Poll: ??????
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18 is usually too young to know what you want to do
14 47%
18 is not usually too young to know what you want to do
4 13%
academic hipsterfucks should all be taken to the gulag
13 43%
fourth poll option
13 43%
Voters: 30.
#1
Do you think that there's a problem with an 18-year old 'running' to university? Have you had the problem that what university did for you, as well as educating you on a subject, was show you your real dedication? Putting 'university culture' aside for a moment, is 18-20 simply too young to go into an undergraduate degree with a decent level of surety?

what are your thoughts and experiences relating to this? Did you go to university, and did you want to change courses? If so, did you, and did you regret your choice?
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Last edited by Banjocal at Sep 4, 2016,
#2
Yeah it's way too early really but then again it's not early enough for some people because education really doesn't suit them

longing rusted furnace daybreak seventeen benign nine homecoming one freight car
#3
I took two years off after high school, mostly to do drugs. I slowly eased my way back into school and after discovering what I want I came back stronger than ever. Good gpa, great university, full on scholarships and all.

I think it's important to take time off

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#4
I wish I'd done a biochem degree instead of pure chemistry which is annoying

longing rusted furnace daybreak seventeen benign nine homecoming one freight car
#5
I know this is the case where I live. If you don't go to school right away, you're a chump. I definitely should have taken some time off because I was too busy dicking around the first two and half years of college.
Free Ali
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#6
I went to college at 16 which didn't work out (for multiple reasons) and then I had to make a new decision at 17.

7/8 years later and I'm still not sure whether I could have chosen something better (perhaps even sticking with the first course), but I feel like I have learned a lot. Not just in terms of what I studied and am now doing for a living, but just regarding learning in general.

I don't think late teens for most people are a time in which they can say "yes, this is exactly the right thing", but it's all the more important that schools and colleges promote an attitude of learning form what you're doing regardless what you're doing specifically.
#7
Quote by EndTheRapture51
I wish I'd done a biochem degree instead of pure chemistry which is annoying

Why's that? I'm a biochem major at the moment and I could probably double major in chem too.

Also college sux
Kinda wish I'd have joined the military first
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#8
Quote by Cardbored
Why's that? I'm a biochem major at the moment and I could probably double major in chem too.

Also college sux
Kinda wish I'd have joined the military first


Idk the sciences for me were way different from my expectations

i thought chemistry would have more overlap with biology and biochem than with physics

instead i ended up taking courses in quantum mechanics lol

im in medical engineering now anyway

but i think id rather be working for a big pharma company and tihnk a biochem degree would've been more "me" and come more naturally to me than all the crazy physics shit i ended up struggling with

longing rusted furnace daybreak seventeen benign nine homecoming one freight car
#9
I got my AA in general studies at 19, and then an AAS with a focus in radiology at 23. I took a year off in the AAS to relax because I was burnt out, and I got a certification in phlebotomy while I was on my year of sabbatical. When I went back to do clinicals in the CT department I was one of the only people in the hospital certified to put in IVs. I'm starting full time at an orthopedic clinic on Tuesday (super excited). At first I was going to go into Electrical Engineering but I was about to get married and that was a longer program than the radiography degree, so I swapped schools. Then I got broken up with, but I loved what I was doing with radiography, so I stuck with it. I love it, and there's a lot of room for growth within that field so it worked out for me.
My little brother got his AA at 20 and EMS certification at 21, and worked for a few months. Right now, he's in the Army and finishing up his AIT for radio repair dude.
I think that it really depends on what you want to do, depending on higher education. Most of the people who graduate from university now are getting degrees in womens studies and underwater basketweaving and can't find a job. They basically become highly educated baristas or burgerflippers.
They don't think it be like it is, but it do.
#10
Who says you need to know when you're 18? You can still be exploratory with your interests for the majority of your time in most universities without committing to a major/degree field. Even in ones that start earlier, there is still some leeway.

I think 18 is plenty old enough. The idea that you should strive to be 100% confident in your career or degree choice is a terrible illusion and presents a false dichotomy of either floundering in academia or being successful.
My God, it's full of stars!
#12
Quote by Banjocal
Do you think that there's a problem with an 18-year old 'running' to university? Have you had the problem that what university did for you, as well as educating you on a subject, was show you your real dedication? Putting 'university culture' aside for a moment, is 18-20 simply too young to go into an undergraduate degree with a decent level of surety?

what are your thoughts and experiences relating to this? Did you go to university, and did you want to change courses? If so, did you, and did you regret your choice?


I think this premise is misguided. After HS you essentially have 4 choices. Military, join the workforce at entry level, trade school, or go on to college. Pick one. I don't think college is for everybody but if you are going to go, go right after HS graduation and do not delay. If you wait, life gets in the way, kids happen, and completing a degree gets exponentially more difficult. Get it done right away. Can't afford university? Skip the student loan nonsense and go to community college for your Gen Ed. Good grades there will open doors to Universities all over.

The idea that you must choose your life path at 18 is also nonsense. Roughly 10% will have a strong desire to enter a specific field of study like medicine or engineering and the rest will get a degree in something that interest's them without intent to make it their life's work. Get the degree, make good connections with other students, take an internship in summer and make good connections out in the workforce while going to college. At the end of 4 years you will have a good idea where you would like to land. A basic plan that is still plenty flexible to change later as circumstances change. The point is, when you get a degree and develop good relationships with the community, you create lots of choices. The more education you get, the more choices you have. It really is that simple.

JMHO
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Sep 4, 2016,
#13
I should have taken a year off before entering uni. because I didn't know what I wanted to study at all. Most people just follow the herd and go to college right after graduating highschool, and many of these kids drop out because they don't know what they want to do.

Most kids are pretty unmotivated these days anyways, I made a thread on a this a while back. They're pretty clueless. Even people that end up graduating uni with buisness degrees and whatnot are generally pretty unsure what kind of work they're gonna be doing.
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#14
I didn't really know what field I wanted to be in. I was deciding between Psych and English so I went with what I was better at, which was English. I ended up making the right choice in terms of what I enjoy and benefited from most, but I've also seen a lot of people rush into higher education in an academic subject when they should have focused on a trade or something similar. I think we should prepare young people for leaving high school a lot better. College seems to be the default for most people when a lot of them aren't going to be suited for it. A trade based skill shouldn't be less prestigious than an academic field.
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#15
Everyone I knew in school was going straight to uni so I kind of thought it was the thing to do. Never really considered other options. My choice of subject was a bit of a last-minute decision. Choosing your major seems like a huge decision to make when you're 18, but really any decision still narrows your options. If I had chosen trade school or an apprenticeship I would be having the same doubts that I have now (except I'd probably be employed).
#16
BladeSlinger

I agree man

I have friends my age that didn't graduate college and theyre still making like 30-40/hr as machinists and they send me snapchats of their work. They tell me it's piss easy, and they work with lots of foreign people so it's chill.

Trades are better than a lot of degrees, they take less time to get educated, and some of them pay pretty damn well for the type of work they do.
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
There shall be a stop to this madness. The battle is not over. My tasty licks aren't going anywhere.

Quote by The_Blode
^ I've just realised if you say Simple Plan's 2011 effort "Get Your Heart On!" really fast in a Southern American accent, it sounds gross. . .like sexual gross!

Quote by Necroheadbanger
Hello.
I'm looking for professional bongo-ists and triangle-ists to make a Progressive Technical Brutal Death Metal band
(will be called AxOxJxLxAxIxVxXxUxWxZxQxUxRxWxGxJxSxAxLxKxMxNxHxUxGxAxAxWxVxCxBxZxVx)
(Don't even ask what it means)


https://soundcloud.com/95dank



Last edited by k.lainad at Sep 4, 2016,
#17
It's not that I don't like what I do, I fact I really like it and somehow I'm supposedly pretty good at it going off my grades so far, but there is definitely the realisation that a media degree probably isn't going to do me any favours, especially when I don't have a strong portfolio of production work because it seems my best strengths are academic writing and analysis rather than getting anything actually made.

It's just that I left college thinking university would teach me so much about production, but so far it just hasn't and I have a feeling I'll probably finish uni with the same low self esteem I had when I finished college. So in other words, expecting to learn how to make things in university was never realistic. The real world is for that.

I wasn't cut out for STEM subjects, maybe if I spent many years working on the basics to build my way up to learn how to then that could have been more beneficial for me and the rest of the world.

And I kinda disagree about going to uni for dipping toes, that's one helluva expensive way to get your toes wet.
Dance in the moonlight my old friend twilight


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#18
Don't really think I can use my personal experience since I've been very sure about what I wanted to do and study (at uni) since I was like 14, then I did so and ended up having a great time. Kind of conflicts with the usual college stories thrown around by many.

