#1
Hello folks,

Percussive Finger-style or just Regular Finger-style is probably one of my favorites things on guitar. Alas, i've actually started with an electric guitar rather than Acoustic and know very little info on what to look for.

I have been saving up some coins, have realistic around 350-400 euros right now, and maybe 500-600 euros, wishfully thinking.

So yeah, i would appreciate some guidance.
Either Semi-Acoustic or Acoustic (more incline to semi) nothing fancy, maybe from some streetplaying from time to time.

Plus would a regular electric guitar amp, work fine with a semi-acoustic? Or do i have to look into something specific, if so what would u suggest as a starting point for me to look into.

Thank you for your time and sorry for the newbness
Last edited by renatofrmsantos at Sep 7, 2016,
#3
Honestly, I'm not an expert, I can just tell you my experience.
I have an electro-acoustic Ibanez, I paid around 250€ for it. I don't know how the prices go where you're from, but I'm satisfied with this guitar. I'm also using it just for fun & in company. In that price range, you can get Ibanez, Epiphone, solid Yamaha... It would all fit your needs. As for the amp, I use this bad practice amp I have, if I really need to. However, there are specific amps. I don't know much about them, unfortunately.
#4
I wouldn't call myself an expert, but I've been around the block a few times with acoustics.

I used an electric guitar amp (Peavey classic 30, Fender blues deluxe) for gigging for years, no problem, I liked the somewhat mellow tones and lack of jangle. However, you either need a magnetic soundhole pickup or the piezo system has to have a preamp/buffer of some kind. - Most electric acoustics come with a built-in preamp these days.

Popular makes in that price range inlcude Yamaha and Recording King, but there are plenty of good choices these days. Try as many as you can, and remember that string age and set up, both of which are easily fixable, affect tone and feel. In fact, it is a good idea to budget for a set up.
#5
I honestly can say that I hear the difference on a quality Spanish built acoustic guitar. If you can go for a one of the lower Manuel Rodriguez:
https://www.thomann.de/de/manuel_rodriguez_caballero_11_cut_nogal_nt.htm
or these:
https://www.thomann.de/de/takamine_gc5ce_natural.htm
https://www.thomann.de/de/cordoba_c7.htm

I also find the Yamahas quite capable in the 400-500 euro range.
Last edited by diabolical at Sep 7, 2016,
#6
Quote by renatofrmsantos
...[ ]....Percussive Finger-style or just Regular Finger-style is probably one of my favorites things on guitar. Alas, i've actually started with an electric guitar rather than Acoustic and know very little info on what to look for.
Are you looking for a steel or nylon strung instrument?

Quote by renatofrmsantos
Plus would a regular electric guitar amp, work fine with a semi-acoustic? Or do i have to look into something specific, if so what would u suggest as a starting point for me to look into.
For steel string acoustics, IMO, electric amps are superior. Acoustic amps are basically set up as little PA systems. So, if you're going to sing along with amplified guitar, the acoustic amp might be the better choice, (at least eventually). With a 2 channel electric amp you can accomplish something similar. I can tell you an 8" portable jobbie won't give you what you need in that capacity..

Your electric / acoustic interests are best served with amps which have good cleans, in both channels.
#7
Quote by Captaincranky


For steel string acoustics, IMO, electric amps are superior. .


The implication being that an acoustic amp would be better for a nylon string. I've never tried it, but it makes a lot of sense to me. Nylon strings are often fairly mellow, and could benefit from the more hi-fi like qualities of an acoustic amp.
#8
I've used acoustic electrics through standard guitar amps for years, works fairly well. At one time I was using my Takamine through one channel of my Super Reverb and the electrics through the other, just get a sound hole baffle or it will tend to feedback at loud stage volume. I've been running the Takamine through the PA system lately, that works just as well.

I tried an acoustic amp a few years ago, shop owner let me test it at a gig, should have bought it but it was not loud enough for onstage wit that band, I wish I had it now. It did a good job but was difficult to dial in the sound, had to run it through the line out into the PA for enough volume, low wattage amp. I still wish I Had gone ahead and bought it, probably would be great for what my band is doing now. In a pinch though, the tube amps I'm using do quite well. Since I don't have time onstage to dial in the tone, I have to leave it as is for electrics and go with it, but still does a good job, I haven't had any complaints. I can set the tone on the guitar instead, so it all works out in the end.

What brand guitar is basically personal preference. I like Takamine really well, our other guitar player has a newer Ovation that sounds great plugged in, probably better than my Takamine, but it's also 15 years newer. Always keep a spare battery handy, you get almost no warning when it goes weak and you'll start getting distorted sound. I had to change a battery in the middle of a song a few weeks ago. Good one song, started sounding nasty the next. Ibanez also makes some nice acoustics, I've tried out a few of their mid range (price) guitars and they would probably work for what I need. Watch the material, avoid laminated tops. Once you look at a few it's not that hard to tell. Just check out the sound hole of the cheapest ones, most are laminated. I also like the cedar tops, I found out long after I got it my Takamine is a cedar top, I love the sound it gets. Seems to have better bottom end than spruce.

