#1
When it comes to gear and effects, I barely know shit. But I have a pretty specific idea in my head of how I want my tone to sound. I want the clear cut and bassy feel that thy art is murder has with their chugs ()
but also the grungy, evil feel black tongue has with their breakdowns (),
while having a tone that's still my own. I know these guys obviously have much better gear than I can afford, so I'm just asking for any info I can get to obtain a set up under say, $800, that can pull off this kind of tone. I'm also really not sure what kind of pedals to use for a modern deathcore/progressive kind of sound. I'm totally open to used gear too. Like I said I barely know shit so any input is much appreciated, thanks.
Last edited by FifthThirdBank at Sep 2, 2016,
#2
Any Tubescreamer-boosted Peavey 5150/6505 is going to be a step in the right direction. They're ubiquitous to the styles you're describing for a reason. They kick butt. They can also be bought used relatively cheaply. Some may say they're a bit generic and unadventurous these days, not because they sound bad, but because they've become the yardstick that almost every other high-gain amp is measured from. They're the 'safe' option of metal amps.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Sep 2, 2016,
#3
T00DEEPBLUE I actually know a dude with a 5150 and it's pretty killer. But what do you mean by "tubescreamer-boosted"? and what's the difference between a 5150 and a 6505?
#4
Time to drop some common knowledge.
Quote by FifthThirdBank
T00DEEPBLUE I actually know a dude with a 5150 and it's pretty killer. But what do you mean by "tubescreamer-boosted"?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibanez_Tube_Screamer

One of the most popular OD's of all time. It's common practice to put a Tubescreamer in front of an amp like a 6505 to be used as a clean boost (set to very low gain and max level) that tightens the bass and boost the mids to help the amp cut in a band mix.
and what's the difference between a 5150 and a 6505?

The name. The amp was originally endorsed by Van Halen when it was first produced but the name had to be changed when Eddie was no longer endorsing Peavey as he holds the rights to that name.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Sep 2, 2016,
#5
There are also some design differences, as I remember the 5150 has a bit more of a saggy feel due to different transformers, and there was some small circuit changes in other places. I am not that interested in either of these amps so I didn't really follow up but there are some small design changes and the big one was switch from USA to Chinese production with cheaper parts. The new combos have a butchered fx loop AFAIK.
#6
I've always understood that the MIA 6505s were IDENTICAL to the 5150s. Now the new MIC ones....
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#7
Quote by dementiacaptain
I've always understood that the MIA 6505s were IDENTICAL to the 5150s. Now the new MIC ones....


There were some circuit tweaks on these as well, something small in the tonestack and eq, don't remember exactly but it was there. Had a buddy that was the encyclopedia of these amps and I remember him mentioning it.
#8
Interesting. The transformer change is honestly the most surprising. Either way I can't imagine it makes a ton of tonal difference, but its good to know.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#9
Borrow someone's 10-band EQ pedal *or* nab a wah pedal or one of the "parked wah" pedals on the market (or build your own).
A lot of the differences in the tones you'll hear between bands has to do with what section of the mids is being emphasized.
These will help you find the sound; then duplicate it with what you have now.
Bear in mind that the "bassy" part of what you hear has something to do with the fact that they have a bass player and a kick drum producing the bottom end.
Last edited by dspellman at Sep 2, 2016,
#10
Quote by dspellman
Borrow someone's 10-band EQ pedal *or* nab a wah pedal or one of the "parked wah" pedals on the market (or build your own).
A lot of the differences in the tones you'll hear between bands has to do with what section of the mids is being emphasized.
These will help you find the sound; then duplicate it with what you have now.
Bear in mind that the "bassy" part of what you hear has something to do with the fact that they have a bass player and a kick drum producing the bottom end.


These are very good points. I've known many a guitar player try in vain to get a super thumpin' sound out of their rig only to realize that it simply can't be done on traditional amps and still maintain clarity and tightness.

EQ pedals are always a good buy for any setup. You might do anything drastic with it, but tweaking the sliders just a little bit can take a good guitar tone over-the-top to perfect.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#11
Quote by dementiacaptain
Interesting. The transformer change is honestly the most surprising. Either way I can't imagine it makes a ton of tonal difference, but its good to know.


Essentially little differences in tone, there are easy mods to get 6505 to 5150 spec if needed. I'd guess they mainly did them so EVH won't sue.