#1
Hey guys like the thread name says I need some advice. When im improving I typically end my licks on the root note or tonic. Is there another note I can end on so it doesnt sound repiticious?
#2
Chord tones, so you're not obsessively focused on scales and arpeggios within the context of your own instrument and listen to the entire band context instead.

As long as you're playing tonal music, chord tones are always relevant, and harmony is not just about one instrument - it's about the parts coming together.
#3
^This You want to improvise lines that move through the chord changes in a logical manner.

What that logic is is different for everyone, but that's the idea.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#5
Awww yeah getting that Jerry approval! You rule.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#6
Just to add on, a lot of the time this stems from riffs that just kinda stay on one root the whole time without having really having an underlying progression, and if you then write licks to fit with riffs like that they suffer from the same thing. It can help to think about the riff as moving through a chord progression, even if there aren't any actual chords being played, and you don't have to stick strictly to the progression - the underlying progression outlined by chord tones is still there giving it more of a sense of momentum. So you can think, "ok, the riff is moving towards more of a G chord" and accent the G B and D notes, which is what they mean by chord tones. You can be really straightforward with the chord tones and really hammer them home, or you can be more loose about it and scatter them around a little more and still retain that sense of movement. I've found it works best for me if I don't exactly figure out a chord progression first and then write a riff around it, more like I'm writing the progression as I hear where I want the riff to go, but it can help at first just to break out of the repetitive riffs if you give yourself some constraints and lay out the progression you want to follow before hand. And you may have to follow the progression more closely when writing parts for multiple instruments to keep them sounding cohesive. Just play around with it.