#1
Hi,

I play Electric guitar and also play my friend's acoustic guitar. I just got a chance to play classical today for like 4-5 minute and it's sound great.

Which guitar do you like the most and why?
#2
I prefer the sound of nylon strings. I have several guitars: acoustic steel string, electric and classical but my most-played guitar is a dreadnought style acoustic guitar on which I have replaced the original steel strings with a set of high tension nylon ones. I probably do 75% of my playing on it.
#4
Well the reason I put the nylon strings on the acoustic guitar in the first place - and it was over 10 years ago - was to play through an amplifier - my classical guitars do not have pickups so I put the strings on one of my electro-acoustics that had a simple passive piezo pickup.

But I liked the way the guitar played and sounded so much that I left the strings on. Classical guitars have wide flat fretboards whilst the acoustic guitar has a narrower radiused fretboard. I use it mainly for folk music (my main genre) and I think it works well.

Here is a little vid:

#5
Can you help me with something? Should I get acoustic or classical? I used to play acoustic and like I mention, I only play classical for only 4-5 minute.
#6
I'm primarily a steel string player, and use medium gauge strings, but I also play nylon string, just for the difference in sound and feel. I've tried putting nylon strings on a steel string guitar, even a Martin from their transitional period, but it didn't work for me. However, I have put nylon strings on a parlor-sized resonator guitar, and that is pretty good, loud and somewhat flamenco-like.

I don't think anyone can tell you which to get, because it comes down to personal preference. Even playing style doesn't really favour one over the other, except perhaps for nylon string for classical, Latin and flamenco.
Last edited by Tony Done at Sep 29, 2016,
#7
Basically, Nylon guitar is limited to some genre? What if I want to play pop music? And yes the reason I want to classical guitar is because I want to play Classical music but not latino or Flamenco. Acoustic guitar is better for folk & popular music especially for camp fire but I don't know about Classical.
#8
Nylon is probably more versatile than steel string, and I don't see any real handicap in using a nylon string for folk and pop. I think it is more about cultural traditions than suitability. Here's some good toe-tapping stuff, and Rodrigo is using a pick on his nylon strings:

#9
I like my steel string guitars much better. The classical has a wide neck that annoys me. Maybe when I get better I'll grow to appreciate it. It's a pretty Cordoba.
#10
Quote by sosxradar
Can you help me with something? Should I get acoustic or classical? I used to play acoustic and like I mention, I only play classical for only 4-5 minute.


That choice is up to you. Why not visit a music store and try a few different acoustic and classical guitars. They play and sound different to eadch other so you have to choose which you prefer.

Or why not buy one of each - my only guitars for many years were one steel string acoustic and and one nylon string classical. I was quite happy with just the two guitars for over 30 years. Now I have a few more LOL.
Last edited by Garthman at Sep 30, 2016,
#11
I got it!!! A Yamaha C-150.

I think the neck is bend but I don't know and I'm making a new thread on this. Please consider helping me out!

I never like the sound of Acoustic since the first day I learn piano for 1 week and then bought electric guitar and play some metal music! I think I found my favorite sound, It's Nylon!

Anyway, thank for me helping me out! Please take a look at my new thread because I think that the guitar neck is bend.
#12
Just to be pedantic... Both are "acoustic" guitars. (As is any guitar that does not depend on electronics to make noise) One is a nylon-stringed instrument, and the other is a steel-stringed instrument.

Usually.... Trying to put nylon strings on a steel-string instrument is a poor idea. These strings only have about half the tension of a set of steels, and there's not enough energy to produce decent sound. Also, because nylon strings have a great "amplitude of vibration" (they move more...) you have to adjust the action to get them not to buzz.

Of course, electronic amplification will help with the volume problem. The modern "crossover" nylon-string guitar is set up pretty much like a steel string with a narrow neck, radiused fretboard, and the like. If it's set up right, it can work.

As to preference.... Two different beasts in my opinion. If I want to play country or bluegrass, I'm going to want a steel-string dreadnaught, and likely one set up with medium-gauge strings. That's just the standard.
I play mostly nylon-stringed instruments now... I've been concentrating on fingerstyle jazz for some time. Steel strings are just too hard on the nails.

You'll always find some maverick that chucks all the standard advice... Look at Willie Nelson.
#13
Bikewer

Yeah I've tried nylon and a steel string guitar and not been wild about the result, even on a guitar designed for both - a 1925 Martin - but it works for Garthman, so I'm not knocking it. A problem I see is the fairly narrow neck on most steel string guitars, not well suited to the greater excursion of nylon strings. I've got nylon strings on my reso parlor guitar, it has a farily wide neck and sounds soemwhat flamenco-like. I could happily live with just a good (and IMO not many are) nylon string for fingerpicking these days, I would still want steel for slide though.
#14
i played classical guitar before acoustic, and after i started playing acoustic i found that i prefer the sound of acoustic far more.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#15
patticake

This isn't a loaded question, but have you ever played a really good nylon string? I've only ever played a couple (one of which was a cheapo), and it came as a major revelation to me after years of playing steel strings. Nothing like yer average Cordoba or Yamaha.
#16
Quote by patticake
i played classical guitar before acoustic, and after i started playing acoustic i found that i prefer the sound of acoustic far more.


My first guitar was a classical upon which I learned the rudiments for 2 years. I then bought a steel string acoustic and pretty much played only that for the next 20 years (albeit with many long interludes of not playing hardly at all due to wife, kids, houses, work, etc). When I returned to playing regularly I rediscovered my love of nylon strings and whilst, I also play steel string guitars, acoustic and electric, the bulk of my playing is now on nylon and I suspect will probably remain so.
#17
Quote by Garthman
My first guitar was a classical upon which I learned the rudiments for 2 years. I then bought a steel string acoustic and pretty much played only that for the next 20 years (albeit with many long interludes of not playing hardly at all due to wife, kids, houses, work, etc). When I returned to playing regularly I rediscovered my love of nylon strings and whilst, I also play steel string guitars, acoustic and electric, the bulk of my playing is now on nylon and I suspect will probably remain so.


I bet you get all the bitches wet. Something about classical guitars is so romantic & sexy. I wish I knew how to play one.
Some see the glass half full, others see the glass half empty. Me? I see that the glass is refillable.
#18
Garthman

I also played a nylon string for a couple of years when I was young, and even had a few classical lesson, and have recently returned to it to some extent, though my main interest is now evolving from Spanish position fingerpicking and slide to lap steel.

NewDayHappy

I agree, if you want a sexy romantic image as opposed to an outright macho one the nylon string does it. It worked for me, and I can still make the ladies smile with Tom Paxton's "Last thing on my mind".