and is good advice.
#9
Most of Hendrix's music is based on pretty straightforward chord changes. Hendrix is a very melodic player and uses that to fill out the trio's sound, so don't expect to hear him play plain old triads all that much. Listening to the bass will indicate more clearly what the chord is, and from there you can find the guitar chord and work out how Hendrix takes a melodic approach to his chords.
#10
Quote by cdgraves
Most of Hendrix's music is based on pretty straightforward chord changes. Hendrix is a very melodic player and uses that to fill out the trio's sound, so don't expect to hear him play plain old triads all that much. Listening to the bass will indicate more clearly what the chord is, and from there you can find the guitar chord and work out how Hendrix takes a melodic approach to his chords.


Hate to break this to ya fella but Hendrix died a while back ;-)