Poll: Which bass would you consider the best for a starter?
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View poll results: Which bass would you consider the best for a starter?
Ibanez GSR200
3 50%
Epiphone Toby Standard IV
0 0%
Epiphone Toby Deluxe IV
0 0%
Yamaha RBX174
3 50%
Voters: 6.
#1
Greetings everyone!
Some time ago i made a thread on here about wether i should get a bass or an electric guitar. Turns out i chose electric guitar since alot more people recommended it for me to start with the electric.
Ever since then i've been practicing daily but since school begun i gathered some rust. And electric guitar simply doesn't motivate me since it's not what i aimed for at the start, i picked it up to learn the basics.

So yeah, essentially it's time for me to get straight to the low end. My questions are
1) Im on a tight budget, and i need a bass to fill my needs for punk rock, hard rock and alt rock. So far i've come across these models that seem interesting to me: The Epiphone Toby Standard/Deluxe IV bass, Yamaha TRBX 174 and Ibanez GSR200.
2) I obviously need a bass amp. I was aiming for the Fender Rumble 25 but someone said that bass amps are an entirely different thing compared to electric guar amps. While you can practice on a 5W amp on guitar, on bass he said you need at least 40W for decent practice. Is this true? Do i really need the 40 W version considering for now all i want to use the amp for is practice and a bit of home studio/recording?

Thanks everyone!
I'll add a poll in here with the basses mentioned. Suggestions regarding other starting basses are welcome.
#2
Ibanez, Yamaha and Epiphone are all good brands, about the only way to decide which bass YOU want is to listen to them all and decide which sound appeals to you the most. As far as amplification, I've got a Fender Rumble 100 watt and absolutely love it with my Fender Blacktop Precision bass - of course I play blues and jazz so I don't know how well it would fit with your musical genres. I always practice with headphones plugged into the amp, which mutes the speaker. You'll find pictures rattling on the walls pretty quick running a bass amp at any sort of "fun" volume
Last edited by Jack Strat at Sep 29, 2016,
#3
What's your budget? Buy used.

Squier VMs are a great value. Buy used. Plenty of Jazzes out there, but a Precision would be suited well for your genres. I would pick this http://www.guitarcenter.com/Used/Ibanez/SRX300-Electric-Bass-Guitar-112252836.gc over any of the basses you mentioned. Buy used. As far as amps go, if you're only using it for bedroom practice etc, low wattage is fine. Buy used. But if you want to jam with some peeps, you will likely go unheard. Buy used. You can turn down a loud amp, but you can't turn up a quiet amp. Buy used. Guitar Center has a used 75w Peavey Basic 112 combo for $70. That with the bass I mentioned would be a great start...for $220!!!!

In case you didn't pick up on it, buy used. Especially being that you don't really know what you want. If you buy used and don't bond with it, you can sell it in a couple of months and likely get all of your money back to put toward something else. Buy new and don't bond with it, you're going to take a hit when you sell it. Doesn't matter if you only have it for 2 weeks, you'll take a hit. Over the past 30 years, I've bought quite a bit of equipment, new and used. Of all my current gear, I paid for not one piece of it new. Check my profile, I have a lot of gear. Used gear is full of value. New gear is overvalued. Spend wisely.

Good luck!
"Quick to judge. Quick to anger. Slow to understand. Ignorance and prejudice and fear walk hand-in-hand."
- Rush, "Witch Hunt"
#4
Look used as well.

Play lots of basses.

Notice how your left hand feels with each neck.

Make some notes of observation.

Look for the word "inspiring" in your notes.

Buy the bass that has that word in its notes.
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#5
+1 to buying used if possible, and to checking out the Squier Vintage Modified, Classic Vibe, and Ibanez SR/SRX series if they're within your budget.

However I do understand that not everyone lives in an area with a great selection of pre-owned gear, so assuming you're buying new, not knowing your budget, and going off the basses you asked about I'd recommend the GSR200. The RBX is a solid beginner bass as well, honestly either one would be a fine starter instrument.

As for the amp, if you're just practicing by yourself really just about anything will do (not to say that there aren't better or worse practice amps, there are). With bass you generally want headroom much moreso than with guitar. If you are for example, playing with a band, you want to be able to turn up to an appropriate volume without clipping. In that case 200w+ would probably be a good starting point. If you're just practicing at home a little amp will do just fine, a bigger consideration should be whether you think it sounds good or not.

Most importantly, if you live near a store go there and try out the gear you're considering buying if possible. There's no substitute for try-before-you-buy and at the end of the day the most important thing is that YOU like it.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#6
^To add. My old bass teacher had the best advice--buy accessories on line, but instruments and amps in person. Besides why deprive yourself of a wonderful hour or two playing instruments in a local shop or talking up someone who is selling their old gear. There are far worse ways to spend your time.
#7
Quote by Tostitos
+1 to buying used if possible, and to checking out the Squier Vintage Modified, Classic Vibe, and Ibanez SR/SRX series if they're within your budget.