In general, the electronics in newer guitars is better than the older ones, that's why the newer Ovation sounds better plugged in than my Takamine. They've been making a lot of advances in acoustic electronics the past 20 years or so. I didn't like the sound of the older ones, like the single knob Ovations of the 80's, nothing but a volume knob, the newer ones with EQ and tuners are sounding a lot better.

In general, you get what you pay for. Hold out for the best you can afford, check around and try a few before buying.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#9
As stated above, 30 watt acoustic solo amps are great for solo stuff but lack big stage power. I have the Crate 100 watt version, and it will cover the drums in rehearsal and can be used on stage for acoustic because we PA the vocals.
For the guitar, look for a used Godin (Seagull) A6. Sounds great and easy to play because it takes 10 gauge electric strings. Basically the size of a Tele, with a nice round neck for all night playability. Special pickup makes it sound acoustic.
#10
I own a Taylor, but I prefer not to take it anyway after a mishap with a child. Wasnt a big deal, but it could have been.

The very next day, I went and bought a ~$300 USD Ibanez Acoustic-Electric. I had to file down the fret ends and adjust the truss rod a hair, but it is amazing for the price. The sound is good and the feel is comparable to my Taylor after I adjusted it. That's the guitar I take everywhere now. The nice, thick poly coating on it has held up to some dings flawlessly. If only my satin Taylor had poly finish...

So if I were you, I would just do what I did. Go to a guitar shop and play damn near every acoustic guitar in your price range. Do not hesitate to pick the cheaper guitar if you like it. I was expecting to get a $400 Breedlove, but the Ibanez felt a little better to me.
#11
Quote by ciano16
. . . . So if I were you, I would just do what I did. Go to a guitar shop and play damn near every acoustic guitar in your price range. Do not hesitate to pick the cheaper guitar if you like it. . . . .


And this ^ ^ ^ ^ is the best possible advice.

When it comes to amplifiers, I use a large keyboard amp for both acoustic and electric guitars. Much the best option.
#12
Quote by Tony Done
The implication being that an acoustic amp would be better for a nylon string. I've never tried it, but it makes a lot of sense to me. Nylon strings are often fairly mellow, and could benefit from the more hi-fi like qualities of an acoustic amp.


Nylon strings - and I love them to bits - can be problematic when amplified. They produce more high frequency harmonics than steel strings and amplification can accentuate them producing some quite nasty sounds. I use a keyboard amp - just as good (better?) - than an acoustic amp and often cheaper. I quite often find myself turning down the treble and even sometimes mids EQs.
#13
I use a Manuel Rodriguez "crossover" nylon-string through an electric amp (Cube 40) and am currently using the "acoustic simulation" setting on the amp which so far gives me the best sound quality.

I don't know much about "percussive" technique; I admit it does not appeal to me....Too many years playing "regular" guitar, perhaps. However... A word of caution. Some of these percussive techniques can get rather energetic, and it's quite possible to damage the guitar. Soft cedar tops are prone to denting (which is why Flamenco guitars have the "golpeador" or tap-plate installed) and braces can come loose and cracks appear.

So you might want to buy a sturdily-built instrument. Also, be sure you're getting a piezo- style pickup. One that picks up the sound from the body of the guitar, rather than a magnetic pickup which picks up string vibration. A magnetic pickup will amplify taps and slaps poorly or not at all.
#15
Quote by Tony Done
Garthman

That's interesting , because I've discussed the possibility of using a keyboard amp rather than an acoustic amp in other fora. Quite similar, apparently, except you don't get the possibly-redundant mic input common to acoustic amps.
The controls and inputs on an amp designed for acoustic "only" guitars, actually have more in common with a portable PA system, than an electric guitar amp.

IMHO, electric amps work fine for acoustic guitar, as well or better than acoustic amps. With an acoustic amp, the high end is often accentuated via separate horn tweeter. With that said, that aggravated high end, is apt to be on which people like to blame the "quack" of piezo pickups, which perhaps is not the pickup's fault in it's entirety.
#16
Captaincranky

Yes, I agree that electric guitar amps can be better for steel-string acoustic guitars than acoustic amps, for the reasons you offer. - I used a Peavey Classic 30 and then a Fender Blues Deluxe for acoustic gigging. However, you did mention somewhere that you thought a acoustic amp might be better for a nylon string guitar, and this also makes sense to me. FWIW, one of the tech guys I know, a regular gigging guitarist, commented many years ago that he thought that cheap UST-piezo equipped nylon-string guitars often sound quite good when amplified compared to their mellow acoustic tone, because it added a bit of bright aggressive top end. Piezo pickups might well have improved since then, and I have also tried some good-sounding inexpensive nylon strings recently, not so common 20 years ago.
#17
Tommy Emmanuel is an expert, I am just Joe Blow, but I have gigged regularly on an acoustic for about 15 years. Guitar brands I like in your price range new or used:
Breedlove, Yamaha, Seagull, Takamine. There are others but I have spent quality time with all of these. Go play em and see if one speaks to you.

A good clean guitar amp works pretty well for acoustic electric. Fender, Roland, Vox all sound pretty great. Happy hunting!
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#18
Jesus, i forgot about this.

Well guys, i have made actually more than I was hoping for. But unfortunately some "issues" came along and the plan of buying is on idle atm.
Regardless thank all for your time and advices.