#1
I've been playing for maybe 1 1/2 - 2 years, and I just got a Chinese made guitar called Fernando last December. The problem for me, is that I've improved so much, as in I can learn several songs in a day easily, I can do improv, I know many techniques, and I've joined my teachers jazz band, even though I'm a rock player at heart . I've graduated his class as the only level five, the time it took was less than a month and a half. Now onto my question, I'm upgrading my gear, so I'm buying stuff and blah blah blah. The new stuff will be a Gibson 2016 les Paul studio T, new cables and a Roland 40 GX Cube. After all this mess, what do I do with my crappy guitar? It has very high action thanks to the tremolo and the nut, the machine heads aren't impressive, the electronics inside are horrible, and the frets are un even, yet I manage to make it sound decent with my Boston m6 mini amp. What do you think I should do with it? Burn it? Keep it as a reminder? I'm open to suggestions.
#2
I still have my Ibanez Roadstar II from 1985 and recently have been thinking about upgrading the pickups and fixing it up (purely for sentimental reasons). Still love the guitar. Guess it depends on how connected you are to the guitar in the limited time you've had it.
#3
I nearly have no sentiment for it, but it is my first electric guitar. I forgot to mention its neck was designed horribly and it feels uncomfortable.
#4


Seriously, though, don't spend more money on it. Hang it on a wall, tuck it back into its case and save it as a momento, pass it on to someone else as a gift, etc. Don't bother upgrading it; you'll get all done and realize that you've mostly put expensive lipstick on a pig and you'll do some of the above with it anyway.

I still have my first guitar, but my first guitar was a Gibson 335-12, has great pickups and action and still gets played.
#6
dspellman Good point, off topic what do you think of the Roland Cube 40 GX, is it a good pick?
#7
In my opinion you should keep it. You'll only get a few bucks to sell it, and some day, you'll wish you still had it !

I wish I had my first guitar! I'd give anything to play it. It was a squier stratocaster- I was a shred guy so I butchered the poor thing.. I scalloped the fretboard, ruined the pickguard as I tried to make my own humbucker... oh yeah. but I wish I could have it back and play it now
#8
trashbeast Except my first electric is crap compared to yours. Selling it or making it a gift doesn't seem like a bad idea.
#9
The action makes it a bit uncomfortable for me to play on the high frets. Makes me want to snap it in half! But thanks to my morality and parents, I couldn't.
#10
Quote by Bigjoe42
trashbeast Except my first electric is crap compared to yours. Selling it or making it a gift doesn't seem like a bad idea.

In that case I would suggest giving it to a family who is not able to afford an instrument for their child. It might be a piece of crap to you but some kid might love that thing like it's the best guitar in the world. That'd probably feel amazing
#11
trashbeast I've decided to give it as a gift if I have the chance, thanks all for the wonderful suggestions.
#12
Quote by Bigjoe42
dspellman Good point, off topic what do you think of the Roland Cube 40 GX, is it a good pick?


I have no experience with it.

I just realized that I've never had a "modeling amp." Nor have I ever had a "beginner" amp (or guitar).
My first *guitar* amp was a Vox Super Beatle, and my first modeler was a Pod XT.

If it were me with the budget you're working with, my current level of knowledge and the choices that are out there now, I'd probably lay things out differently.

This is going to see awfully bass-ackwards I suppose, but I'd put a PLEK job/setup and a fret superglue at the top of my budgetary list (about $200 or so).

So far I've done that on $4000 Gibson Axcess Customs and $200 Agile B-Stocks and both play like a dream and sound great. The fret superglue eliminates pop-up frets in climate changes, does away with "dead" frets and (if you're a cork sniffer) seems to affect the tone of the guitar (see StewMac.com for information) in a positive way. The PLEK job ensures level frets and, if you've got a very competent tech, allows you to get the action right down on the deck if you want it that way. Sorry, but Gibsons do NOT come with a PLEK job that's in any way similar to that done by a good tech in a good shop.

