#1
Hey all,

So, as the thread title states, I'm wondering if a capacitor swap in one of my guitars might be a good idea?

I've got a rather hot bridge pickup installed in the bridge of one of my V's (Not sure of the output in Mv, but the DC resistance is over 16k). It has a nasty, aggressive bite, and thick tone that is really nice for metal, and I'm close to where I want to go with the guitar tonally, but it's still a bit muffled and muddy sounding (like a blanket over the amp), even with amp treble up pretty high.

I was told that I should try a 1 meg tone pot to try and get some treble/clarity back in my sound (and that lower value pots bleed off more treble), but that I could also try a capacitor swap to roll off some low end/make the bottom end more clear and tight. Is this all true? And what would be a good cap value to go with? This is the last thing I want to try before uninstalling, and selling to fund a different pup to try.

Thanks in advance!
- Gibson Flying V 120 #1 (White)
- Gibson Flying V 120 #2 (Cherry)
- Gibson SG Standard ('61 style)
- Jackson DK2M

- ENGL Fireball 60
- Avatar 4x12

- Many pedals, plus other stuff
#2
Do you use your tone pots? If you're just running everything on '10' all the time then I would argue a change in value will not be audible for you. What are the values of your pots?
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#3
If you don't use tone pots (having them always maxed out) then changing the cap will make no difference.

Tone controls do not roll off low end like you're describing whatsoever. All a tone control does is filter off highs. You need a balanced amount of treble for your low end to have definition between notes.
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#4
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Do you use your tone pots? If you're just running everything on '10' all the time then I would argue a change in value will not be audible for you. What are the values of your pots?
I typically leave everything on 10, but there was an audible difference between the stock pot, and the one in the guitar now. They're both rated at 500k, but the stocker tested a bit low (~460k), and the one in it reads slightly high (~520k). The pickup had less clarity w/the stock pot.

T00DEEPBLUE - I was never told (or have ever audibly perceived) that rolling back tone rolls off lows. I've been told though, that different cap values can bleed off low end from a pickup signal (regardless of where the tone knob is at), helping to tame the bass on a dark sounding pickup. Just trying to find out if there is any truth to this?
- Gibson Flying V 120 #1 (White)
- Gibson Flying V 120 #2 (Cherry)
- Gibson SG Standard ('61 style)
- Jackson DK2M

- ENGL Fireball 60
- Avatar 4x12

- Many pedals, plus other stuff
#5
Quote by FlightofIcarus
I typically leave everything on 10, but there was an audible difference between the stock pot, and the one in the guitar now. They're both rated at 500k, but the stocker tested a bit low (~460k), and the one in it reads slightly high (~520k). The pickup had less clarity w/the stock pot.

T00DEEPBLUE - I was never told (or have ever audibly perceived) that rolling back tone rolls off lows. I've been told though, that different cap values can bleed off low end from a pickup signal (regardless of where the tone knob is at), helping to tame the bass on a dark sounding pickup. Just trying to find out if there is any truth to this?


Sorry if I wasn't clear but I was implying changing cap value wasn't worth it. Not your pots. Personally, I have swapped caps quite often in my guitars, the only difference was when the pots where engaged. At 10, they didn't sound different for me. I like use a lower value cap (compared to standard) to retain the high end when I lower my tone pot though and that has an effect but again, only when I'm actually using it.


Higher value pots will make the signal brighter so going up to 550k or 1Meg might work. You could also disconnect them from the tone pots to brighten them up
Quote by Axelfox
my mom and i went to a furry con and on the second day she said she didn't come and pay money to go see dumb shit.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#6
Quote by FlightofIcarus
I typically leave everything on 10, but there was an audible difference between the stock pot, and the one in the guitar now. They're both rated at 500k, but the stocker tested a bit low (~460k), and the one in it reads slightly high (~520k). The pickup had less clarity w/the stock pot.

T00DEEPBLUE - I was never told (or have ever audibly perceived) that rolling back tone rolls off lows. I've been told though, that different cap values can bleed off low end from a pickup signal (regardless of where the tone knob is at), helping to tame the bass on a dark sounding pickup. Just trying to find out if there is any truth to this?

Interesting, although I'm not sure how that would work. The frequencies that carry the highest amount of power are the extreme lows and a tone capacitor doesn't invade such a space in the frequency band without taking out all of its highs and mids. So basically if a tone control rolled off all the lows, you'd end up with all the signal effectively going to ground I would've thought.

Do you have any sources that explain?
Quote by Axelfox
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Oct 7, 2016,
#7
H4T3BR33DER - Thank you! That's what I needed to know (Whether to try both a pot and cap swap, or just the pot). Hopefully a 1 meg does the trick. Knowing me though, I'll probably be tempted to continue swapping pickups anyways, in the event that it does

T00DEEPBLUE - I remember reading something about it on the Seymour Duncan forum once, but it was something a forum poster claimed. I've yet to read any explanation of how it would work, hence why my research on the matter continues.
- Gibson Flying V 120 #1 (White)
- Gibson Flying V 120 #2 (Cherry)
- Gibson SG Standard ('61 style)
- Jackson DK2M

- ENGL Fireball 60
- Avatar 4x12

- Many pedals, plus other stuff
#8
Or, just disconnect the bridge pickup from the tone pot completely.
Dave @ Seymour Duncan
#9
Quote by Mincer
Or, just disconnect the bridge pickup from the tone pot completely.


I was thinking the same thing. It's a quick test to see if any tone pot or cap value will do what you want.
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims