#1


The whole world was impacted by this.

Every country was forced into a reactionary stance. A coalition was dispatched to foreign countries to end the groups that caused this.

The fallout of this event is still very much a part of what drives all foreign policy to this day.

Let's not forget what real hate can lead to.


Respect to our emergency services.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
Last edited by JustRooster at Sep 11, 2016,
#2
Had the opportunity to accompany a first responder NYPD officer through the memorial last year. It was his first time through it, and the stories he told me were incredible.
#3
I haven't been to the memorial yet, but that definitely needs to happen.

The effects of this really reverberated into a permanent change in global foreign policy and international cooperation against certain organizations.
My God, it's full of stars!
#4
I went to Ground Zero in 2006. It was quite harrowing.
dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


#5
Quote by Trowzaa
I went to Ground Zero in 2006. It was quite harrowing.


I did in 2008.

It was a noisy construction site.

o()o

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#6
Honestly I don't feel much during the official 9/11 anniversary. But if I'm watching an older movie and they'll casually show what the skyline used to look like, those are the small and unexpected moments that hit harder.
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#8


Well I think this is the appropriate thread to do this in. Last year I researched for hours and hours trying to find who this man was, why he was there, and what his last moments would have been like. This is what I was able to find.

He was a waiter for the Windows on the World restaurant on the 106th floor. I found this by matching this picture of the restaurant's staff in uniform (white tunic, black dress pants).

There was a conference taking up the 106th floor of the restaurant for Risk Waters Financial Technology Congress, and the rest of the restaurant was closed that day. What was open was a remote restaurant connected to Windows on the World called Wild Blue, which was only for building employees.
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He was most likely assigned to serve there with a few others.

The first plane hit at 8:46 AM, crashing underneath them. Elevators would not work, and stairway doorknobs would be burning hot. There would be no light in the restaurant, but emergency light would be activated. Before long very dark smoke would start rising from elevator doors, stairway doors, and vents. Many calls were made from the restaurant, and all of which were responded to by telling them to remain calm, not to move, and that help was coming. No help was coming.
He took refuge in the North side of the 107th floor in the closed restaurant, as it was not blocked by the smoke. He was most likely looking down and watching people run from the towers. He would've been able to hear and feel the impact of the second plane hitting the South Tower. Windows were broken, and he would have been able to faintly hear sirens over the wind and screams. Sirens that could not help him.

Many people were crowded in that same room. Many people started jumping before he did.

He jumped to his death at 9:41 AM. It would have taken approximately 11.23 seconds to complete the fall.
#10
For me, it's really easy to be desensitized to the event amidst all the blind nationalism and constant invocation of "never forget", but really thinking about it reminds me of what an impactful event it was, and it wasn't even that long ago, although it feels like it since I was young when it happened. Considering the events now is definitely horrifying in every way.

looking at that picture and the stuff ehbacon posted hits me right in the gut. Even though it could be seen as morbid, I'd rather see more of that stuff than the super imposed eagles and all that. The patriotic/nationalistic stuff has kind of lost its connection these days, to me at least. It's kind of just used as a set piece for solidifying our 'people fight us because we're so awesome mentality' mentality at times, especially in the face of criticism. But looking at and thinking of the people in the attacks, that's never stopped affecting me at all. I definitely do see those appeals too, and I'm glad for it. Like, honoring the victims and all those service members who responded, that's what has caused the best feeling of unity in my experience. It's a shame that some people let that stuff fall by the wayside in favor of ideological differences.
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brot pls
Last edited by BladeSlinger at Sep 11, 2016,
#11
It took me like a week to realize what a big deal it was. I was alone in a hotel on a vaction in Miami flipping through channels that morning. I came across CNN with a shot of one of the towers with smoke coming out. I formed two possible conclusions - 1) a plane accidentally crash into it 2) some lone weirdo was trying to pull a stunt like when you see some nut rush into the White House.
Then the 2nd plane comes and it's like ok this is something a little more serious. I watched for a few more minutes then I continued with my vacation.
In my head, it was a bad thing but it was about as bad as when the the guy bombed those buildings in Oklahoma or when WTC was bombed in the early 90s. In Miami I still was just going out to the beach and going to the clubs at night. I'd hear people talk about it but I was still like this will blow over in a couple of weeks.
Then when I drove back home a week or so after I really started to realize "holy shit, people arent letting this go, they're talking about war and muslims and WTF is going on??? Wait, what?? A plane hit the pentagon too??? There was even another plane?? WTF???"

