#1
Hey guys, had a question about this tuning (f# f# b e g# c#). What would it be categorized in and why would someone tune their guitar like this. Been learning some Architects songs and they use this tuning on their latest album. Looks like Drop F# tuning on a 7 string with the 6th string missing. What would the advantage of this be?
#2
C# standard tuning is C# F# B E G# c# (low to high).

Now compare:
C# F# B E G# c# (standard)
F# f# B E G# c# (Architects)

They just dropped the low C# to double the F# on the octave. Gives a bit more oomph to the low notes.
#3
it's because they're trying to be more interesting than they are
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#5
It's pretty similar to what was used in this song (standard tuning with the low E dropped to A).



Well, back when this song was recorded, there were no 7 string guitars (or maybe there were but they were definitely not mainstream). But today I'm not sure why one would use that tuning instead of just using a 7 string guitar. Well, if you are used to playing a 6 string guitar, I guess it makes sense.

If your song is in the key of F# and you play a lot of chugging stuff on the open 6th string, I can see why you would want to do that.
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#6
Yes, I thought of that song too. Eddie Van Halen used a bass string on his guitar for the low A.
Also it's gonna have a slightly different sound from a 7 string as you have two A's an octave apart, instead of AEA on a 7 string.