#1
I'm currently in a band and I wanna have an EP, 4-5 songs, recorded by this time next year. I plan on recording it myself. Any advice?
#3
If you have no previous recording experience and no recording gear at this point I recommend you buy the Tascam DP 24. It has everything you need to make a good recording and not have to mess with computers hard drives, ram, latency, interfaces and all the associated hiccups that you might (probably will) experience along the way. It's also something that you can just pickup and take with you to the place you are recording then pick it up and go home. It records to an SD card, has many decent internal effects and basic but usable mastering facilities for the final mix. It records up to 8 channels and each of the 24 channels has 8 virtual channels for a total of 192 channels of recording space though you need to choose 24 tracks for the final mix. Since the recording is saved to an SD card as .wav files you can easily remove the card from the recorder and transfer all your 24 final tracks to a computer and use any recording software you are familiar with to do you final mix if you want to.

That's how I do it. I have my original Tascam 2488 24 track and last year I bought the upgraded Tascam DP-24SD. I do 90% of my work on the Tascam then either transfer a final mix to my computer and master it with T-Racks Deluxe Mastering suite and burn it to a CD or transfer all my tracks to my computer and mix with Sonor then go to T-Racks.

I bought my Tascam DP-24SD from Musicians Friend on a "Stupid Deal of the Day" for $349.00. They normally sell for about $100 more. Either way it's a great sounding recorder and it's all there in one incredibility affordable price. I also recommend the Tutorial DVD from David Wills. For $25 it takes you through every feature of the Tascam and David really knows his stuff.

Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Sep 27, 2016,
#4
^ that's a very valid option as well.

You could also go with the hybrid approach - portable multitracker that turns into an audio interface, like the Zoom R series, R16 or R24 to be more precise as they can track enough channels at the same time.
#5
You could get a fairly inexpensive interface to line in record guitar/bass/vox
and program drums for the time being for the EP
just an idea
#6
Depending on your budget and experience, it may well be worth programming drums.

If you are good and have good software it can be just as good in a mix, and in the case of beginners it will often sound better.

Micing and tracking a drum kit properly is not easy. Unless you really know what you are doing, what I would suggest is record the drummer's performance using one or two mics just to capture what he is playing, and then transcribe it to MIDI. That way you have his performance being played by a drum machine.

Vocals bass and guitar are relatively extremely easy to record.
#7
I'm gonna be honest with you, man.

If you know nothing and expect to do a 4-5 song EP by next year... Find someone else to do it and watch them. What are they doing and why?

As important as mixing is, recording is more important. Guitar and bass are easy enough. Vocals? Vocals are a goddamned ART.
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400 with Gotoh GE1996T (EMG 85/60)
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#8
Quote by oneblackened
I'm gonna be honest with you, man.

If you know nothing and expect to do a 4-5 song EP by next year... Find someone else to do it and watch them. What are they doing and why?

As important as mixing is, recording is more important. Guitar and bass are easy enough. Vocals? Vocals are a goddamned ART.


Well said!

I'd have to add that for good musicians the engineer doesn't have to do much but put the right mic and stay out of the way.
#9
Quote by diabolical

I'd have to add that for good musicians the engineer doesn't have to do much but put the right mic and stay out of the way.

+1. The single most important thing about the studio is getting your material together, well before you enter the studio.
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400 with Gotoh GE1996T (EMG 85/60)
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#10
Quote by oneblackened
I'm gonna be honest with you, man.

If you know nothing and expect to do a 4-5 song EP by next year... Find someone else to do it and watch them. What are they doing and why?

As important as mixing is, recording is more important. Guitar and bass are easy enough. Vocals? Vocals are a goddamned ART.


well said for $400 you could get a good recording from a Studio with your bands ready to record all in a day or 2

if you want to get into recording the Tascam is a basic good first step but is does have it's limits ,.if you have a computer and want to learn DAW software Reaper a $100 interface and a sm58 could do the job for $300 ( tho recording Drums is hard with such a lower budget be it Tascam or DAW computer )

the more you get into DAW the more money it costs ,the more time you have to spend learning to art of recording BUT the better the quality can get.

learning to record is just like learning a instrument your NOT going to sound good with your first attempt.