Once I heard the phrase "war on terror" I knew things were changed forever.
Last edited by EyeNon15 at Sep 11, 2016,
#12
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I like this



Whoa.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
Last edited by JustRooster at Sep 11, 2016,
#13
that picture is pretty heavy
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#14
I used to hate talking about 9/11 because it always felt more political than anything, at least living in texas/utah during the years following it. people seemed less upset that actual people (not just number of americans killed statistics) died and more upset that they fucked with america and used it as an excuse to fuel their xenophobia/islamophobia/etc.

I still hate talking about it cause it's a horrible event, but now I can focus on the actual attack itself more. the falling man and impending death are very disturbing for me, as is the video footage. but just the idea is disturbing enough. people went from going about their day to jumping to their deaths in a matter of minutes. the scariest part is imagining what went on through their heads. imagine being on the planes.

terrorists might try to rationalise civillian attacks as an act of war but for me this is murder on a personal level before you even get into the politics.

depressing: a lot of people hate the 9/11 jumpers because they allegedly betrayed god. they showed the daughter of who might be the falling man that photo and she called the falling man a piece of shit.
#15
I went to the memorial recently and that was when I found out that my relative's name was on it. I didn't go to the museum because getting through the rest of the day was difficult enough, but I would like to visit the museum one day.

I didn't know this until relatively recently because I was too young for my parents to explain it to me at the time, but events shortly after 9/11 are part of the reason my family left the US.
cat
#16
9/11 signified pretty much the end of a chapter of my life that was a lot more free and less full of uncertainty. I think that event caused a trickling down to changes in our individual perceptions of the world around us. Maybe that's just me, but since that day, everything that I had always known that I valued didn't give me the same warmth that it once did and the things that deviated from it induced more fear than it once did.
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#17
It's crazy to think that flight 93 flew over my school and crashed only about 30 mins from here. I really need to go see the memorial one of these days, I haven't been there since around '03.
#18
I don't get the picture, is it the coffin of a kid who died on 9/11?
Quote by jakesmellspoo
ooh look at me i'm ERIKLENSHERR and i work at fancy pants desk jobs and wear ties and ply barely legal girls with weed and booze i'm such a classy motherfucker.
#20
- kid sees 9/11 happen on TV
- goes to war as an adult
- dies as a result of the conflicts that occurred after 9/11

IIRC the coffins of US soldiers who are KIA are always draped with the flag. Fill in the gaps for the message
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#21
Quote by Banjocal
IIRC the coffins of US soldiers who are KIA are always draped with the flag. Fill in the gaps for the message


Nah, every veteran gets a flag. It's draped over a coffin or given as a trifold to accompany an urn. When they bury the coffin they take the flag off, fold it, and give it to a family member.

I also didn't quite get the pic at first because the KIA isn't really implied in any way. Dude could have died from anything.
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So does you
#22
Quote by ehbacon

Well I think this is the appropriate thread to do this in. Last year I researched for hours and hours trying to find who this man was, why he was there, and what his last moments would have been like. This is what I was able to find.


lol you spent hours on it when you could've just watched the documentary on him made in 2006

#23
Quote by Rebel Scum
lol you spent hours on it when you could've just watched the documentary on him made in 2006


Never watched it because i had heard there were inaccuracies but didn't know which facts were inaccurate
#24
The impact of 9/11 is different over here, but I still remember at the time it was quite a harrowing event. I remember my brother and I stayed up really late watching the news to see what was going on.

hard to believe it's been 15 years. or to put it in context, there will be students starting high school who will learn about 9/11 as an historical event that happened before they were born.
Come back if you want to
And remember who you are
‘Cause there's nothing here for you my dear
And everything must pass
#25
Quote by i_lovemetallica
The impact of 9/11 is different over here, but I still remember at the time it was quite a harrowing event. I remember my brother and I stayed up really late watching the news to see what was going on.

hard to believe it's been 15 years. or to put it in context, there will be students starting high school who will learn about 9/11 as an historical event that happened before they were born.


Suppose it's a bit like the Berlin Wall for someone my age.
My old signature was too long. Have a daisy.

#26
A day that in part changed the course of my career and life in many ways. As always, respect to emergency services/first responders. A day to reflect, remember and appreciate friends, brothers and colleagues. And as always, appreciation to anyone that has worked on ISAF, OEF, OIF.
#27
It's almost surreal when ever September comes around. We get memorial footage and such coming through on the news here but being British and reasonably young when it happened it's a really difficult event to not sound completely unmoved by.
It didn't take long to realise
The safest place was not her arms, but her eyes
Where she can't see you
For her gaze, it blisters;
Grey skin to cinders