However I do understand that not everyone lives in an area with a great selection of pre-owned gear, so assuming you're buying new, not knowing your budget, and going off the basses you asked about I'd recommend the GSR200. The RBX is a solid beginner bass as well, honestly either one would be a fine starter instrument.

As for the amp, if you're just practicing by yourself really just about anything will do (not to say that there aren't better or worse practice amps, there are). With bass you generally want headroom much moreso than with guitar. If you are for example, playing with a band, you want to be able to turn up to an appropriate volume without clipping. In that case 200w+ would probably be a good starting point. If you're just practicing at home a little amp will do just fine, a bigger consideration should be whether you think it sounds good or not.

Most importantly, if you live near a store go there and try out the gear you're considering buying if possible. There's no substitute for try-before-you-buy and at the end of the day the most important thing is that YOU like it.



Yeah, you got the no decent music store near me thing right. And GC, Amazon or e-bay won't deliver here ( Romania). Think they are affraid of vampires :p

Anyway i was considering stretching my budget and going for the SR300 in the Ibanez as i heard good things about it from someone who likes the same genres/bands/artists as me. But i also heard your plucking hand will hurt since the pickup positions make you feel awkward when playing. Anyobe can confirm? I was looking at the ESP LTD B104 and F104 too but heard all they're good for is metal.

And now the big deal. I have slim hands (but pretty average fingers for my age, 16) and im a My chemical romance fan so, is it worth getting a Squier Mikey Way Mustang bass? The things that made me consider this bass are the amazing killer looks, the humbucker and of course the signature.
But think i would preffer holding a badass huge axe to give that rumbling fear, considering i height 5'10" -ish
#8
As far as the Mikey Way sig I'd say be wary unless you can try it first. The Mustang is a short scale bass (30") so it plays and sounds quite a bit different than anything else you're looking at. I'd recommend sticking with one of the other basses you were looking at for a first bass if you're buying blind, they're a little more on the "jack-of-all-trades" side of things. Slim hands shouldn't worry you either, I'm a bit smaller than you with abnormally little fingers and I manage just fine on a full scale, as do many of us small-handed folks.

As for the LTD thing, you can certainly play more than metal on them. The F series has a "metal" shape and people tend to associate the brand with metal but saying that's all they're good for is as silly as saying you can only play jazz on a Jazz Bass. Honestly all three (SR300, B-104, F-104) are pretty similar layout wise. Those pickup positions shouldn't make playing feel awkward, those positions are fairly standard. If that makes your hand hurt then it likely means you just need to adjust your technique.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#9
As far as amplification is concerned I think you have a very simple choice. Almost any practice amp will make enough sound for you to practice and most of them sound OK, just don't spend too much. The problem is they often lack deep bass and the sound is not always brilliant. Obviously a lovely deep bass sound will make you want to practice more but you need something more expensive to get that. So, you could choose to go for something that will let you play with other people and for a bassist that means something that will be loud enough to play with a drummer. Probably something with 200W and 2x10" or a 15" speaker. The trouble with the 50-100W combos is that they are too big and more expensive than you strictly need for practice at home but not enough for working with a band. If you want a big sound at home then practice with headphones. Go for the smallest Fender and use the cash to save up for a 'proper' amp later.

As to bass I'd look at all the suggestions but with small hands myself I'd say look at a Fender Jazz copy rather than Precision style bass, the J has a much thinner neck which is much more comfortable than the chunky P neck. Confusingly even Fender themselves sometimes put J necks on P basses and a lot of copies have J necks but it is worth knowing. There are loads of good quality basses from the likes of Yamaha, Ibanez and Cort but I'd say that a Squier or other Jazz copy is a great place to start. The VM's and CV's are both worthwhile but the plain old Sqiers are perfectly playable.

Welcome to the deep side
#11
Quote by anarkee
^To add. My old bass teacher had the best advice--buy accessories on line, but instruments and amps in person. Besides why deprive yourself of a wonderful hour or two playing instruments in a local shop or talking up someone who is selling their old gear. There are far worse ways to spend your time.


considering how friendly some of the shops are around here, I'm not sure "wonderful" is the word I'd use to describe it

also, as tostitos said regarding the used gear, it sort of is dependent on whether you actually have any decent shops nearby which have stuff in stock which you want to buy.

don't get me wrong, i totally agree that if you have good local shops which are only too pleased to let you try everything you want, and which have a great range of stock as well, that you absolutely should try stuff out. Just not everyone is that lucky, unfortunately.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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#12
Quote by SneKisser
Phil Starr

What about a Vintage Modified Jaguar?
Seems slick <3
Nothing other than that I haven't tried one. The best thing is to always try them and if they feel good put them on your list. I always swore I'd never go for the big name basses as I'd end up paying for the badge not the bass. Yet despite my prejudice I've ended up with USA made Fenders, one jazz, one precision because to date they are the nicest sounding and playing instruments I've found. The P is an American Deluxe which came standard with a jazz neck which just suits my small hands and the way I play. When you are starting feel is probably more important than sound so if it feels good ......