Second, I'd bump my amp budget and consider used if you've got a good market. A good used Pod XT Live (floor model) will run perhaps $125 and a full-range PA-type speaker (I'm using a Carvin PM12A as an example) will run you under $300 used in near-perfect shape. That's a powered cabinet with a 12" LF driver and a 1" tweeter and 400W RMS of power. I'd also buy an OnStage RS-4000 tilting amp stand. Since you're already considering a modeling amp, this takes things up a LONG way (right to professional levels), and it gives you floor switching, a lot of user preset banks, an expression pedal (wah/volume selectable), a good tuner and more.

Third, I'd probably not pick that guitar and certainly not new. I'm a Gibson fan from my first guitar and I have a stack of them. But aside from the aforementioned $4K Axcess, none of them are younger than about 1980. There's nothing *wrong* with most current Gibsons, but I think that there are non-Gibson guitars that are far better values in the price ranges under $2500-3500. When you get into the $3K and up range, the Gibson you get is more like the ones that made Gibson's reputation. Below that, Gibson competes, but mostly on the value of its logo. Not on the quality of its guitars. You can even get US-made guitars that are better. Check out Suhr, Tom Anderson, Taylor (yeah, they make electrics!). And, of course there's Carvin/Kiesel. There are a huge number of Asian-sourced guitars that are better values and that are under $1000. Any objective view of those guitars against a new Gibson (ignoring the logo) will suggest that they're a better value than Gibsons costing half again or double.

But regarding that specific guitar...I'm a big LP fan in terms of body size, shape, etc. A large number of mine have Floyds (heretical!).

What I don't like about a standard LP (including the Studio) is, first of all, the clunky neck heel. There's a body point behind the 16th fret that nails the palm of your hand whenever you move up the neck. That makes upper fret access uncomfortable. The distance between the inner edge of the cutaway point and the neck of the guitar actually forces me to rotate my hand in the upper fret region to fret some notes. Most LP's don't have a tummy cut. Because the body is thick, the inner edge nails your ribs. Spend a little time with that guitar and you have a dent there. You'll also have a dent in your forearm due to the hard edge on the front of the body if you play one standing up much. There are guitars that have shaved neck heels and tummy cuts, and that also have wider cutaways or stubbier horns, and all of that makes the guitar more comfortable and more comfortable to play in the upper regions.

A Les Paul will go out of tune frequently, particularly on the D and G strings, unless you have an absolutely perfectly cut nut and good lubrication. This is due to the tilted-back headstock and the angle at which the strings leave the nut to get to the tuners. This is ONE of the reasons I have a Floyd on a lot of my guitars; it doesn't care what happens to the strings behind the locking nut, and it never goes out of tune.

That tilted-back headstock has one other issue. It breaks. the Les Paul is the single most-broken neck on the planet. After that, it's the "tilted pointy" Jackson-esque headstock. The least? The straight-pull no-headstock-tiltback guitars. The Les Paul neck shows its roots in the old 30's archtops. The other issue that adds to the breakage is the use of a single-piece mahogany neck. The upper class of Gibson guitars has traditionally used multi-piece maple necks (usually with stringers), and the thicker archtop bodies meant that the tilted-back headstock never touched the back of the case or the floor when the guitar was laid on its back. Unfortunately, it was the middle-of-the-line LP Standard that got popular, and the single piece mahogany neck is delicate and a design flaw. More Gibson Les Paul headstock breaks happen IN THE CASE than anywhere else.

The nitrocellulose finish on LPs is crap. The only reason it exists is because Gibson Marketing has perpetuated a unicorn-fart fairy dust mythos about it in an effort to differentiate Gibsons from guitars that use modern finishes. It discolors, checks, chalks, chips, embrittles with age and transmits the surface texture below it to the surface of the paint itself (btw, nitrocellulose was developed as one of the first plastics, and these show up on guitars in tuner buttons, switch knobs, "pearloid" inlays and some faux tortoise-shell pickguards), which has hoodwinked generations of guitarists into thinking that a 25-layer nitro paint job is a "thin" finish. It outgasses component acids as it decays and it's extremely susceptible to chemical and material reactions that can leave "burn" marks and cloudy areas. Gibson found it was picking up colors from the fabrics on the interior of its cases and had to move to a white fabric for a while until it got that sorted. There's a reason why the automotive industry abandoned it 65 years ago.

The polyester and polyurethane finishes that some guitarists still scoff at as "coated in plastic" protect the guitar, mostly don't discolor or react with other materials, don't outgas caustic acids. They're self-leveling, so stay glossy with far fewer coats, and can actually be applied in a far thinner coat than nitrocellulose and won't transmit surface imperfections. So guitarists who are unaware of all these properties tend to believe it's thicker when it isn't. These finishes are cured, often in a few minutes with the application of UV light, but nitrocellulose doesn't actually cure, ever, and the solvents simply stop outgassing until the paint itself begins to degenerate. Those solvents, by the way, are highly dangerous to those that work around them, causing brain and nerve damage, internal organ problems, eyesight issues and much more. They're also highly toxic to the environment, and Tennessee is one of the few states with politicians willing to grandfather in Gibson's use of the material commercially.

Other than that...
#13
Quote by Bigjoe42
I nearly have no sentiment for it, but it is my first electric guitar. I forgot to mention its neck was designed horribly and it feels uncomfortable.


Just curious....what model is it?
#15
dspellman Hmm... Good opinion, respect it. I currently live in a region in Saudi Arabia, to describe it, kinda like a province that's slowly building itself up with all the shopping districts and whatnot. There are no music stores, unless we drive to Jeddah, which is 3-4 hours away. In the store, they sell mostly Fenders, Jacksons and Gretsch as the main guitar brands. For amps they sell Fender and Roland as far as I know. My budget limits me to the amp and guitar I have selected, and I'm still young, 14 years old. The Gibson will be shipped from Dubai, with a hard case, which will cost 4899 sar or $1300+, without taxes and shipping payment. I've read its profiles, videos, demos etc. It seems like a good deal, and to summarize it, vintage stuff, traditional tuners and neck width, no G force crap, no offense if your a fan, it also has a weight relieved body, they managed to keep the tone which is good. You almost made me change my mind about what guitar I want, the finish might be a problem as you mentioned, but it's something I can manage. Some of my other options are an American Fender strat or an Ibanez. Still I haven't changed my mind about the LP, I will buy it. But kudos to nearly changing my mind, not many can do that, give this guy a round of applause!

Oh and here's the website where I'm buying the guitar : http://sadek-music.com/NEW/Gibson-Electric-Guitar-Les-Paul-Studio-2016-T-Wine-Red-Chrome-Hardware?search=gibson%20les%20paul
Last edited by Bigjoe42 at Sep 12, 2016,
#17
Quote by Bigjoe42
dspellman Hmm... Good opinion, respect it. I currently live in a region in Saudi Arabia, to describe it, kinda like a province that's slowly building itself up with all the shopping districts and whatnot. l


Entirely off-topic:

Last time I was in Riyadh I was assisting with the photography of a just-delivered new airplane (the interior, mostly) for some of the royals on a runway at King Kahlid. The interiors of these airplanes sometimes cost more than the airframes themselves. I can't tell you much more than that, but I can tell you that a fellow named Nick Gleis was my studio mate (and a groomsman at my wedding) several years ago and I can give you an idea of what the interiors were looking like prior to 2010...
https://www.wired.com/2010/09/nick-gleis/
#18
Quote by Bigjoe42
dspellman I currently live in a region in Saudi Arabia, to describe it, kinda like a province that's slowly building itself up with all the shopping districts and whatnot. There are no music stores, unless we drive to Jeddah, which is 3-4 hours away. In the store, they sell mostly Fenders, Jacksons and Gretsch as the main guitar brands.


Your resources are going to be slightly different from mine (I'm in LA).
#19
Well I just bought the Roland Cube 80 GX. It's great, nuff' said. Just wish I could have more to select, oh well. On a side note, I was supposed to purchase the 40 GX, but it's a 16 minute drive to the store I saw it in + traffic.

Completely off topic: Have you ever been/heard of Yanbu ( where I currently live).
Last edited by Bigjoe42 at Sep 14, 2016,