#1
I just got a TC Electronic Hall of Fame Reverb Pedal and it has Stereo inputs and outputs. I have always used the mono ins and outs with my guitar and I am just wondering what the stereo ones are for... THANKS!
#2
Some effects use a wet/dry signal where one output has the effect and the other doesn't or has less of it. Basically it's to run the signal to two amps to maximize the effect, or something like that. Reverb, chorus, delay, effects like that really take on a neat character when run in stereo.
Ibanez UV777 - Carvin TL60 & 727 - Jackson KE3
Splawn QuickRod - Mesa Stiletto & RoadKing - Peavey Ultra+ - Peavey Bandit
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7 String Legion
#3
Cheers! So it would be ok for me to try plugging my guitar in to the stereo connections? Would there be any difference just into one amp?
#4
If you're just running one amp use the mono input/output.

Also, if your amp has an FX loop, try running the pedal there. Time based effects (reverb, delay) usually sound best there IMO.
Ibanez UV777 - Carvin TL60 & 727 - Jackson KE3
Splawn QuickRod - Mesa Stiletto & RoadKing - Peavey Ultra+ - Peavey Bandit
Some pedlulz & cabz


7 String Legion
#5
It wasn't working anyway when I tried to plug into Stereo for some reason... The light wouldn't come on
#6
The stereo input isn't an actual stereo input, it's a right input that's enabled when you also plug into the mono (left input). So it'll only work if you're actually feeding it 2 signals.

I had a stereo set-up for a while and had my modulation and delay pedal in stereo. Amp A loop to both and back and Amp B loop to both and back. Sounded really nice.

I think a big factor for stereo ins and outs is also flexibility for more than just guitar. Keyboards will most of the time want stereo, for instance.
#7
Stereo guitar?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Gibson-ES-345-VINTAGE-1981-Stereo-OHSC-Varitone-ES345td-es335-/272367823124?hash=item3f6a632914:g:u7YAAOSwhOVXcnBr

I have an Arion Analog Delay with mono in and stereo out, I used it for stereo guitar a while back. I'd plug it into the effect loop of a Peavey MX amp, one side back into the effects loop, the other side to a separate amp on the other side of the stage. Set the other amp so I had stereo sound, then everything was controlled from the main amp. Bass player loved it, he could finally hear me...I put the second amp right beside him.

I haven't used an effect like you describe, with stereo input, but I would think it would work great for a stereo guitar with two amps.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Sep 8, 2016,
#8
Wet /dry is not true stereo. A stereo effects is when the unit sends a wet signal to both amplifiers, but the signal is different to each channel.

The use of the stereo input of the hall of fame is used to be able to apply reverb on 2 different channels. This is done after splitting to stereo using a different unit.

Alternatively, it can be used for a mono signal with two amps. This is done to achieve a better tone. Having a good clean amp for definition and a heavy amp for tone may be another approach. Stacking both amps and mixing them to get a mono overall better tone. If the amps would require different overdrive/compression pedals or settings, the hall of fame stereo inputs and outputs can be used to apply reverb to each differently. I would NOT suggest using any pedal in this way in the effects loop as this may cause some ground issues.

I do not have a hall of fame as I use reverb from the amp, but, sometimes I used a mono input into a TC Electronic Corona Chorus, then I use the stereo outputs and connect 2 different amps and use them similarly as I explained above. Using a Fender for great definition and low end, and a Marshall to push the mids with some breakup.

To summarise, rather than calling them stereo, I would call it 3 ways of using 2 amps:
The first one is using 2 different amps and mixing them to mono for a better tone.
The next is wet/dry. This is used to fake a true stereo. One of the best uses is to send a vibrato to a channel and the dry signal to the other achiving a chorus effect or similar.
The third way is using 2 amps in a true stereo system. This can be achieved only if having the correct pedal.

I hope this helps.
Last edited by Gab_Azz at Sep 8, 2016,