#1
I would like to know what you play on minor blues apart from the blues scale to make it sound more interesting.
#2
It's not all about scales, it's about how you play the notes. Listen to a lot of blues solos and analyze them. Figure out what scales they use (and also look at the chords - how do the notes relate to the chords). But also pay attention to other things than just note choice. Rhythm and phrasing are really important. No scale on its own makes anything sound interesting/boring.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
As MM says ... scales should just be thought of as a palette of pitches to use, and not thought of as something to just ascend or descend.

Targetting chord tones will make your playing a lot more tied in with the tune.

Here's one simple idea for adding some spice... Suppose your chords are G-, C- and D- (G minor blues). Suppose you''re playing in 6/8 (shuffle feel), and play 4 bars G-, 2 bars C-, 2 bars G-, 2 bars D-, 2 bars G-.

On the 4th bar of the first G-, you could use a lick from F m7b5, or Gm7b5, or from DbMaj7, Just resolve to a chord tone in D- (or its 9th)

And try adding the 9ths of each chordin your blues licks.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Sep 19, 2016,
#4
I have listed quite a bit of blues. I have decent phrasing and I can land on the chord tones as I know the arpeggios. I can play only few notes outside of the scale for tension. I was looking to add some tension notes to make my playing more interesting. For example, I use the Phrygian dominant chord on the V chord when it resolves to i.
#5
I use melodic phrases to tell a story depending on the actual chord progression. Sometimes this falls well outside the basic Blues scale. One of Robben Ford's goto phrases to get listeners attention is using the diminished scale when leading to the IV chord. This creates tension that he then resolves with something more familiar. It's a good tool to keep in your box.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
I'm no expert at this but I've got a few suggestions. This is the Blues after all, Vibrato and bends > scale choice. Many blues men can get away with a solo that uses the Minor Pentatonic exclusively if they can vibrato well. Also the basic triads (especially the ones based on the tonic and fifth) can override the entire chord progression (that's what I've heard). Rhythm is an interesting subject and shouldn't be neglected. Hell I've been trying to write a drum beat that combines Meshuggah-style polyrhythms with Reggae (but that's another story).

Listen to the greatest blues men and how they solo and phrase things. For the dark side of the Blues, listen to Muddy Waters, Howlin Wolf, and especially Robert Johnson (those three are also very Metal in a retro way). For a warmer and more lighthearted approach, listen to the great, late B.B. King (his vibrato is one of the best and his phrasing is impeccable).

Robert Johnson's "Crossroads Blues". Robert's been called the ""great grandfather to all things heavy metal" and "the Founding Father of British Blues" for a very good reason. If you ignore the terrible recording quality (even Burzum would call it lo-fi), it's amazing.


B.B. King's "The Thrill is Gone". This is one of the many reasons, he was so legendary.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#7
I wouldn't use the blues scale. That has a major third, which is definitely not what you want to play against a minor triad. For i and iv you can use the minor scale and pentatonic of either the key or the chord.
#8
Quote by cdgraves
I wouldn't use the blues scale. That has a major third, which is definitely not what you want to play against a minor triad. For i and iv you can use the minor scale and pentatonic of either the key or the chord.

BTW, what do you mean by the "blues scale"? When I say "blues scale", I mean a minor pentatonic scale with an added tritone.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
Quote by MaggaraMarine
BTW, what do you mean by the "blues scale"? When I say "blues scale", I mean a minor pentatonic scale with an added tritone.


I guess it's the "jazz blues scale", which is like 1 b3 3 4 b5 5 b7 7

But in any case, don't use a major third over a minor chord.
#10
Depending largely on the specific context of a given tune, you have the following basic options:

1) Minor pentatonic and blues scale ( these are the default)
2) Harmonic minor
3) Dorian mode
4) not sure what the name of this one is, but it's gold : 1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b7) - it's basically the minor scale without a 6th note, which blends the pentatonic sound and accentuates the 9th, which sounds awesome nearly all of the time.

In a minor blues accentuating the 9th of each chord usually works very well as mentioned above. I like using half step bends on the b5 and on the natural seventh as well, which can spice things up a bit.