#1
Hey, so I've been digging about quite a bit but I couldn't really find anything directly related to what my problem is.

For some time now, my over-all technique is pretty decent and I feel pretty good about where I'm at. Recently I've noticed though that any time I'm doing really fast string skipping (which sounds clean and right unplugged or acoustic), it seems like my pickups don't really pick up the low end of the skips. For example, when I'm going between the low C and anything else (especially the higher the intervals get), my pickups don't seem to have as much response. Usually, they just kind of pick one over the other, but usually I can really only hear the higher notes through the amp, while I'm mostly just hearing the low nuts just kind of fizzle through the amp. But, when I'm just chugging away, they come through fine. Also, when I play chords bigger than 3 not chords, it just seems to lose tone and I don't really get any clear notes.

I'm playing an Ibanez with EMG's (installed after market by a really experienced family friend), and my set up is through a line 6 spider 4 15 watt. I've also started playing through my computer and ditching the line 6. My string gauge is 10-49. And I'm mostly playing drop B or Drop C. Everything sounds crisp unplugged or acoustic, but when I plug in... idk. I feel like I can only get like 1 or 2 notes through cleanly at a time. Thanks for any help.
#2
low end practice amp is incapable of sounding bass notes that low. your computer speakers aren't likely to be able to do any better. this results in mush so it sounds like crap. the EMGs may be overloading the preamp as well as they are pretty hot.
#4
I think he's saying that different pickups and/or *possibly* a different amp might be your solution.
#5
a better amp for starters. I assume you are playing with distortion as well. chances are you have the gain up to high which again turns the sound to mush. you may think it's "heavier" but that isn't really the case.
#7
monwobobbo I actually keep the gain a little bit back before half way. Usually bass is around 12 o clock or less, I tend to crank mids at at least 3/4, and treble behind at about 2 o clock.

dspellman: I'll give it a shot.
#8
Quote by tsever02
monwobobbo I actually keep the gain a little bit back before half way. Usually bass is around 12 o clock or less, I tend to crank mids at at least 3/4, and treble behind at about 2 o clock.

dspellman: I'll give it a shot.


ok but on what amp model? keep knocking back the gain until the sound cleans up some. the speaker on that amp is total crap so don't expect miracles. this is a common problem with little practice amps. you may want to back off the mids a bit as well. dspellmans idea may help as well.
#9
I had a Line 6 Spyder III 2 x12 I got it cheap when I first started playing guitar again after having sold most of my equipment to pay bills a few years prior, I could get a new amp fast enough, I made do with it while I saved up for a tube amp then line 6 did not sound authentic to me.

An amp upgrade will do wonders for your tone.
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