#1
Hey Guys, I am just brain storming atm with two pedals I have with loose jacks. (Not the kind fixed with viagra.) One Behringer, other older ibanez sound tank.
The cables can be pulled out super easy. Thought of just dropping some super glue on them but if I can fix to retain normal usage, that's better.

Both jacks are the enclosed black box type that are soldered to the board and not easily (that I have tried) changed?

I tried using a metal hook to bend the contacts back without success but is there any other possible fix I just haven't thought of?

Make me feel stupid and tell me a super easy answer I didn't consider!
#2
I wouldn't use super glue, it may mess them up irreversibly.

In what sense are they loose? Are loosing signal? Is the jack (plug) falling out? Or is the plug just wobbly when you insert it in?
#3
Preventing this in the future: Put the pedals (even if there are just two of them) on a pedalboard so that they don't move around. Lock down your guitar cable INTO the pedal by cable tying it onto the pedalboard at that end. Nothing moves, so nothing loosens up.

Do NOT USE SUPERGLUE ON YOUR PEDALS.
That would not be brain storming, but it would be brain fart (ing).
There are worse things, but they usually involve motorcycles and they begin right after the words, "Hey, watch THIS!"
And, like supergluing pedals, they often end badly.
#4
How about making the socket bore a bit smaller with some kind of internal shim to get a friction grip on the plug sleeve? A strip of shim brass, or even aluminium drink can, firmly attached on the outside might do it.

Or, if you always use the same cords, deform the plug sleeve to get a tighter friction fit.
Last edited by Tony Done at Oct 10, 2016,
#5
I bought Jacktight for loose jack on guitars.. it should work on pedal jack as well..

wait, i just realize that the jack on pedals are held by the hex nut outside of enclosure.. make sure you tighten the hex nut that way they don't fall off.. if you lose some.. just go to local hardware or buy them online.
I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.
#6
All you have to do is (very carefully) bend the jack tip back down toward the lugs. The tips have a curved bit that engages the tip of the plug, holding it in. Over time the jacks get a bit loose and need to be bent back down a bit to hold the plugs tightly again.

You could also just buy some new jacks.

Both these options require you to open up the pedal and new jacks would require soldering. If you are the type who doesn't want to mess with either of those then you can find someone who will or you're pretty much s.o.l.
#7
Quote by Invader Jim
All you have to do is (very carefully) bend the jack tip back down toward the lugs. The tips have a curved bit that engages the tip of the plug, holding it in. Over time the jacks get a bit loose and need to be bent back down a bit to hold the plugs tightly again.


Usually that's what I'd do, but he said it's the type that's enclosed in a plastic housing and soldered directly to the pcb, so that's pretty difficult to do. I guess with a poking tool of some kind a a flashlight it might be possible, but it'd be way easier to just replace the jack.


Quote by bass.desires
Both jacks are the enclosed black box type that are soldered to the board and not easily (that I have tried) changed?


You'd have to get some replacement jacks, desolder the old ones, clean out the holes, and solder in the new jack. Desoldering and getting the old solder off is the hardest part, but it's not too bad if you get a spring loaded solder sucker and take care not to let the pcb get too hot.

If you've never soldered anything before there are plenty of videos on youtube. Here's a good one:



And for desoldering:



It's not really that difficult. Keeping the tip clean is the most important part.
#8
Quote by The4thHorsemen
Usually that's what I'd do, but he said it's the type that's enclosed in a plastic housing and soldered directly to the pcb, so that's pretty difficult to do. I guess with a poking tool of some kind a a flashlight it might be possible, but it'd be way easier to just replace the jack.


What I've done is use a tool to lift up the leaves from the underside (via the plug hole so no desoldering is needed) and then use it as a fulcrum to bend them back down a bit, if that makes sense. Not really any more difficult than dealing with an open jack.
Last edited by Invader Jim at Oct 11, 2016,
#9
The problem with the cheap behringer is that it just just very easy to remove but does need just a little bit of movement. The ibanez soundtank is even worse, if you breath on the cable the plug pops out about an 1/8". Both are on the pcb. I may just look into finding replacements and swapping them on a sleepy afternoon but may just try shimming the plug with a piece of business card or something. Thanks guys for the tips. (oh the pun)
#10
Quote by bass.desires
The problem with the cheap behringer is that it just just very easy to remove but does need just a little bit of movement. The ibanez soundtank is even worse, if you breath on the cable the plug pops out about an 1/8". Both are on the pcb. I may just look into finding replacements and swapping them on a sleepy afternoon but may just try shimming the plug with a piece of business card or something. Thanks guys for the tips. (oh the pun)


Ha.

Did the cable popping out thing always happen? I've seen cheap plugs (and jacks) that weren't even made to proper spec. In one case it was a plug that was too short to properly engage the jack and in another case it was the jack being bent in the wrong place and not engaging the plug. I've seen both scenarios a few times but only with really cheap parts.
#11
Invader Jim I got the ibanez for super cheap (almost free) and the behringer for $15. I didn't notice the problem with the behringer until later but the ibanez I just figured i could fix if I even used the pedal. I have the day off mostly so I might see if a shim will help the behringer. It isn't terrible but scares me for it to pop out during a song.
#12
Quote by bass.desires

If you've got some copper shielding tape,
you can make a small shim for your connector plug.
That might help to secure the connection as a temporary solution.

You might be able to use aluminum foil too,
but copper seems to be the choice material for most regular electronic cables anyways.
#13
Those cheap plastic jacks that solder to the board are such a pain. I removed one once, soldered on a cord with a female end on it, then jb welded the female plug to the side of the stomp box. No one here will think that it's acceptable but it might happen again.
#14
Quote by psp742
I bought Jacktight for loose jack on guitars.. it should work on pedal jack as well..

wait, i just realize that the jack on pedals are held by the hex nut outside of enclosure.. make sure you tighten the hex nut that way they don't fall off.. if you lose some.. just go to local hardware or buy them online.
I/m not sure, but you may have missed the TS point. The "Jacktight" tool, merely serves to hold the socket while you tighten the retaining nut.

The trouble I've encountered, and I suspect the TS has as well, is a bad connection by either the hook shaped positive terminal of the jack not contacting the plug with enough force, or a bad solder joint, causing an intermittent signal to the amp, and/or noise from extra resistance.

bass.desires If a loose nut on the socket is an issue, there is also a product called "Locktite 242". This will lock threads, but still allow disassembly with normal hand tools. Remember, "super glue is forever", whereas "Locktite" is not. There are compounds which will dissolve CyA adhesives, nitro-methane being one of them. That, and others with the same capability, will damage finishes, and take longer in the process.

For anybody with loosening jack nuts, IMO, this is the best solution: