#1
Hello,

I have played my Squier Strat for about 3 years now and before getting a new electric I've decided to buy an acoustic guitar. I know in terms of guitar playing 3 years isn't a lot and I have so much to learn but at this point I'm pretty sure that guitar playing is going to be my hobby for the rest of my life. So for that reason I want to get a decent acoustic right away.

Now I've made some decisions already:
  • I'm going to buy the guitar from Thomann because there's no point to buy the guitar from the shops in my country since they have less to choose from and everything is more expensive and even delivery might take longer. I also bought my electric from there and a bunch of other guitar stuff. I trust them and I'm not interested in buying from elsewhere.
  • I want a dreadnought guitar because it seems to fit me the best. As I've understood it's more of a strumming guitar and I'm not going to play fingerstyle anytime soon.
  • Cutaway or not.. From the start I've wanted a cutaway guitar. Maybe it's because I come from electric but they just seem right to me but in the last few days I'm not so sure anymore. Mostly because cutaways are so much more expensive than regular ones. Good example is Guild D-140 regular and Guild D-140 cutaway. 140 euro difference just because of the cutaway. It's ridiculous. So it would be great if I could get a cutaway but I've come to the conclusion that it's not that important. I just want a quality guitar and if I can get the same exact guitar without cutaway for 100 euros cheaper then I'll probably choose that.
  • Price.. I don't really want to set a harsh limit but let's say that going over 900 euros would be stretching my budget. Ideal price would actually be around 700-800 euros but like I said I want to get a quality guitar right away so I don't have to think of buying a new one after a few years. So even if it goes a bit over 900 euros I'm fine with it.


I've browsed the Thomann site and currently one of the better choices to me seem to be the Guild Westerly series guitars. The best in that series would be the Guild D-150 but it's quite expensive. Second choice from that series would be Guild D-140. Now I'm wondering if the D-150 is worth the extra 200 euros?

So please if you have free time and want to help out check what Thomann has to offer and maybe you can make some recommendations to me. Also any general tips regarding acoustics are appreciated. Thanks

PS! Please don't tell me to go to a store and find what I like from there. First of all, it's a lot of trouble for me to get there since I don't live in a city and there aren't a whole lot of stores or at least big guitar stores in my country anyway. Besides I already went to probably the biggest guitar store in the city about a month ago but it didn't really help me at all. Most of the guitars there were under 400 euros and they were all really dusty and had rusty strings.. I think most of them were Yamahas with a few Takamines and Fenders. None of the guitars that I tried in there really stood out for me.
#2
Welcome to the forum.

I don't know much about modern Guilds, as they aren't very common in my part of the world.

The two I would be looking at are the Taylor 110 and 210. They aren't very flashy, but they are very well made* and they have a big, open sound that many like.

*Warranty work a can be a major issue if you don't live in the country of manufacture, since it is the importer's responsibility. Taylor guitars have a neck which is very easily and cheaply resettable in that event that the geometry deteriorates over time due to string tension, and the action gets too high over time.

EDIT Whatever you choose, budget for a set up. I've found that much of the feel of modern guitars is related to set up, and I can get used to just about any guitar that is well set up. Unfortunately tone is something you can only evaluate by playing the guitar, and, at least for me, the differences between like and not like are often quite subtle. In spite of all this, I have had great success with mail order. - It's a bit like arranged marriages - the participants make it work.
Last edited by Tony Done at Sep 30, 2016,
#3
I just hate choosing a guitar without holding it in my hands but this story seems to be the new normal. Guild make quality instruments and I have enjoyed every one I have played. Roll the dice, pick one, and if you hate it, send it back??
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis
#4
Quote by Cajundaddy
I just hate choosing a guitar without holding it in my hands but this story seems to be the new normal. Guild make quality instruments and I have enjoyed every one I have played. Roll the dice, pick one, and if you hate it, send it back??

Yeah I guess. If i really don't like the guitar I'll get (which I highly doubt) I can always send it back, they even have a 30-day money back guarantee.


So currently I'm between these 3 guitars:
Taylor 110e
Guild D-140CE SB Westerly
Guild D-150 Nat Westerly

The biggest pro for Taylor is obviously the price. I viewed some videos of it on youtube and it really looks and sounds good on the videos. Unfortunately there are some cons as well. As far as I could tell the electronics on 110e aren't that good which pretty much makes them pointless. Also the case or the gig bag as they call it seems worse than the one that comes with Guilds. I was also surprised that they come with medium 13-56 strings. I mean these are the heaviest strings for acoustic, right? I feel like I would prefer 12 strings and I think every acoustic that I've touched so far has had 12s.

About the D-150, I didn't notice it before but apparently the regular Guild westerly acoustics don't have electronics in them as opposed to cutaway versions which are acoustic-electric. So I guess that's why the price difference is so big. Now I probably wouldn't use the electrics that much but it would definitely be a cool feature to have. So I guess that's a con for D-150 as well as the price since it's the most expensive.

There are different versions of D-140 and right now I put the sunburst cutaway version as it looks the best but again I'm not sure if it's really worth 900 euros.

I think I'm leaning towards Taylor right now mostly because of the price but then again I'm not 100% sure. Maybe someone has something to say that will help me in my decision making

EDIT: I didn't notice that the Taylor has laminated back and sides. I think that makes me lean towards Guild again..
Last edited by mairo93 at Oct 1, 2016,
#5
Opt for the Taylor 110 . Beats anything at it's price by a country mile. Plus you won't have to worry about super expensive neck problems because of Taylor's bolt on neck.

I think Guild is overrated.
Last edited by TobusRex at Oct 1, 2016,
#6
Taylor, Martin & Guild you cannot go wrong with any of those brands but a name I think you should check out is Takamine. I own a Martin D-16GT which is a $2,000 guitar in your country & my Takamine EG523SC which cost me half the price keeps up with it. I love my Takamine, I baby my Martin but the Takamine is my workhorse. Check them out.
Martin D-16GT
Takamine EG523SC
'17 Gibson Les Paul Standard
60s Gibson Les Paul Tribute
'16 Fender MIA Stratocaster
Blackstar HT-1R
Marshall DSL5c
#7
mairo93

The biggest plus for Taylor is their construction, the lower price is a bonus and you aren't paying for cosmetics. You can always buy a hard shell case with the guitar, and if you aren't using the electronics I wouldn't worry too much about it. - You could always invest in a good soundhole pickup if you ever need to amplify it. - FWIW, I prefer these to piezos, and I only have one acoustic now with a piezo system, and that is out on loan to my daughter.
#8
Quote by mairo93
...[ ]....The biggest pro for Taylor is obviously the price. I viewed some videos of it on youtube and it really looks and sounds good on the videos. Unfortunately there are some cons as well. As far as I could tell the electronics on 110e aren't that good which pretty much makes them pointless. Also the case or the gig bag as they call it seems worse than the one that comes with Guilds.
Well, there really is too much bull shit on the web about "piezo quack" and whatnot. Most of it is generated by guitar snobs and people who simply can't think of any other setting than "10" on their controls, This is particularly true of people who have blown out their high frequency hearing with electrics turned on "11". Taylor's pickup system is about as good as anyone else's in the price range. They do limit the amount of boost and cut of their tone controls, ostensibly to avoid the issues I've just described.

Personally, I consider electronics mandatory, and would not own an acoustic without them. This is an homage to all the wonderful ambiance effects available, chorus, reverb, delay, and what have you. Also, Electro Harmonix has come up with an extended line up of guitar synth effects, which DON'T require a hex pickup. Personally I have their "Pitchfork", (octave multiplier), and their "Mel9 Tape Replay Machine", which produces many of the effects of the ancient "Mellotron".. So, you don't need electronics to play louder, but you can call up whether you're playing in a church, a hall or wherever you choose. If you play a song with a capo on the neck, you can dial up a sub octave to restore the bass loss from said capo. If you want to play The Beatles, "Eleanor Rigby" you can dial up the "cello" setting on the Mel9, and have glorious strings fill up the spaces between the guitar's notes.

As far as the laminate back & sides of the Taylors go,their backs are molded for projection, which simply can't be done with solid wood parts. Any one of we here will tell you, you're honestly better off with laminated sides, and the solid top on any acoustic, is the biggest contributor to good sound..

What many people don't know is, that the old Guild jumbo 12 strings, once considered the standard of the world, and very pricey, share that very same molded, laminated back.

Quote by mairo93
I was also surprised that they come with medium 13-56 strings. I mean these are the heaviest strings for acoustic, right? I feel like I would prefer 12 strings and I think every acoustic that I've touched so far has had 12s.
Well, many acoustic players consider ".013 to .056 as "standard. That's a "medium set". You can get heavies, which IIRC tape out to .014 to .058. Yeah, they're a real handful.

Keep in mind manufacturers ship with the strings they feel will make the best first impression on their buyers.Myself, I don't use anything heavier than "lights" which are the ".012 to .053" sets you're talking about.

Quote by mairo93
EDIT: I didn't notice that the Taylor has laminated back and sides. I think that makes me lean towards Guild again..
I explained this above ^.

The "Mexi-Taylors" (1xx & 2xx series), are indeed, as plain as mud, even to the point of having a semi gloss varnish finish. I'm actually wondering if that may contribute to better sound than the stiffer poly gloss finishes. I have a Taylor 150e 12 string and it sounds fine to me, varnished or otherwise. It follows the standard Taylor design in that, the body is slightly shallower than dreadnought standard, (to prevent "boom" (?)), along with the laminated , molded back.
These are somewhat the notoriously best sounding twelves at anywhere near the price.

Another guitar you might want to consider is the Taylor 114e , what they call a "grand auditorium". The waisted design usually leads to tighter bass, (although slightly less of it), and a slightly more, "lap friendly" instrument.

Taylor does admittedly, (I'm admitting it for them, they never will), rip you off for the cutaway. Most mid line guitars offer electronics & cutaway together, as the step up package. It's actually a bit difficult to find 1xx & 2** Taylors without electronics.

Odder still is (IMO) Epiphone, who on several of their models, include a solid top (!), electronics, and cutaway, as a single package, when going from acoustic only to E/A!

For whatever it's worth, here are videos of the 2 SFX I described above:



Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 2, 2016,
#9
Thanks for all the help guys, I really appreciate it. I've decided to go with the Taylor 110e I should get it next week and I'll probably post my first impressions here. Can't wait
#11
Captaincranky

FWIW, I agree with you about lam b&s, I have no prejudice against them. In fact in the lower price ranges, I think that they might be a better bet than solid - I would rather had good lam than bad solid any day, for tone and/or sturdiness.

I was wondering if you have ever tried combined piezo and magnetic? I did for a long time, running through an active blender/preamp, latterly the Baggs Mixpro, but in the end I simplified it to magnetic only.
#12
Better to try guitar in store, even if it is same model.. it may sound different, bigger brand names have better quality control, so the instrument should be of quality and may be similar sounding.. I still recommend going to a local store to test the guitar out.. then buy online if you can get better savings.
I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.