#1
Really basic question but it's been bothering me (I didn't take music lessons btw). In some piano sheets I would come across for example two tied quarter notes, and can't help but wonder why isn't it one half note instead, because they sound the same? Or do they? Am I missing something?
Come on, man.
#2
Depends where it is. If it is between the up beat of 2 and the down beat of 3, then it is because that is actually how you are meant to spell it. It is so the person sight reading it has a clear sense of where the beat is. I have also seen it used incorrectly in amateur scores, so it could that the engraver is just an idiot. Or a Sebelius/Finale n00b.

Edit: You need to give an example if you want me to know exactly what you are describing.
Last edited by GoldenGuitar at Aug 30, 2016,
#3
Quote by f1f2
Really basic question but it's been bothering me (I didn't take music lessons btw). In some piano sheets I would come across for example two tied quarter notes, and can't help but wonder why isn't it one half note instead, because they sound the same? Or do they? Am I missing something?
As GG says, it will sound the same as a half-note. The reason for writing it as two tied quarters will be either because it crosses a barline (starts on the last quarter of a bar, so there's simply no room for the half-note), or because it crosses beat 3 in a 4/4 bar - and it's important for the reader to see where beat 3 is; to feel the way the note hangs over across the beat. The same doesn't apply for beats 1 and 4. It's as if 4/4 is really two 2/4 bars joined together, and we need to preserve that half-way marker to appreciate the rhythm.
(There are some subtle rules about the tying of other note values - that you'd think could be expressed as a single note - but they're always to do with showing the underlying beat pattern, so you see how the notes fall relative to the beats.)
Last edited by jongtr at Aug 30, 2016,
#4
Ties are used for making the music easier to read. You can see much clearer where the beats are.

These are the same rhythm, but the latter one is much easier to read because you can see where the beats are.

Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Aug 30, 2016,
#5
Alright thanks for the explanation and patience guys, seems to me that it's indeed for the beatings (I can't sight-read, so...)
Come on, man.
#6
Mags, the first measure of that image gave me eye cancer.

f1f2: The best time to learn how to sight read is yesterday.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#7
Quote by Jet Penguin
Mags, the first measure of that image gave me eye cancer.


That was kind of the point.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
Quote by MaggaraMarine
That was kind of the point.
The point

Braille...

icwydt
#9
Quote by f1f2
Really basic question but it's been bothering me (I didn't take music lessons btw). In some piano sheets I would come across for example two tied quarter notes, and can't help but wonder why isn't it one half note instead, because they sound the same? Or do they? Am I missing something?


You wouldn't generally see that unless it extended past a single bar. It would be pointless to tie 2 quarter notes together and then play two, rather than have a half note and then 2 quarter notes, in a single measure. But if it begins in one measure and extends to another, then you might see a tie. I see that frequently where the tie goes a half note, and holds to the first beat of the following measure..

Ideally, written music should strive to concisely convey adequate information necessary for playing something.

Unlike the above sentence.

/irony

Best,

Sean