#1
I have an old Ibanez RG with a floating bridge. The two screws the bridge pivots on are sagging forward and its affecting the action. The guitar isn't that great, but it has sentimental value and id like to fix it. I was thinking of either filling it in and getting a fixed bridge, or put in a piece of hardwood and re-drill the screws.

Ive yet to find a video/article online which addresses this problem specifically. I've attached pics

Suggestions?

Thanks!!!



#2
I've seen the screws continue to sag forward and eventually crash through the "wall" between themselves and the bridge pickup, depositing the bridge into the bridge pickup's rout. Sorta depends on the dimensions of that wall and the type of wood involved and, of course, how hard the trem has been used. It's usually not (surprisingly enough) the string tension that causes this. StewMac has addressed the fix for this, as I recall, and there have been some blogs that have carried photos of it. For the fix, you might email Gary Brawer at Brawer.com. It's not all that unusual an occurrence, so you should be able to get information from the better-known repair people, many of whom have run into it.
#3
I think Stewmac/Dan Erlewine is where I learned this, too. You install hardwood dowel sections and drill new holes into them. I think it mostly happens with softer woods, like mahogany and basswood.
#4
You can do two things. Drill it out larger and install a hardwood dowel, then drill and redo the screws.

Or put in a piece of a toothpick and replace the screw. Dip the toothpick in wood glue first, give it time (overnight) to set with the screw in place before putting it under pressure with strings on. A match stick can work for larger holes, or a very small wood dowel, you can get them as small as 1/8 inch. I've used this for guitar strap pegs, neck bolts, door hinges, all sorts of wood work. I think the strap pegs in every one of my guitars have been done. Last time I did my strat was 10 years ago, it's just now starting to work loose again.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#5
The bridge being under constant tension (I'm not an expert on this trem type, I guess it's a pivot screw, though), I wouldn't expect the toothpick to do the job. For a strap button, it's as shim vs taking a dynamic load.
#6
Quote by bangbang11
The bridge being under constant tension (I'm not an expert on this trem type, I guess it's a pivot screw, though), I wouldn't expect the toothpick to do the job. For a strap button, it's as shim vs taking a dynamic load.


A toothpick isn't going to cut it, you're right.