#1
I noticed a small bit of pitting on my (ebony) fretboard today and have no idea how it got there. All I can think of is that I failed to take good enough care of the wood for too long and it got too dry. I've been in the habit lately of applying some cleaning and conditioning oil to my fretboard when it looks and feels like it's starting to dry out, but I've never noticed this before today. Luckily it doesn't affect playing in any way, but I can't un-see it.

Is there anyway it can be repaired or am I just going to have to live with it? Included is a picture. I apologize for the photo quality. My phone's camera isn't the greatest and I don't own a real camera.

My username lies. I play an LTD.
Last edited by I play G and L at Sep 6, 2016,
#3
Strange. It was showing up on my end.

I uploaded to a different image hosting site. Is it appearing now?
My username lies. I play an LTD.
#4
It has nothing whatever to do with "conditioning." You're off the hook.

It was caused by the original fretting procedure and just hid out until recently.
It can be repaired by combining some dust from the same material as the fretboard with some epoxy or superglue and then inserting that into the hole. You can finish up by sanding it down flat and no one will be the wiser. There are instructions for doing this on StewMac.com
#6
Does it affect the playability? If not, consider it something that makes that guitar yours. keeping your guitar free of dings and scratches is impossible.
#7
I can see it now, thanks. I make black faux ebony bog by mixing slow setting epoxy with black tempera (kid's powder) paint. It is very tough and easy to work with. For a small blem like that, the epoxy on its own might sufficient, as it sets almost transparent.
#8
Quote by esky15
Does it affect the playability? If not, consider it something that makes that guitar yours. keeping your guitar free of dings and scratches is impossible.


In some cases, that's true. OTOH, I have guitars from 1939 and 1948 that get played (not infrequently) that are fairly ding-free. That's not true of the fretboard, of course, and I'm coming up on a refret on the 1948 guitar. I'm not really convinced that dings and scratches "make a guitar yours." The fretboard pit wasn't the TS's fault. It's a bit like owning a car. I've seen 10-year-old cars that look like brand new because the owners were meticulous (and, probably, lucky). And other cars of the same age that were trashed. Mileage similar between the two. I guess that's why they have "average" resale values...
#9
Quote by dspellman
In some cases, that's true. OTOH, I have guitars from 1939 and 1948 that get played (not infrequently) that are fairly ding-free. That's not true of the fretboard, of course, and I'm coming up on a refret on the 1948 guitar. I'm not really convinced that dings and scratches "make a guitar yours." The fretboard pit wasn't the TS's fault. It's a bit like owning a car. I've seen 10-year-old cars that look like brand new because the owners were meticulous (and, probably, lucky). And other cars of the same age that were trashed. Mileage similar between the two. I guess that's why they have "average" resale values...


Fair enough. Certainly stuff being well taken care of over decades can withstand the test of time, cars and guitars alike, but there is bound to be some wear and tear if it is used.