#1
Yesterday I bought a 2012 Gibson les paul special p90 for $600 used. While playing it a bit today, I noticed a few things, the nobs are a bit crooked, the switch plate wiggles around, the strings buzz, and am able to push the pick ups down and they pop back up. Is this normal? I new to Gibson.
#2
You can probably tighten the switch nut a bit to stop the plate from wiggling around. Strings buzzing is a setup issue most likely and not a structural issue with the guitar. Being able to push the pickups down is fairly normal if they're high up, since there should be springs or foam underneath to adjust the height. Why you'd push them down is beyond me, though.

Crooked knobs are a minor production fault (or it got knocked somewhere). Not sure if and how you can fix it.

I'm wondering how you didn't notice these issues when you tried it yesterday. Did you try it?
#3
Quote by I K0nijn I
You can probably tighten the switch nut a bit to stop the plate from wiggling around. Strings buzzing is a setup issue most likely and not a structural issue with the guitar. Being able to push the pickups down is fairly normal if they're high up, since there should be springs or foam underneath to adjust the height. Why you'd push them down is beyond me, though.

Crooked knobs are a minor production fault (or it got knocked somewhere). Not sure if and how you can fix it.

I'm wondering how you didn't notice these issues when you tried it yesterday. Did you try it?
yes, but the knobs don't bother even, just wanted to make sure everything else was normal, new to Gibson. When I tested it, I just loved the sound of the p90's and knew I had to have it. Can I fix string buzz with adjusting trust rod?
Last edited by Couchguitarist at Oct 2, 2016,
#4
If it's one of those guitars with the wrap around bridges you cannot intonate then no wonder the previous user sold it lol. Those bridges are awful.

You need to actually know how the guitar is currently set up before you can make adjustments based on any rhyme or reason for doing them. What is the action at the 12th fret? What is the neck relief?
Quote by Axelfox
Please understand how little we as a community care
#5
I will admit I don't know much about guitars( only been playing 4 yrs now), but I do know it is not a wrap around, the strings go through the bridge.
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
If it's one of those guitars with the wrap around bridges you cannot intonate then no wonder the previous user sold it lol. Those bridges are awful.

You need to actually know how the guitar is currently set up before you can make adjustments based on any rhyme or reason for doing them. What is the action at the 12th fret? What is the neck relief?
#6
If you're willing to learn how to setup your guitar yourself, I'm sure there are good guides out there to be found. If not, take it to a tech and have him set it up. It'll be done properly and it doesn't cost an arm and a leg.
#7
Quote by I K0nijn I
If you're willing to learn how to setup your guitar yourself, I'm sure there are good guides out there to be found. If not, take it to a tech and have him set it up. It'll be done properly and it doesn't cost an arm and a leg.
Thanks I will do that. I got the guitar for $600, other than the acoustic string buzz, I love it, do you think it was a good buy?
#10
T00DEEPBLUE

AFAIK, the Specials had stop tailpieces - for example, my '95 does. Even with a stop bridge, overall distance can be set with grub screws on each side, the big differences is thse design for a wound third, and more modern versions designed for a plain 3rd.

Couch, noen of the issues you mention is a big deal, they are all fairly easily fixable, and springy pickups are normal when they are body-mounted.
#11
Quote by Tony Done
T00DEEPBLUE

AFAIK, the Specials had stop tailpieces - for example, my '95 does. Even with a stop bridge, overall distance can be set with grub screws on each side, the big differences is thse design for a wound third, and more modern versions designed for a plain 3rd.

Couch, noen of the issues you mention is a big deal, they are all fairly easily fixable, and springy pickups are normal when they are body-mounted.
Thanks, big relief. I love the guitar so far and would hate to have to return it.
#13
Quote by Tony Done
I like mine too, but it is a bit heavy for my tastes.
it is a big step up from my Squier. I was originally planning on getting a Mexican Strat until I found this.
#14
Quote by Couchguitarist
Thanks, I think I will bring it to a tech tomorrow

Why take the guitar to a tech and pay an extortionate amount of money for doing something you can do yourself for free with the help of tons of free and perfectly adequate online resources, and probably do a better job than said local guitar center dunderhead? In my opinion, people should know how to set up their own guitars just like anyone owning a car should be expected to know how to change the engine oil and change a wheel.

I'd rather set my guitar up myself with the peace of mind knowing I did the job properly. Than to pay someone a silly amount and with no guarantee that they'll set it up the way I like it.
Quote by Axelfox
Please understand how little we as a community care
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Oct 2, 2016,
#15
Couchguitarist
I should have mentioned that I'm a big fan of P90-type pickups - single coil, screw poles. Mine has P100s (stacked coil, parallel-wired humbuckers), which get a bad rap, but mine work just fine through my carefully set up amps.
#16
Quote by Couchguitarist
Yesterday I bought a 2012 Gibson les paul special p90 for $600 used. While playing it a bit today, I noticed a few things, the nobs are a bit crooked, the switch plate wiggles around, the strings buzz, and am able to push the pick ups down and they pop back up. Is this normal? I new to Gibson.


You are just new to used guitars that have been bashed by other players. Most of this has nothing to do with gibson or Gibson guitars, but it has everything to do with fixing what the previous owner screwed up. And next time you buy a 2012 Gibson Les Paul Special P90 for $600 used, you will have spotted all those issues before you take it home.
#17
Quote by Couchguitarist
Can I fix string buzz with adjusting trust rod?
yes, but only if that is the problem. Most likely you need to raise the bridge a little bit. If you look down the neck, it should look very straight and maybe have a small curve towards the fretboard side. If it curves backwards a truss rod adjustment might be in order. First thing i would do is raise the bridge until it stops buzzing and then lower it and look for reasons why it buzzes. Crooked knobs could mean that the pot's posts are bent or they are crooked inside the guitar-not a problem if they work.
Last edited by geo-rage at Oct 3, 2016,
#18
Quote by geo-rage
yes, but only if that is the problem. Most likely you need to raise the bridge a little bit. If you look down the neck, it should look very straight and maybe have a small curve towards the fretboard side. If it curves backwards a truss rod adjustment might be in order. First thing i would do is raise the bridge until it stops buzzing and then lower it and look for reasons why it buzzes. Crooked knobs could mean that the pot's post are bent or they are crooked inside the guitar-not a problem if they work.
thanks, I will try that. The knobs I don't really care whether they are crooked as long as they work, which they do.
#19
Quote by Couchguitarist
thanks, I will try that
it's easier the adjust the bridge when you slack the tuners off alot. Its a lot of tuning but thats how it goes. Also when you raise the bridge you should also adjust the tailpeice as well. You know, to avoid an extreme string angle over the bridge.