#1
so I was playing with some arpeggio shapes, attempting to create new ones in the process, and came across these two. Would calling these chords sus2#5 or b5 be proper? I attempted to look up the names but have not seen anything regarding the sharp or flattened fifth.

For context I have added a Gp4 file of the two, resolving to E minor.
Attachments:
sus arpeggio.gp4
Gear:
Dean RC7X (Bareknuckle Coldsweat pickups)
Ibanez Rg2570Z (Bareknuckle Juggernaughts)
Schecter KM-6
Schecter Hellraiser Hybrid 7 String
Engl Powerball II
Orange PPC412
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#2
The first one seems, to me, like it would be a C major triad with a flat 5th/sharp 4th since it contains the notes C, E, and F#/Gb (could easily be called a C7b5 instead, but it doesn't have a 7th). The second one could be called a B7 since it has the notes B, D#, and A. This would make it a VI, V, i progression in E minor, which is why it resolves so nicely.

Thought, with just the arpeggios, that would be my guess on what chords they're actually outlining.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#3
No, because then you'll probably have chosen the wrong note as root.

First one is F#m7b5 (F# half-diminished), second is B7 (shell, sans 5), then E minor.

simple iiø7-V7-i

edit: the first one doesn't have the third, but it's still acting as a predominant function chord.
#4
It's all about context. It's all about chord functions. As said above, it's a ii-V-i in E minor. In some other context the same chord could have a different name.

But yeah, if the chord name is something like sus2b5, it usually means that you have chosen the wrong root.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#5
Okay, so these chords don't really exist? In terms of music theory, I mean the names would be wrong. Would there ever be a time when a Sus2 b5 (or #5) would be used?
Gear:
Dean RC7X (Bareknuckle Coldsweat pickups)
Ibanez Rg2570Z (Bareknuckle Juggernaughts)
Schecter KM-6
Schecter Hellraiser Hybrid 7 String
Engl Powerball II
Orange PPC412
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#6
Quote by amonamarthmetal
Okay, so these chords don't really exist? In terms of music theory, I mean the names would be wrong. Would there ever be a time when a Sus2 b5 (or #5) would be used?


That would be strange.

Let's look at one, C sus 2 #5 C D G#

I'd look at that as a harmonic cluster.

It could represent a C augmented, but there's no major 3rd.

Other than a C and G#, there are no triadic relationships between any of these notes, Unless you want to argue a G# diminshed between the G# and D notes (But I don't)

C Aug sus2? I guess if you had to name it, using C as your root, that's as good as any.

Best,

Sean
#7
amonamarthmetal

There are a load of chords that cannot be explained by the major/minor system. But they exist, and sound great.

Sean0913

In the example C D G#, in isolation, just looking at the semitone distances, C -> G# is 8 semitones. (minor 6th ... ignoring pitch names. Upper pitch is interval root, and as strongest interval in that group (cf maj 2nd and a tritone), is the root of that clusterr, giving you a maj3rd and a b5 from that root.

If you play it as

1: -
2: -
3: -
4: 0 1
5: 3
6: 4

You can hear the root quite clearly.

It's a triad, but hasn't got a standard name.
#8
In Esus2#5 you won't hear the E as the root. Depending on the context, I can hear it as either C"add#11" (either C7#11 or Cmaj7#11, but it doesn't have a seventh in it) or F#m7b5. If E is the bass note, I would probably hear it as F#m7b5.

A sus2b5 always sounds like a dominant 7th chord with the 7th in the bass.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
If you write the notes out:

C-D-Gb ("sus2b5")

should be enharmonically respelled as C-D-F#. (The note usually resolves upwards.) Unless you add more notes (like Cmaj9#11, C-E-G-B-D-F#), it's naturally going to sound like D7/C.

C-D-G# ("sus2#5")

should be enharmonically respelled as C-D-Ab. (The note usually resolves downwards. Also, with tritones, they'd tend to resolve in opposite directions, so D-G# would go outwards as an aug4 to C#-A O.o.) Unless you add more notes (like C-Eb-B-D-Ab, natural resolution to C-Eb-C-C/Eb-G. A similar suspension happens in the beginning of "Pathétique".), it's going to sound like Dm7b5/C. Otherwise, I can see Jerry's example happening (Ab-C-D), but that's not so much a chord in itself than a non-chord tone D waiting to resolve to either C or (more likely) Eb.

Chords have been a thing for a long while, and the building blocks were thirds and fifths. However, thirds most often take precedence, and ultimately, the naming will depend on context.

-> in very rare cases, the 5 can be altered as a 5.

Diminished: 1-b3-b5
Augmented: 1-3-#5

However, this is relatively rare in the context of all music.
---
SUSPENSIONS

Suspensions are supposed to be special notes that are held over or replayed and require resolution in order to uncover a major or minor chord.

C-F-G to C-E(b)-G: 4-3 suspension
C-D-G to C-E(b)-G: 2-3 suspension (upwards is called retardation)
C-E(b)-G-D to C-E(b)-G-C: 9-8 suspension
C-E(b)-G-B to C-E(b)-G-C: 7-8 retardation

you can always combine these, like C-D-G-B to C-E(b)-G-C, and there are a few more, particularly in contrapuntal thinking (before chords came counterpoint); however these are the most common that I've seen.