#1
Hey,
I am currently trying to re-write Demi Lovato's Heart Attack for my band, and I have a few questions about the drums. Being that Heart Attack is a Pop Song, there are a lot of Drum Machine things that I want to change to be traditional drum set things (Like Electric Snare Drum to Acoustic Snare Drum, Electric Bass Drum to Acoustic Bass Drum, Remove Hand Claps, Traditional Drum Cymbals, etc.), but I have no clue what the numbers mean. I read a thing on this website here: http://mrgott.com/misc/22-how-to-read-drums-on-tab-pro-ultimate-guitar
And it made sense until I went to do it. If anyone can simplify what ALL the numbers in a drum tab means and how their positioning on the staff makes a difference, if any, I would be a really happy composer.

Thanks!
#2
What may be helpful is to just view the percussion legend on Guitar Pro (View > Percussion). Hopefully this should be all you need.
Where you position them on the staff makes no difference to how they sound, but I always try to lay them out in a way that makes sense with their position on the drumkit, e.g. bass drum on lowest line, snare on 3rd line up, crash cymbals on highest line, hi-hat just below, toms around the snare or just above.

#4
Quote by NSpen1
What may be helpful is to just view the percussion legend on Guitar Pro (View > Percussion). Hopefully this should be all you need.
Where you position them on the staff makes no difference to how they sound, but I always try to lay them out in a way that makes sense with their position on the drumkit, e.g. bass drum on lowest line, snare on 3rd line up, crash cymbals on highest line, hi-hat just below, toms around the snare or just above.




I do basically the same thing - bass drum on the lowest line, snare on the line above, toms on the line above that (if two are played at the same time I'll put the lower one on the snare line), hi-hat and ride on the next line (sometimes ride on the line above) and the remaining one or two for splashes, crashes, and oddball stuff like cowbell and wood blocks. Once you've got a little laid down you can just look back at previous measures if you have trouble remembering the numbers, but after a while you'll have most of the normal ones.


Something else I do when tabbing drums that helps me visualize what's going on is I figure out what the smallest note duration I'm going to use is and fill the bar with rests (usually 16th or 32nd note rests) and then fill in the hi-hat, bass, snare, etc. Having the extra rests already filled in makes it easier to add things in or move them around. A lot of times I'll start out simple and just hit 42 r r r 42 r r r 42 r r r 42 r r r (if I went with 16th notes) to get hi-hat on 1 2 3 and 4, then listen to where I think the bass and snare should go, then by doing that I may decide I want the hi-hat on the off beats or faster or that I want a different pattern and add or shift around the hi-hat, then by doing that it may make me want to change the bass and snare, etc. Usually for each section of the of the song I'll come up with the "basic" drum beat, copy and paste it for however long I want that beat going, and then go through and add the accents and fills. Sometimes if I've got the same rhythm or feel going and don't want to really change the beat, but feel like I want the drums to be faster or slower, louder, etc. the easy thing to do is just mess with the "tick" (don't know the terminology, not a drummer) so replace the hi-hat with a ride or double the hi-hat/ride so it's faster, or half it so it feels slower, or change it to a crash, etc. while leaving the bass and snare pattern the same. Makes for an easy transition if the guitar/bass/whatever is holding the same basic groove, but the riff changed or even when the same riff is going but you want to change the feel a little.

Not the question that was asked, but it got me thinking about how I tab drums and I felt like sharing