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#1
It's so hard to present yourself as a suitable employee when you know for a fact that you're a shitty person with no useful skills. I worry that if I ever make it to the interview stage, I won't be able to give an adequate answer as to why I've been unemployed for so long.

Writing a cover letter takes me a whole day because I can't think of anything good to say. I end up staying up until 4 am, then writing some shit just so I can wrap it up and go to bed. Rinse and repeat the next day. 90% of employers don't even bother replying, and if they do, it's usually 2 months later saying the position has already been filled. I am in a constant state of shame at my incompetence performing basic tasks.

How do normal people do this?
What's it like being a functional member of society?
#2
Many successful and wealthy people are also shitty people with no useful skills, don't let your dreams be dreams.
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#3
Your poor self-esteem probably reflects on your job application and deters from people to want to call you for an interview.
Free Ali
#5
Reading shit like this irritates the fuck out of me. Quit being such a fucking downer, drop the "poor me" attitude and someone may actually want to hire you.
#6
the worst period of your life for getting a job is when you're still in highschool / college
you have to fill out like 20+ applications just to get a call back from 1. Its miserable, because like you said, they always send you an email like months later...

you seem like an old dude (no really, join date 2005 means you're old, sorry)
you should feel pretty confident by now in yourself, otherwise you're doing something wrong
and if you feel worthless, it means you just don't have enough skills, go learn something, get references for that skill, put it on your resume.

easier said than done, but that's like everything valuable earned in life ...
Hard, honest work always pays off in the end.
Sure, some people get lucky, but those people don't have the skills needed to be successful in the long run, you don't want to be that kind of person.
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Last edited by k.lainad at Sep 25, 2016,
#7
Write a template cover letter and make changes to it for each job you apply to, as opposed to rewriting a new one every time.
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.
#8
Quote by behind_you
Write a template cover letter and make changes to it for each job you apply to, as opposed to rewriting a new one every time.


yea, use a pretty generic one so you can send out a dozen applications a day without worrying too much whether you'll hear back from them. write personalized ones for jobs that you're particularly interested in.
#9
i think you have to know how to sell yourself, how to focus on teh good parts and take attention away from the bad parts

instead of "i was unemployed for so long because i am laze" you say something like "i was feeling down on myself for a while and had no goals. but recently i have decided to change that lifestyle." maybe instead of "no outstanding skills" you are something more like "dedicated worker, listener, and follower."

idk maybe honesty is not the best way to get a job but i would have to be in a job where i lied in the interview about how great i am and perform incompetently later on. i think a lot of employers now adays see through a lot of the personal prepping people do, but someone honest is honest.
Last edited by Will Lane at Sep 25, 2016,
#10
Quote by k.lainad
the worst period of your life for getting a job is when you're still in highschool / college
you have to fill out like 20+ applications just to get a call back from 1. Its miserable, because like you said, they always send you an email like months later...

you seem like an old dude (no really, join date 2005 means you're old, sorry)
you should feel pretty confident by now in yourself, otherwise you're doing something wrong

and if you feel worthless, it means you just don't have enough skills, go learn something, get references for that skill, put it on your resume.

easier said than done, but that's like everything valuable earned in life ...
Hard, honest work always pays off in the end.
Sure, some people get lucky, but those people don't have the skills needed to be successful in the long run, you don't want to be that kind of person.
heh
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#11
have you been to a job centre? have you explored hiring grants you may possibly be eligible for due to being out of employment so long?
#12
Quote by sashki
It's so hard to present yourself as a suitable employee when you know for a fact that you're a shitty person with no useful skills. I worry that if I ever make it to the interview stage, I won't be able to give an adequate answer as to why I've been unemployed for so long.

Writing a cover letter takes me a whole day because I can't think of anything good to say. I end up staying up until 4 am, then writing some shit just so I can wrap it up and go to bed. Rinse and repeat the next day. 90% of employers don't even bother replying, and if they do, it's usually 2 months later saying the position has already been filled. I am in a constant state of shame at my incompetence performing basic tasks.

How do normal people do this?
What's it like being a functional member of society?


Most I hear dont even look at cover letters, but I suppose it cant hurt to have one generic one that you can tweak for each new position, and show why you're interested in them after some research beyond getting a job.

You're probably not as shitty as you think as compared to the others, so telling that is just going to fuck your psyche up to a self-anti-fulfilling prophesy anyway.

Practice at least 5 basic, solid questions with this (what qualities do you look for in employees is a great one, what's one thing you think the firm could be doing better if any, etc) Research them etc: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Method_of_loci , and stay sharp at the interview to ask things that pop up. Talk slowly so you dont trip on what you're trying to say. Speaking slowly also signifies power and competency (the rest will follow, so just embody it).


Figure out something alright to say for why you've been out, but dont stretch it too much. Say "personal reasons" if you cant think of anything, or what have you.


It's a numbers game. Apply to more. indeed.com, ziprecruiter, careerbuilder, etc etc.


Career fairs? Seek foot in the door techniques. Send them a tenacious, determined email after applying. Look them up and say "hey I noticed you were a blank at blank, I happen to love that shit"


I get it, you feel like a total POS throughout the whole phase, but it'll eventually happen. Took me a gawwwddamn while, but finally starting out in a good position in a week or so


DONT LOSE HOPE. IT'S ALWAYS DARKEST BEFORE DAWN MAN
.
Last edited by Fat Lard at Sep 25, 2016,
#14
I'm in a job that I hate right now and am trying to find something new, and unfortunately the only way forward is to just keep applying for stuff. After I finished University I was job hunting for about half a year, and I was sending out hundreds of CVs, only to hear back from about ten percent of them. It is demoralising, and it can sometimes feel like you are wasting your time, but you just have to keep going.

Like I said, right now I'm in a job that I'm fed up with for various reasons, and I'm at a crossroads between applying for content writing jobs (generally good pay, something I'd enjoy, but difficult to get into without experience), and teaching assistant roles (a start to a rewarding career, good money, and a job where no two days are the same, but it is known for being very stressful), and so far I'm not having a whole lot of luck. But like i said, gotta put yourself out there to get something.

It may be an idea to have someone look at your CV if you don't think it's very impressive- it could be a friend, or you could contact a careers advice agency.
WHOMP

Think of that next time you are not allowed to laugh.
#15
Quote by sashki
It's so hard to present yourself as a suitable employee when you know for a fact that you're a shitty person with no useful skills. I worry that if I ever make it to the interview stage, I won't be able to give an adequate answer as to why I've been unemployed for so long.

Writing a cover letter takes me a whole day because I can't think of anything good to say. I end up staying up until 4 am, then writing some shit just so I can wrap it up and go to bed. Rinse and repeat the next day. 90% of employers don't even bother replying, and if they do, it's usually 2 months later saying the position has already been filled. I am in a constant state of shame at my incompetence performing basic tasks.

How do normal people do this?
What's it like being a functional member of society?



What kind of jobs are you applying to that require a cover letter but accept applications with no pertinent skills?
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#16
Your first mistake is "applying" for a job. That application will never see the light of day.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#18
When you do finally get an interview, enter the room with no expectation that you're going to get that job. Don't blow the interview out of proportion by thinking to yourself that your entire livelihood depends on securing this job, as it creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. It makes you anxious which comes across in your interview. That one job you've got an interview for is not your only option. Always remember that lifting the burden of expectation will make you more relaxed and confident.

Demonstrate something that makes you different from other candidates. When I secured my job at Bentley, I did it by demonstrating that I've been helping my dad with doing his word clock project. And I did it by actually showing my employer a working prototype, which was something that caught my employer by surprise. It seemed a bit odd at the time, but it differentiated my interview from everyone else's and it made said employer remember my name and credentials. Almost anyone who wins at something competitive is going to be doing something differently from everyone else, even if that something else is from an unexpected source.
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And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#19
Quote by behind_you
Write a template cover letter and make changes to it for each job you apply to, as opposed to rewriting a new one every time.

That's usually the plan, I'm tailoring this one to a specific company because I know a guy who works there and I want to make a good impression.

Quote by Godsmack_IV
have you been to a job centre? have you explored hiring grants you may possibly be eligible for due to being out of employment so long?

I have monthly meetings with a job advisor but don't have many suitable job offers. I studied electronic engineering, but they only have offers for electricians or IT. I could conceivably learn to do those, but it's hard to convince people to give me a chance with my current qualifications (hence the lack of replies).

Quote by JustRooster
What kind of jobs are you applying to that require a cover letter but accept applications with no pertinent skills?

I have a degree in electronic engineering but no industry experience. The only "skills" I can bring up is either stuff I've done for coursework, or personal projects, which are all really basic compared to what professionals do. When I don't have the exact things they're looking for, I try to mention tangentially related skills and emphasize my willingness to learn.

Quote by TheChaz
Reading shit like this irritates the fuck out of me. Quit being such a fucking downer, drop the "poor me" attitude and someone may actually want to hire you.

Sorry, but this doesn't help me, or anyone, for that matter.
You've basically said "stop being distressed, it makes me uncomfortable".

Quote by Fat Lard
Most I hear dont even look at cover letters, but I suppose it cant hurt to have one generic one that you can tweak for each new position, and show why you're interested in them after some research beyond getting a job.

You're probably not as shitty as you think as compared to the others, so telling that is just going to fuck your psyche up to a self-anti-fulfilling prophesy anyway.

Practice at least 5 basic, solid questions with this (what qualities do you look for in employees is a great one, what's one thing you think the firm could be doing better if any, etc) Research them etc: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Method_of_loci , and stay sharp at the interview to ask things that pop up. Talk slowly so you dont trip on what you're trying to say. Speaking slowly also signifies power and competency (the rest will follow, so just embody it).


Figure out something alright to say for why you've been out, but dont stretch it too much. Say "personal reasons" if you cant think of anything, or what have you.


It's a numbers game. Apply to more. indeed.com, ziprecruiter, careerbuilder, etc etc.


Career fairs? Seek foot in the door techniques. Send them a tenacious, determined email after applying. Look them up and say "hey I noticed you were a blank at blank, I happen to love that shit"


I get it, you feel like a total POS throughout the whole phase, but it'll eventually happen. Took me a gawwwddamn while, but finally starting out in a good position in a week or so


DONT LOSE HOPE. IT'S ALWAYS DARKEST BEFORE DAWN MAN

Quote by donender
I'm in a job that I hate right now and am trying to find something new, and unfortunately the only way forward is to just keep applying for stuff. After I finished University I was job hunting for about half a year, and I was sending out hundreds of CVs, only to hear back from about ten percent of them. It is demoralising, and it can sometimes feel like you are wasting your time, but you just have to keep going.

Like I said, right now I'm in a job that I'm fed up with for various reasons, and I'm at a crossroads between applying for content writing jobs (generally good pay, something I'd enjoy, but difficult to get into without experience), and teaching assistant roles (a start to a rewarding career, good money, and a job where no two days are the same, but it is known for being very stressful), and so far I'm not having a whole lot of luck. But like i said, gotta put yourself out there to get something.

It may be an idea to have someone look at your CV if you don't think it's very impressive- it could be a friend, or you could contact a careers advice agency.

I really appreciate these replies. Some very good advice here.
I did a brief course on CV and application writing a while ago. The teacher and my employment advisor seem to agree that my CV is pretty decent. My concerns are more with my lack of experience. Anyone can say that they can do a job, but not everyone can back that claim up with proven experience.
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
When you do finally get an interview, enter the room with no expectation that you're going to get that job. Don't blow the interview out of proportion by thinking to yourself that your entire livelihood depends on securing this job, as it creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. It makes you anxious which comes across in your interview. That one job you've got an interview for is not your only option. Always remember that lifting the burden of expectation will make you more relaxed and confident.

Demonstrate something that makes you different from other candidates. When I secured my job at Bentley, I did it by demonstrating that I've been helping my dad with doing his word clock project. And I did it by actually showing my employer a working prototype, which was something that caught my employer by surprise. It seemed a bit odd at the time, but it differentiated my interview from everyone else's and it made said employer remember my name and credentials. Almost anyone who wins at something competitive is going to be doing something differently from everyone else, even if that something else is from an unexpected source.


This is interesting. I do briefly mention some of my personal projects in my CV, although I've yet to find out what employers think of them.
Last edited by sashki at Sep 25, 2016,
#20
A friend pulls me in through the back and tells his boss he's gonna train me because what's their face quit, he gives me a clock in number and tells me to fill out an application after my shift.

That's been 50% of jobs I've had.

As for actually getting one without friends, I've heard of people hiring fake employers from linkedn accounts that will lie on your behalf and say you were a great employee who worked for them for years, or lie and learn a few things about start up companies and say you tried your best and failed that when you got out of college.

Welfare.

It's either one of those or get lucky if you've been out of work for a while.
#21
I don't like filling out paperwork too. But you gotta do it if you want the job, I suppose.
-BUBBA-
#23
Quote by sashki
Sorry, but this doesn't help me, or anyone, for that matter.
You've basically said "stop being distressed, it makes me uncomfortable".

Yeah it's harsh but it is kind of true. I don't know you, but you tend to put out an impression on the forums that you think you're a piece of shit. Which is clearly not true. Not if you don't think it is. You can try all kinds of things to get yourself the job, but it won't work if YOU don't think you deserve it.

If you're worried about difficult questions in the interview write them all out and then write down what your best response would be. Come into the interview having already thought about the toughest questions, not the easiest ones.

And yeah it can be pretty demoralizing when you have a gap on your resume that you can't account for, but you've got to not let it bother you. Otherwise when are you gonna fill that gap? it can only get longer, the time to end it is now.

I also hate the interview process. I hate having to contact referees. I hate writing cover letters and having to talk myself up. I'm an awkward person and I dread having to sit in an office and try and convince someone that I'm a worthwhile candidate to hire. I did it though, and have an internship at the end of November which I can't wait to start. (I'm a 3rd year EEE student)

Also the number of job rejections anyone has will vastly outnumber their acceptances. Just gotta roll with the punches.
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#24
What you need is an opportunity. Do you know anyone in the trade that'd be willing to take you on for a week? Are there any apprentice schemes you're eligible for? When you have nothing massively impressive on your resume and you're down on confidence it's unfortunately who you know rather than what you know. If you're focused on getting into that industry at least. Once you find someone who can get your foot in the door, you start to gain valuable experience, confidence, and eventually your CV will start to look better. That's what I had to do.

If you don't know anyone like that, maybe think about something more entry-level in the short term. Work hard at it, and learn how to twist the skills and experience you pick up into being relevant to the industry you want to get into. You're looking for your first step effectively, where it is isn't as important as where you go with it.

EDIT: As for the interview itself, you have to be assertive. Take control of it. I'm normally terrible at interviews but at my most recent one I was on form. I'd researched the company so when the interviewer was going through what they do I would interject with 'oh and you also offer x service right? That sounds really interesting' or when discussing duties and the challenges that would come with it I would again interject with 'oh yeah I had a similar experience a while back, this is how I handled it'. It meant that when she got to the competency-based questions I'd already pretty much answered anything she wanted so I just basically referred back to my previous answers and expanded on them. Preparation is definitely key.
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Last edited by RAB11 at Sep 26, 2016,
#25
Quote by Xiaoxi
Your first mistake is "applying" for a job. That application will never see the light of day.


Indubitably. I've been on the hunt for a job for quite a while (xiaoxi may remember discussing it with me back towards the beginning of the year) and was basically just filling out the online applications and uploading my resume. A couple weeks ago I said screw it, looked up a bunch of places in town that were hiring, didn't bother submitting an application online, printed out a bunch of resumes, and road around town all day handing out resumes and trying to get someone to talk to me. I ran out halfway through the day, still felt like going, and stopped by a library to look up more places and print more resumes. I mostly just ended up handing the resume to secretary types and talking to them for a second and they said they'd pass along the resume. I was pretty demoralized on the way home that nobody really talked to me until right as I got home one of them called me and set up an interview.

Then I heard about a local tech company having a job fair, went up there and handed them my resume, didn't even really get to talk to the person at the booth but for like 45 seconds, they took my resume and told me to submit an application online (I'd already applied to this company a couple of weeks before) and that was it, but sure enough I got a call back to come in for a real interview.

Since going for the more face to face, actually showing up and letting someone (even someone not in charge of hiring) see me and hear me talk and know that I went to the trouble of going to their place of business and hand them my resume in person I've had like 4 interviews in the space of a couple of weeks, even going back for a second interview with one business in particular. Compared to just submitting applications for months, which hasn't gotten me any interviews.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Sep 26, 2016,
#26
It took me nearly 4 years to find a job (well a job in what I studied) after I finished uni. Hundreds of applications and rejections, loads of shite interviews, loads of good interviews where I was unlucky and they just chose someone else, or where I wasn't experienced enough.

It's all part of the process. I don't know anyone who wasn't turned down from a load of jobs before actually finding one. You'll get there if you're persistent and learn from what you did wrong last time around
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#27
It's part of the process, and applying for jobs is setting yourself apart from the competition.

As others have mentioned, personal contact, things like that will pay dividends in the long run.

I work in Government, and if I want a job, I will ring the hiring manager before applying to talk to them about it. Even if I already know the facets of the job.

Cover letters are piss easy. They shouldn't be any longer than a page and just set out your good personal attributes. Once you have the right formula, you can pretty much use the same cover letter again and again.

EDIT: Interview skills. I'll tell you some things I have learned that make my interviews stand apart from others.
1) Always assume that the panel knows nothing. They know nothing about you, about your current job, about why you want a job.

2) Walk in to the interview like you own it. If you've been given an interview, it's because the employer thinks you may have a legitimate claim to the job. Act like it.

3) Ask the panel questions. If you're talking about some cool thing you've done in a previous job, ask them "Would you like me to explain a bit more?". It's a perfect way to engage the panel, which is something about 95% of candidates fail to do.
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Last edited by i_lovemetallica at Sep 26, 2016,
#28
Quote by i_lovemetallica
It's part of the process, and applying for jobs is setting yourself apart from the competition.

As others have mentioned, personal contact, things like that will pay dividends in the long run.

I work in Government, and if I want a job, I will ring the hiring manager before applying to talk to them about it. Even if I already know the facets of the job.

Cover letters are piss easy. They shouldn't be any longer than a page and just set out your good personal attributes. Once you have the right formula, you can pretty much use the same cover letter again and again.
And - this bit's important - how they link in to an advertised position, or something to do with the company if you're just handing it in to see what happens.

If you can give the impression that you're actively interested in working for the company - not just getting a job - that helps to get interviews. Especially with big companies, because they can often afford to take you on and do more training if they think you have the aptitude/attitude but not all the skills they want.
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#29
I've been struggling to find meaningful employment for a while as well

One thing that annoys me is when you have to put stuff like education/work history on an application, as well as attaching your CV. My work history/education is all on the CV ffs don't make me waste even more time.

I think my biggest problem is that I never know what sort of questions to ask the employer at the end
I have nothing important to say
#30
Quote by JackSaints
I think my biggest problem is that I never know what sort of questions to ask the employer at the end

You might need to research the roles you're applying for more thoroughly. Make up a question, even if you already know the answer. The employer doesn't know that, just ask them anyway. ask them about career development opportunities, etc etc etc
Come back if you want to
And remember who you are
‘Cause there's nothing here for you my dear
And everything must pass
#31
Quote by i_lovemetallica
You might need to research the roles you're applying for more thoroughly. Make up a question, even if you already know the answer. The employer doesn't know that, just ask them anyway. ask them about career development opportunities, etc etc etc


Make sure the questions are about what the job entails rather than what you get out of it as well. So like questions about pay/benefits/other little perks aren't great but like Tallie says, career progression, different services they offer, maybe if they offer any training like first aid or stuff like that. Shows you want to improve and have interest in the company.
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#32
Quote by JackSaints
I've been struggling to find meaningful employment for a while as well

One thing that annoys me is when you have to put stuff like education/work history on an application, as well as attaching your CV. My work history/education is all on the CV ffs don't make me waste even more time.

I think my biggest problem is that I never know what sort of questions to ask the employer at the end
Quote by Diemon Dave
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#33
Quote by sashki
I have a degree in electronic engineering but no industry experience. The only "skills" I can bring up is either stuff I've done for coursework, or personal projects, which are all really basic compared to what professionals do. When I don't have the exact things they're looking for, I try to mention tangentially related skills and emphasize my willingness to learn.



I see. It's a tough break-through as that industry has become so specialized. Have you thought about going to tech school or getting a certificate in something specific that would make you more immediately hireable?
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#34
I normally David Lee Roth my way through interviews and its worked out just fine. You know what really helps though? I have a recruiter on standby pretty much at all times. If I need something, he'll submit the resumes, get the job interested in ME and then all I have to do is nail the interview and that's it.
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#35
Quote by RBM01991
I normally David Lee Roth my way through interviews and its worked out just fine. You know what really helps though? I have a recruiter on standby pretty much at all times. If I need something, he'll submit the resumes, get the job interested in ME and then all I have to do is nail the interview and that's it.


That's a nice position to be in that most people just looking to 'start out' won't be lucky enough to have.
My old signature was too long. Have a daisy.

#36
Besides the self-pity party attitude, applications sucks and no one really likes them. It's like anything else, practice and you get better. Just do a bunch, even if they're crummy, and don't let yourself spend too much time on them. Go for volume.

The second thing is that applications aren't that great at getting you in the door, so call back, or better yet apply in person, and ask to talk to whomever is doing the hiring and express to them how you are a good fit for this job and willing to learn and to work hard/smart.

Basically you need to express a proactive attitude and desire to work. Everyone wants a paycheck, you don't stand out by just waiting for a callback.


"Every day I wonder how many things I am dead wrong about."
#37
Quote by RAB11
That's a nice position to be in that most people just looking to 'start out' won't be lucky enough to have.


In my experience, you can always go to a Temp agency to get some industry experience. The jobs may suck at first and may not pay all that well, but it will help OP get his foot in the door. Its what I did and its worked out well for me.
Gear:
1987 Charvel Model II
2010 Carvin ST300C
1990 Charvette 100
1991 Ibanez RG560M
2006 Fender Mexi Strat
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Pro Tools 9

Tutorial: Studio Quality Programmed Drum Sounds
#38
Quote by The4thHorsemen
Since going for the more face to face, actually showing up and letting someone (even someone not in charge of hiring) see me and hear me talk and know that I went to the trouble of going to their place of business and hand them my resume in person I've had like 4 interviews in the space of a couple of weeks, even going back for a second interview with one business in particular. Compared to just submitting applications for months, which hasn't gotten me any interviews.
Glad to hear you found success!

I recently had a direct role in the hiring process to expand my department team. It only further validated and made more tangible what I already knew:

- We don't even look at straight-from-online applications...everything sent is either through a recruiting firm that has an account exec relationship with my manager, or through direct vouch from us. So at the end of the day, we're looking at a handful of resumes. Anyone who submitted directly online....you just wasted your time and effort.
- There were no cover letters. I don't care to read them, but guess a short one wouldn't hurt. Didn't really care about education/certifications either. Looked more at the experience and accomplishments.
- We emphasized personality almost as much as technical skills. That can even make up for weak points in the tech skills. This is all gauged in the interview.
- By the time the job posting is officially public (required by law), we already have several candidates lined up...and again it's all through the vouching process mentioned above.

So again, I stress the importance of seeking out the right people and building relationships with them. Regularly keep in touch with past and present recruiters, as well as anyone else who can potentially be a connection in the future. Keep in mind that recruiters have a financial incentive to find new candidates and get them hired...that's how they make revenue. I haven't cold-applied to anything since 1st year of college and have never needed to write a cover letter or jump through bs hoops.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#39
Dont get too swayed by the 'no-online' thing though. It's a good idea to work through some recruiters (which is basically like applying online anyway from your end), but some firms will call you directly after e-applying. Usually the smaller-to-mid sized firms, and it's best to apply the day they post the job if it's possible. Basically getting email alerts for a few key searches, and ziprecruiter's app is pretty quick/real-time with new postings


EDIT: ziprecruiter is especially cool in that it lets you know when your resume has been viewed, and how many times (multiple times = good), and for some of the jobs, how many applicants there are so you can guage the competitiveness of that posting.
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Last edited by Fat Lard at Sep 26, 2016,
#40
Quote by i_lovemetallica
You might need to research the roles you're applying for more thoroughly. Make up a question, even if you already know the answer. The employer doesn't know that, just ask them anyway. ask them about career development opportunities, etc etc etc


Yeah I literally asked the same questions in every interview I've had. Progression, training process, start dates if they weren't already specified. If it was a company I was particularly interested in I'd ask some stuff about the company/industry itself
The plan was to drink until the pain over.
But what's worse, the pain or the hangover?
Who am I? I'm a titan so be expectin' a clash.
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