#1
hi there . (my english is not good )
.
i have learned and played electric guitar for 5 months with learn and master guitar tutorial series . in the future i want to continue learning with troy stetina heavy metal rhythm and lead guitar but i like to create music . i dont know how i can start learning . after learning music theory , Solfege , harmony .what must i learn ?
thanks
#2
Hello,

Composition is basically putting sounds onto paper in a way that is effective - you end up with a group of sounds you wanted to make.

To start, I would highly suggest ear training. Listening to music is a great way to get ideas. However, you need to be able to put these ideas on paper (or at least be able to record). Also, if you're writing alone for more instruments, don't focus just on listening to guitar. Listen to how the bass interacts with the guitar, the rhythm in the drums + bass, and how other instruments play with the others. (I don't know what kind of music you want to write, though.)

Either way, transcribing - writing out what's on recordings - is a very useful skill. You can see new music ideas clearly on paper/score. You can ask "how/why did they do this", which theory can help with.

Ear training and music theory (which includes solfège/harmony) are related to each other; it's best to work on both at the same time.

If you ever have questions about what's happening in X song, feel free to ask again!

(btw, I edited your post a bit for clarity )
#3
thanks
But i am not familiar with the rules of composition i want a book that explain how music made ... I do not know how to say
#4
Quote by broken-spades
thanks
But i am not familiar with the rules of composition i want a book that explain how music made ... I do not know how to say


The thing is, there are no "rules". To start composing, you first need to come up with a musical idea. Hear something in your head or just noodle around with your guitar until you come up with something that sounds cool. Listening to other people's music will help you with coming up with ideas. The best thing is to just analyze what's happening in music that you like.

There really is not a "how to" guide to composition. That's just not how music works.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#5
Quote by broken-spades
thanks
But i am not familiar with the rules of composition i want a book that explain how music made
No you don't.
You just need to learn how to play some songs you like (other people's songs), and steal sounds you like.
In particular, study how the songs are structured: intro, verse, chorus, etc. Look at which chords are put together and how. Study how riffs and vocals fit the chords.
And experiment yourself, of course. As a beginner, you'll probably have trouble coming up with ideas, but you can take an existing riff or chord sequence (from another song) and edit it in some way: change one or two notes; change the speed or rhythm or order of the chords. Record yourself and listen back to see what you like and what you don't.
#6
In DAWS there's a thing called ghost notes, learn to drag scales into a sample channel (instrument channel that has no vst/instrument in it) copy paste one you pic in every bar and for as many octaves as you plan on using.

Move things along the ghost notes (scale) until it sounds good.

Basically after learning percussion and the role of every instrument in the mix you can cheat the rest.

This is mostly me joking, but learning the role and how to effectively compose for certain instruments is important.
Also people who know nothing about writing music do use the technique I just described to write "cookie cutter" music, which is what people call it when a songs made from unoriginal sounds, parts, and generic techniques to be made quickly with little thought.


I've composed hundreds of songs, some with 40+mixer tracks and 20+ instruments, and besides scales I just learned I like going 3 steps above or to the next note (if it's in scale/key) to make a certain sound, 5 steps for another 7 for another harmony, etc. You can learn to build chords like that, and then use the chords to build melodies, arpreggios, etc because you'll know what notes are in the chord being played, and what notes would harmonize with those notes.

1)Learn the notes
2)Learn the scales (they're patterns really)
3)Learn where notes harmonize, I like 3rd 5ths 7ths 9ths and full octave below or above usually sound nice) (and for clearity, 3rd is like moving 3 frets (skipping over 2, like 1st frets note to 4th would be a 3rd if they harmonized) on your guitar.) You can use that to build chords from root notes.
4)Learn to utilize these with different instruments.
5)practice, watch other people writing on computer programs, learn various techniques.
Then you would know enough to write a symphony

But maybe I have no idea what I'm talking about and just compose using misinformation.
Last edited by stratkat at Sep 27, 2016,
#7
Thank you all friends
One thing I forgot to tell . i don't want compose pop song in pop song most of the Chords is used ! i like to compose metal solo like Garry more and etc ;
#8
It's still tonal music - based on chords.

Also, blues is a subset of pop music.
#9
You don't need to put anything on paper to compose (though it helps to capture your work somehow (MIDI, recorded ...).

You have to choose what sort of sound flavour you want to convey (Neo-classical metal, blues, hard-rock) and from that you can choose the appropraiate sound palette to work with (scale type(s) for melody / riffing, and chords that can built from the scale(s)). But nothing stops you choosing additional chords outside of the scale, or other pitches outside of the scale.

Think of what sort of song structure you want, to break the tune into sections (verse, chorus, bridge ...) and then think how you want each section to be (time signature to use, number of bars, and how you want to populate time across those bars). You can do that with little to no regard for note choice.

With a strong and repetitive time layout, this really sets the foundations to build on, and to make music that is memorable (so long as it's not really complex). You need to remember that there are common psychological expectations and emotions across an awful lot of listeners (they hear something and anticipate something comig next) ... if you don't satisfy this most of the time, you won't connect with them.

Then (or at same time) you can choose melody / riff notes from your palette ... here is where you need to be aware of tone tendencies, so learn about these). An important part of this is "establishing the key centre" ... this includes use of the chord tones of the scale's triad built off the scale's root (e.g. if you're using C Harmonic minor (like Yngwie), then the C minor triad pitches could feature strongkly melodically.

Similarly, chord progressions are created to also define the key centre.

That's the 1000 mile high outline for one approach that can get results pretty quickly ... especially when stuck for initial note choice.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Sep 28, 2016,
#10
Playing good solos is a bit different from writing good songs. I would say playing good solos has a lot to do with technique. And since you have only been playing for 5 months, you just don't have the technique to play a guitar solo that would sound that great. Just practice and learn a lot of guitar solos. After some time you will most likely naturally start coming up with your own solos.

If you want to write songs, the vast majority of songs have chords in them. Yes, even Gary Moore's songs and metal songs have chords in them.

A good song and a good solo are two different things. If you want to write an actual song, the guitar solo is one of the last things you should worry about. First things first. If you want to write metal songs, riffs are one of the most important part of them. You may want to start with a guitar riff and build the song around it. You can solo over that riff later, but first you need something to solo over. But I wouldn't really worry about the solo yet. Come up with the basic song structure, melodies, harmonies, that kind of stuff before worrying about solos. A good solo is not a good song and a good song is not a good solo.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115