I agree that having our culture "force" people to go to college at 18 years old is not that great. There isn't much difference in going to college at 18, or 20, or hell even 25 or more if you want. You can also just not go to college, if what you want to do has no academy or what is presented to you doesn't really suit you.
#19
I think it's worth mentioning this for the people starting/still in education:

A university degree does not make you qualified for a job. You will not be taught everything. You are not entitled to a position in your chosen field. A degree is an absolute minimum these days and you will be judged by how proactive you are outside of the required coursework. Work on personal projects. Learn outside of class. Build a portfolio. Find summer work placements in your field. Try to secure a job or internship before you graduate. Don't assume you'll work things out later. Don't make the mistakes I made.
#20
Quote by k.lainad
BladeSlinger

I agree man

I know dudes my age making like 30/hr as machinists and they send me snapchats of their work. They tell me it's piss easy, and they work with lots of foreign people so it's chill.

Trades are better than a lot of degrees, they take less time to get involved, and some of them pay pretty damn well for the type of work they do.
One of my friends is a machinist, and he makes good money, partially from budgeting skills and partially from the pay itself. He gets a set amount of food money for when he has to travel (which he does a lot) so he spends the bare minimum and eats basic stuff the whole time. Pockets the rest.

Higher education was definitely the right choice for my sister and I, and we'll probably continue to get degrees over time, assuming there's money to. I just dig learning stuff, and I can always fall back on teaching if I absolutely have to. Ideally, I'll be working in higher ed administration and maybe teach a course or two when needed. I seem to meet a lot of people who do get degrees without really engaging with their material. Like, they're not excited about it; it's simply a means to an end. That sounds so terrible to me.

Quote by Nero Galon
It's not that I don't like what I do, I fact I really like it and somehow I'm supposedly pretty good at it going off my grades so far, but there is definitely the realisation that a media degree probably isn't going to do me any favours, especially when I don't have a strong portfolio of production work because it seems my best strengths are academic writing and analysis rather than getting anything actually made.

It's just that I left college thinking university would teach me so much about production, but so far it just hasn't and I have a feeling I'll probably finish uni with the same low self esteem I had when I finished college. So in other words, expecting to learn how to make things in university was never realistic. The real world is for that.

I wasn't cut out for STEM subjects, maybe if I spent many years working on the basics to build my way up to learn how to then that could have been more beneficial for me and the rest of the world.

And I kinda disagree about going to uni for dipping toes, that's one helluva expensive way to get your toes wet.
I don't think you should underestimate writing and analysis skills, even if you aren't as good at your primary skills. The thing is, language is often taken for granted because it's so natural to us. While tutoring people, I radically changed sections by shifting a few words or asking them to explain their reasoning behind small phrases. Those little changes had a ripple effect which improved the paper over all. Sure, most of those were basic papers, but there were also med school applications and grants in there as well. I've had internships were I was a glorified spelling and grammar checker. Some of these people had Master's degree in their field of choice, but their ability to write cogently outside of that field was pretty weak. I worked on basically anything involving text to review it, offer suggestions, or draft new versions. I was basically a force multiplier by applying my skills in academic writing and analysis. The small improvements across departments had a larger cumulative effect, and the employees openly appreciated my assistance because that shit was just tedious to them.

Basically, don't sell yourself short if you have a skill. Find ways to get stronger at that while also improving in other areas, and you'll have an advantage over your more typical peers. I'm sure they'll be pretty abundant, but your combination of skills might synergize in ways that their skills don't.
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Last edited by BladeSlinger at Sep 4, 2016,
#21
A 4 year degree is definitely not for everyone. A lot of people will find more satisfaction and success as a machinist, welder, in automotive technology, rigger, merchant marine, truck driver, heavy equipment operator etc. All of those trades have jobs available now for qualified people who have been through the training. The work is steady and the pay is good.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#22
I don't think knowing what you want to do should be a pre-req. for going to college. Of course it's understandable, with ludicrous tuition & impending debt, that kids don't want to go to college & dick around & take 5 or 6 years to graduate. But there's something to be said for wandering.

Of course (full disclosure) I pussyfooted around as undeclared before becoming an English major, then went to grad school, & am now going for a teaching certification, so I'm not rolling in dough-stacks here -- & I always had a financial safety net via parental support, so what the fuck do I know about life decisions.

But you know, "they put up a poster sayin' 'we earn more than you!'" -- "we need welders not philosophers" -- some loser who couldn't even win his home state -- sad! -- twenty years of schooling & they put you on the day shift -- smh.
#23
With that said, I don't think there's a problem with kids "running" off to university (at least they are the active agent in that scenario); I think there's a problem with kids being shuffled off to university just because that's what people do -- wake up sheeple!
#24
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A 4 year degree is definitely not for everyone. A lot of people will find more satisfaction and success as a machinist, welder, in automotive technology, rigger,


Had to read this twice there.
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#25
Hehe,

A certified rigger works cranes, oil platforms, shipyards, freight train loading yards, and performance venues. They make about $40k here in Calif and they are in demand.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#26
I think, rather one shouldn't go if they don't know. There are other options that don't involve massive debt, or allow you to explore more options without needing to stay in a set course/number of years.

But, the reverse of that is at least in the US, we hold students back with our schooling. More people could've ready for advanced learning at a younger age. We really could use more innovation and choice when it comes to education, as well as adjusting our expectations.


"Every day I wonder how many things I am dead wrong about."
#27
Have a mature student friend, and also my brother at 29 is starting his HNC and there are pros and cons to starting late.

My friend is experienced with what work is like in the real world, my brother too. They know they want better and they believe what they're doing with education will give them it. They've had more time to develop a work ethic. I've attended almost every single lecture and seminar in the past 2 years and the attendance among most students is either extremely poor to the point where you expect very little from them or borderline a cause for some concern.

The pros of starting young however is that if you have enough support to study full time then you won't have the same commitments to handle compared to someone who's been out in the real world and attached certain commitments to themselves. My brother cannot afford to go full time in education so he has to only do a one day a week course for a few years. Also for mature students, for better or worse, they don't get the same experience the younger students get socially since they can feel like they're too old to be living such lifestyles.
Dance in the moonlight my old friend twilight


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#28
If I could go back again, I'd definitely have either:

a) chosen a different degree (as fun as it was, Music isn't going to open many career opportunities)

b) not gone altogether

So yeah, I'd say 18 is definitely too young. There was even a pressure at my school too to go straight to university, and anyone who expressed a desire to take a gap year was seen as wasting time.

Saying that, at the time I went university fees were about £3000ish per year over here, whereas they're now about £9000 a year. For that kind of money, I don't think many degrees are worth doing unless you have a very specific career field you wish to enter afterwards.
#30
i never went to university, it seemed rather pointless at the time with my course options, a general lack of direction and some poor choices pretty much fucked me over, that coupled with the downturn of the economy meant i was in a pretty hopeless situation and i still am really. still don't know what i want to do with my life, all i know is if i ever find out i'll be much more committed to it than i would have been otherwise, i suppose that's the only advantage of waiting really
#31
I dont know what I want to do. I didn't know what I wanted to do at 18 and nothing has changed now.

Class is expensive tho. 12 hundred for the two classes I'm taking this semester.

I'm thinking music ed or creative writing idk. Not super hyped or anything.

Maybe I should justbdo the trade thing
#32
going at 18 with little concept of money and no work ethic resulted in my current predicament.

thank you family for pushing me into taking out a loan.
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#33
Quote by Dreadnought
Who says you need to know when you're 18? You can still be exploratory with your interests for the majority of your time in most universities without committing to a major/degree field. Even in ones that start earlier, there is still some leeway.

I think 18 is plenty old enough. The idea that you should strive to be 100% confident in your career or degree choice is a terrible illusion and presents a false dichotomy of either floundering in academia or being successful.
that's a benefit of the US academic system but generally in the UK, once you pick a field that's it. Student finance is also limited to 4 years so if you don't complete your undergraduate degree in under that most people are generally screwed. So you can only really change degrees in the first year, any time after that and it's too late.

On top of that you're actually choosing your degree subject at 16 when you pick your a-levels. You can't go generally into a science field if you only studied humanities subjects at a-levels, and often universities will have strict criteria on what A-levels subjects students need to get on the course. For example, to study history or archaeology at some universities they expect applicants to have studied Latin as well as history. Latin isn't exactly taught at most state schools...

So yeah, 18 is an ok age to choose but most British students are choosing at 16 and that's not enough time.

I think if I could give advice to young Brits thinking on uni, I'd say go for it if you're really interested in a certain subject or you know you need a degree for the career you want (doctor, lawyer, engineer etc). Otherwise just find yourself a good apprenticeship. Uni is fun but in the jmcurrent job market it's not necessarily worth it.
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