#1
I was curious about a few things. First how do you follow chugging (palm-muted power chords) on a drumset. I know it's important in stuff like breakdowns, Metalcore, Deathcore, and Djent. I might not play drums but I program them in FL Studio.

Second, where would the pulse be in the last part of Meshuggah's "Elastic"? It's so fast, crazy, and polyrhythmic that it's hard to find. Although according to a converter, the tempo might be 172.5 BPM.


I know these are weird questions but I'm really curious and think the answer would be interesting. ...
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
Last edited by RonaldPoe at Sep 29, 2016,
#2
Like you, I am not a drummer, but I have done a lot of work programming and writing drum parts for heavy music.

If we are talking about a simple chug pattern like:

D----------------------------
A----------------------------
F----------------------------
C----------------------------
G---000-000-000-000-
C---000-000-000-000-

Then, assuming we are using a 4 count and a half time time beat the drums would go something like this. (Crash, snare, kick):

C---x----x-----x----x------
S----------------x-----------
K---xxx-xxx-xxx-xxx-

So the crash usually holds the 4 count, the kicks follow the chugs, usually hit-for-hit, and the snare placement determines the feel of the part. If the snare were hitting every quarter note, but the crash and kicks stayed the same, it would sound totally different.

That's a very simplistic example. If we are talking about how Meshuggah do things, they use far more polymeters/polyrhythms than most metal/deathcore bands which is going to be very difficult to explain if you don't know how polymeters and polyrhythms work.

An extremely simple polymeter would be a guitar/bass line that repeats in counts of 4 (aka 4/4 time) but with a drum pattern that repeats in counts of 3 (aka 3/4 time).

Meshuggah use ridiculous counts like 9, 11, 13, 15 etc but generally they are always laid over a 4 count. I don't know Elastic very well at all, but one example I can think of is the main riff in Do Not Look Down from Koloss. The pattern follows a 17 count, but if you listen to the crash cymbal it is keeping the 4/4 time. This creates a polymeter, as 4 does not fit into 17.

Another song which uses a simpler version of this using counts of 3, 4 and 5 is Quasimodo by Monuments. There are times in the song where the same riff is played on the guitars and bass, but the snare placement on the drums totally changes the movement of the riff by changing the count from 3 to 4 and vice verca.

Hope this helps.

Pretty sure all my definitions and jargon are correct here but if not sorry in advance to any theoryheads who may read this!
#3
Thanks Random3, I think I get supporting chugging now and your jargon sounds right. I linked the part of the song I was referring to (it starts at 0:17). I mainly want to find the basic pulse and/or rhythm for that part (the one where all the songs on Chaosphere and then some are synced into chaos). I believe the snare is on the 3rd beat in 4/4 quarter note (that's what Meshuggah used to do during their first few albums) though. I've done plenty of research on Polymeters, polyrhyhms, and Djent.

Here's a link to a great song off Meshuggah's Chaosphere. Hope it helps a little (it's part of the aforementioned chaos).
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).