#1
I realize I'm shooting for an incredibly small niche here, but does any know of or have experience working using translating skills in any languages for guitar companies?

I ask this primarily because I'm sitting at my desk at work (as a Japanese translator) looking at guitar videos all day wondering if there's some way I can finesse my way into working in a field I actually like and have a passion for.

Unrelated:
John Sykes rules.
#2
Would translating work at a guitar company be any different day to day than any other industry?
Also is translating work something that companies do in-house? I would have thought they just contract from businesses who specialize in that?
Asking out of curiosity.
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#3
you should work at a travel agency in los angeles

you would make bank

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#4
Gatecrasher53

It used to be pretty in-house oriented work until the economy crash spurred many companies to start hiring people on a more contractual basis. I actually have no idea how it would work at a guitar company, and my gut tells me that there probably wouldn't be much of a need unless they were starting up in another country and looking to localize certain company paperwork or something like that. Maybe I should be looking into Japanese guitar magazines or something like that. Might could at least freelance by translating articles and interviews with people like...Marty Friedman??
#5
Translator reporting in

It really depends on the company. If it's a big one, there's bound to be an international market and documentation to go with it. Documentation being press releases, marketing material and instruction leaflets/technical specifications and all that stuff.
In my experience the latter is quite often (badly) done by machine translation (i.e. some intern runs it through google translate). Mostly it's not interesting for the companies to actually spend money on it, as its such a minor part of what they're selling.

Marketing material and press releases tend to either be written for the target languages directly or go to a dedicated agency. It's hard to find companies with dedicated translation departments (mostly only really big multinationals have them), let alone among guitar producers, where localised documentation doesn't play an incredibly large role.

I'm afraid it's not very likely you'll find yourself translating for guitar companies often. You can specialise in musical subjects as a freelance translator or try to find an agency where you can do that in-house, but as you said, it's a very niche market as far as translation goes.
Quote by redwindmh
Maybe I should be looking into Japanese guitar magazines or something like that. Might could at least freelance by translating articles and interviews with people like...Marty Friedman??

It's an option, but it would probably be easier to become an editor if magazines are your goal. Nine times out of ten they'll ask editors (or freelance editors) to translate articles if necessary.
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Last edited by ultimate-slash at Oct 4, 2016,
#6
Quote by redwindmh
I realize I'm shooting for an incredibly small niche here, but does any know of or have experience working using translating skills in any languages for guitar companies?

I ask this primarily because I'm sitting at my desk at work (as a Japanese translator) looking at guitar videos all day wondering if there's some way I can finesse my way into working in a field I actually like and have a passion for.

Unrelated:
John Sykes rules.

Yamaha could probably use you
Not as badly as they could've in the 90's but Yamaha or Ibanez or any marketing department of any Japanese company could probably use you
#7
Ultimate -Slash is correct in that it's not likely you could get a full time job out of this at all. my brother teaches English in China and does translations for business contracts but that isn't even close to a full time gig for him. I think you'll find that having a proper concise translation for guitars, amps and pedals isn't a high priority for most companies.
#8
Thanks, everyone (especially Ultimate-Slash!). I guess I'll just stick to freelancing for now. ESP just redirected me to their website. Fuckers. Still gonna spam their youtube channel until they hire me in some capacity.

Am I petty? Yes. But does it get results? ...Nope. Never. Not even once.
#9
Well, good luck in any case
kitty on my foot and I wanna touch it
meow meow meow meow meow meow