#1
hi there
i don't know why we should play more than three notes when we want play a triad chord !!
for example in G major chord we must play G B D but in the G major chord we playing G B D B G
why ??? just for beautiful music ?? or other thing
#2
It's all about the sound - the order of the notes and which exact notes are played really changes what you hear. Certain voicing accentuate different notes and that has an impact on the listener.
#3
You don't have to play the two G's if you don't want.Infact you don't even have to play the root note at all if you don't want.You decide what sounds best to you in the context that you are playing.
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#5
Should?

Music theory will just describe what is going on. It says "this is what happens", not "do this".

This is more of a physics question that also has a guitar component, though.


The more notes that are ringing, the richer the chord will sound, because some frequencies and harmonics are doubled. xx323x will not sound as strong as xx0231, with a doubled octave. The octave emphasizes the first harmonic of the low D string that vibrates freely.

This "restriction" does not apply to instruments not set up like the guitar as well. In piano, it's easier to play across multiple octaves and add even more repeated notes. All that does is emphasize the chord notes that play.

When you get to jazz and extended chords, though, it's hard to play all notes in the full chord, so people choose notes based on closeness, relative importance, and context.
#6
The open G chord is just one way of playing the G major chord on guitar. Whether you should play a full 6-string chord voicing or a three-note voicing really depends on the sound you are after. As said above, doubling the notes in the chord will make it sound richer. But sometimes that's not the sound you are after. There are many different ways of playing the same chord on guitar.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

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#8
Quote by broken-spades
thanks . so we play that for better sound

Well, whether it will sound better depends on the context. If you are accompanying yourself, playing full 6-string chord voicings will usually work best because you don't have any other instruments playing with you so you kind of need to compensate. But if you are playing in a band with other instruments, playing full 6-string voicings may make the sound of the band too full and the overall sound may lack clarity.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
Because the guitar has 6 strings, basically. If you're strumming, it's more difficult to mute 3 strings than it is to double up any triad notes within reach so you can strum 5 or 6. IOW, playing 3-string chords is harder than playing 5 or 6 string chords.
Of ocurse, having 6 strings means there's more variety of choice in chord voicing (shape, arrangement of notes), so more sound options are available. A guitar with only 3 strings could certainly play any triad chord, but you'd have a very restricted choice in shapes, and in moving from one chord to another.
Last edited by jongtr at Oct 2, 2016,