#1
Hi guys, I've been saving up for a better guitar rig for a while now because my band has started getting gigs in larger venues. I've always been fond of the deep saturation in the hi-gain channels of the dual rectifier but wanted something thats a bit more versatile and sounds better on the clean side as well. After a bit of research i found the roadster which (by description) is exactly what I am looking for. I just need some outside opinions from people that have played or owned them and have any thoughts or opinions that i should consider. Also would you recommend getting a head and a cab, or a combo

thanks for the help !
#2
I just recently bought a RoadKing. The Roadster is based off the RK, minus the Progressive Linkage in the power section. Anyways, I love it. There's not many more versatile amps out there. It takes a lot of tweaking to get the most out of it, but it's worth it. Cleans are great, the crunch mode on ch2 sounds good, and of course the high gain Recto tones are available.

I definitely lean towards the head/cab route. It's more versatile and easier to try different speaker combinations.
Ibanez UV777 - Carvin TL60 & 727 - Jackson KE3
Splawn QuickRod - Mesa Stiletto & RoadKing - Peavey Ultra+ - Peavey Bandit
Some pedlulz & cabz


7 String Legion
#3
It's a great amp, no doubt about it, but it's got its own unique sound which of course isn't for every one, so the golden rule of try before you buy applies here. If you decide to buy it, there are a few things to consider a 212 combo would cost less but head and a 212 cab would be easier to carry around + it gives you more options tone wise.

If you're not dead set on the recto high gain sounds and versatility is your main concern you might want to look into something like Mesa Mark series or Peavey Ultra series (Ultra Plus or Jsx for more actual versatility or XXX for more insane gain) or maybe Randall RM which a lot of people recommend but I haven't tried one myself.
#4
I have the Roadster 212 combo.

The tones available from it are versatile and very good. From Fender cleans to bluesy to rock to crunch to then you get to Channels 3 and 4 - Raw, Vintage, and Modern.

The 212 literally weighs 100 pounds but comes with casters. It's small and dense.
Guitars:
Ibanez RG1570 Prestige
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#5
The Roadster is a beast, one of Mesa's best. It's got it all, but in a way that's different from, say, the Mark V. I personally prefer the Mark series for versatility, but the Roadster is every bit as flexible and sounds awesome.

I'd go head and 212 personally, easier to manage, but if you decide on the combo, it'd be worth getting a hand-truck to move it around if you're going to do that a lot, one with knobby tires for less than smooth rolling surfaces. Get some straps on it and you are good to go WHEREVER you go.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#6
I love my Dual Rec Roadster 2X12 combo it is the most vesatile amp I have ever owned maybe not as versatile as the Mark/RoadKing series but it goes from crystal clear "Fender" cleans to bone crushing high gain and everything in between all in an easy to dial in package.

I recommend the 2X12 combo you can always add another 2X12 cabinet later if you need to and they make them to match exactly.

Here is mine I will not be parting with it anytime soon if ever!

"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge