#1
Hey guys,

so a bandmate has a bit of a problem with one of his cabs.

He bought an old 50 watt marshall plexi to replace his traynor 80 watt and runs them through a mesa boogie 2x12 with 2 vintage 30 16ohm (60 watts each, I think) in them (he runs them through the 8ohm output of whichever amp he's using at that moment)

Today he plugs in his new/old plexi and after the first or second song, we realize there is a buzzing coming from his left speaker (when you're looking from the front.) It gets more obvious when you play bassy stuff or with distortion but it's mostly always there.

At first we thought it had something to do with the marshall head so we plugged the traynor back into it. The buzz was still there but much quieter. This led us to believe that maybe the problem was there all along but we just never noticed it... The Marshall is a lot bassier, to be sure.

Do you guys have any ideas what it could be?

Is there any way an 80 watt traynor or 50 watt marshall can blow a speaker cab correctly wired with distortion for example? Sometimes he uses a lower octave on his whammy but infrequently. I just verified and he doesn't use the whammy anymore.

We'd appreciate any clues!

Thanks!
Last edited by flexiblemile at Sep 7, 2016,
#2
Sure, sometimes stuff breaks. Octave pedals are pretty well known for damaging speakers if cranked up. Driving a speaker well below its free air resonant frequency is like driving a car well past redline. Somethings gonna blow.

Time for a re-cone which is probably 1/2 of full replacement cost.
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#3
make sure all of the screws are tightened on the cab.
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#4
Quote by Cajundaddy
Sure, sometimes stuff breaks. Octave pedals are pretty well known for damaging speakers if cranked up. Driving a speaker well below its free air resonant frequency is like driving a car well past redline. Somethings gonna blow.

Time for a re-cone which is probably 1/2 of full replacement cost.

One of my EVM-12Ls in a Thiele cab is still going like a champ with the coffee filter and Elmer's glue temp fix on the ripped cone. May work in the V30 unless the coils are borked.
#5
Quote by Cajundaddy
Sure, sometimes stuff breaks. Octave pedals are pretty well known for damaging speakers if cranked up. Driving a speaker well below its free air resonant frequency is like driving a car well past redline. Somethings gonna blow.

Time for a re-cone which is probably 1/2 of full replacement cost.


Thank you for your answer. Actually the more I think about it, the more I think he stopped using his octave down pedal since I joined the band (as a bassist.) I'll clear this with him and report back here.


Quote by trashedlostfdup
make sure all of the screws are tightened on the cab.


We checked this, they all seem tight and the buzz is clearly coming from one of the speakers. thanks though


Quote by Ippon
One of my EVM-12Ls in a Thiele cab is still going like a champ with the coffee filter and Elmer's glue temp fix on the ripped cone. May work in the V30 unless the coils are borked.


Could you give me more info on this fix? Also how do I spot a ripped cone? I know it'll be obvious if the rip is huge but supposing it's very small?

How does one distinguish between a ripped cone and a borked coil?


EDIT: I can confirm that the whammy octave down was not used with the new cab
Last edited by flexiblemile at Sep 7, 2016,
#6
Here's something to consider: I had a similar problem due to a poor connection to the speakers. Check and make sure the connections from the speaker to the input on the cab are all solid.
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