#1
I dont have electric guitar for now. I only have now is a classical guitar. Just for practice. Can I use it for practicing riffs, scales, arpeggios or even transcribe metal and rock songs? does it make any difference in feel when I apply what I've practice from classical guitar to electric guitar?
Last edited by ecko2k6 at Aug 31, 2016,
#4
Quote by ecko2k6
I dont have electric guitar for now. I only have now is a classical guitar. Just for practice. Can I use it for practicing riffs, scales, arpeggios or even transcribe metal and rock songs? does it make any difference in feel when I apply what I've practice from classical guitar to electric guitar?
There are problems / limitations with the concept.

In some ways you can help yourself, knowing the fret board, identifying power chords, playing scales and such..

Some people do have a fair amount of difficulty managing the different neck width from the classical to the electric. But touch can be a big problem going from acoustic. Perhaps more so with steel string acoustic, because of the very high string tension on them.

Ironically, to play metal requires the lightest touch of all guitar work. This assumes you want to learn to "shred".

So, the amp and your sense of tonality with it are producing the sound you want. Playing "unplugged" requires a healthy imagination to fix what you think you want to sound like in your head, as opposed to what's actually coming out og the guitar.

There are some tactics which could be helpful, but would require a stereo acoustic and amp, (or 2 amps). Obviously you're not at that stage of owning equipment yet to pull it off, but it's something to plan for. Even with that, you (meaning anybody) still lacks the necessary bodies and skills to pull off hard rock as it's intended.

The truth is, metal without drums and bass is sort of silly. As intricate as the rhythm tracks might be, they lack any punch acoustically.

So yes, you can practice metal on an acoustic guitar, but you lose the ability to produce the soundscape you might desire.

Before I forget, guitar picks are brootal on nylon strings...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 31, 2016,
#6
Quote by Tony Done
I'm fairly open-minded about it, because Yngwie M played an Ovation nylon string on "Trilogy". Maybe a plus if you are into neo-classical metal.


It's really completely different going that way. He is taking his electric chops to a classical. The classical (or any acoustic) lacks the compression of a distorted electric and so there is less noise. Learning to play metal on a classical would mean that you don't learn proper muting techniques that will be a necessity when you switch to a distorted electric. Ever hear an experienced guitarist play with heavy distortion for the first time after playing for 15-20 years? They sound like they've been playing for more like 15-20 weeks because they can't mute anything and all the noise comes through.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#7
theogonia777

Yes, I'm well aware of the problems associated with attack, sustain and string damping, and I have never advocated learning electric on any kind of acoustic. However, I can see a niche for acoustic in that particular genre - not as a substitute for electric, but as a complement to it..
#8
I suspect the observation that a classical guitar, with flat, wide fretboard and nylon strings, is less conducive to gaining skills translatable to the electric guitar than a steel strung acoustic guitar is very accurate. Though all guitars share some similarities, it strikes me that the classical guitar has less in common with electric guitars than a steel strung acoustic. Consider that the original electric guitars were steel strung acoustics with pickups added to them.
#9
Yup you can I know this from my experience
“Music is a necessity. After food, air, water and warmth, music is the next necessity of life.” - Keith Richards
#10
Quote by Tony Done
theogonia777

Yes, I'm well aware of the problems associated with attack, sustain and string damping, and I have never advocated learning electric on any kind of acoustic. However, I can see a niche for acoustic in that particular genre - not as a substitute for electric, but as a complement to it..


He's not looking for a substitute for recording music like what Yngwie does but rather for a substitute for practicing. Even practicing it is not useful since you are inadvertently practicing in a way that promotes poor technique.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#11
Meant for completely different playing techniques. You can however, practice on it just to get familiar with the chords and notes but you will have to convert the playing style. Classicals don't do well "slung down low", LOL!