#1
Hi!

I am a newbie in recording so don't kill me please .

I want to buy some monitors for recording/mixing but I have no idea what to try/buy.

I was looking on KRK monitors or Yamaha but I really don't know what to choose. I play guitar and I want to record through my Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 .
All advices and recommendations are welcome . Thank you !
#4
Get a pair of Yamaha HS5s. For value, they're probably the best. I use the 8s when tracking and haven't had any issues.
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#6
I don't know. None of those cheaper monitors are great or flawless. And everyone seems to have different opinions on which ones are the best in that price range. So maybe you could look out for some used monitors, get them for cheaper price, and they will probably be OK. In that price range nothing is going to be spectacular, but all of them can work for what you want. My freind has M-audio BX5 which have been mentioned by diabolical, he is satisfied with those.
#7
I have a pair of Yamaha HS5s next to one Ikey cheap Chinese red cone Speakers and one Gemini red cone speaker http://geminisound.com/product/sr-5 I got the cheap red cone monitors because they were 100 watt and wanted to save my Yamaha HS5s from being damaged at high volume ( hey I practice with 2 Full stacks so i like abit of volume ) these 2 ebay purchases cost under $100 USD in total an electrical engineer friend said the spec was the same and said " hey there probably from the same factor" so bid and won them from 2 different sellers,. together I have a hard time telling the difference to the Yamaha HS5's yes there is a minor difference if you want to hear it ,. but I would NOT bet in a blind test you would be able to tell which better

YES BUY STUDIO MONITORS there is a world of difference in a flat amp and speaker matched pair for sure ,.one day I want to setup a surround sound home theater with 7 Studio monitors !!! but don;t think you have to spend top dollar for your home studio
Last edited by T4D at Oct 13, 2016,
#8
I am on Alesis Monitor One MK2's passive with power amp and am quite happy for what they are. Sadly, they're discontinued but can be found used as mentioned.

I have another friend that needed something cheap for the occasional mix and he got these Insignia (Best Buy store brand) http://www.bestbuy.com/site/insignia-5-1-4-2-way-bookshelf-speakers-pair-black/8959098.p?skuId=8959098 and they're quite good for what they are, he's running them with a 70s stereo tuner.

I think the main idea for a speaker is for you to know what to listen for. The home stereo and computer speakers are usually hyped up in some way that prevents you listening objectively and mixing in the most system neutral way.
#9
Quote by diabolical
I'm with The Chemist on the HS5s for the $. The KRKs are pure garbage IMO, I rather recommend M-Audio BX5s instead.


I dunno about this KRK thought man. Nick Wollage (tracked the Bourne series soundtrack, LotR, PotC) uses Rokit 8s when recording at AIR, so something about them works
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#10
Quote by the chemist
I dunno about this KRK thought man. Nick Wollage (tracked the Bourne series soundtrack, LotR, PotC) uses Rokit 8s when recording at AIR, so something about them works


He uses them while recording or while mixing? It's a big difference. Also it's a big difference between rokit 8 and rokit 5 which are in his price range. I haven't tried any of them, but I have heard lots of not so good reviews on them.
#11
Scoring, to be specific.
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#12
Quote by diabolical

he's running them with a 70s stereo tuner.

I think the main idea for a speaker is for you to know what to listen for. The home stereo and computer speakers are usually hyped up in some way that prevents you listening objectively and mixing in the most system neutral way.


your sending mixed message here a 70's stereo is a BAD idea and for the reason you ended with consumer sound gear is hyped or try'es to enhance and make the sound better and each product and manufacturer does it differently SO your song will sound alot different on a Sony compared to a Iphone


studio monitors try to be neutral and honestly you will go WOW when you get a good pair home the difference is Amazing compared to you normal sound gear
#13
You use what you know, so the guy uses Rokit and takes them on location. The 8s are a bit better, but I don't like them.
I once did an album on phones and $150 M-Audio monitors. Between the headphones and the cheapie monitors, it worked out. It wasn't the most comfortable tracking and easiest mix, but the band was happy with the results.

About the Insignia recommendation and old home amplifier, I was actually surprised how neutral they sounded and are definite steal at this $. I won't recommend them in lieu of specialist monitors but for $70 you can't get any that sound even half decent.

There was a Sound on Sound interview with big shot producer and he swore on his $600 bookshelf B&W speakers. Tbh, I got a pair at the time as I was interested and they worked great.
#15
Maybe I'm hijacking this thread: but for beginner recording/mixing use, would reference headphones (say KRK) be a good option vs. monitors in an untreated space (bedroom or garage), or both for best results? But if you could pick one, what would it be?
"If you want beef, then bring the ruckus." - Marilyn Monroe
#16
Quote by USCENDONE BENE
Maybe I'm hijacking this thread: but for beginner recording/mixing use, would reference headphones (say KRK) be a good option vs. monitors in an untreated space (bedroom or garage), or both for best results? But if you could pick one, what would it be?


Depends on which headphones and which monitors. Good headphones can be bought for a lot less than good monitors. Having both would be the best. But the most important thing is definitely to know how does your system sound, no matter what kind of system you have. Still, between those two, maybe having monitors would be better for most people. If you have the opportunity to use them whenever you want (that means if no one is giving you shit for using them).
#17
USCENDONE BENE

I know that for mixing, monitors are recommended . For recording some good headphones can do the job.
#18
I usually go A/B between headphones and monitors as I can't always blast my system and now do most of my mixing on headphones due to that the fact that it happens at night. Then I blast them through my speakers when I can, but overall I can't mix on monitors full time at home.

With that in mind, you could definitely achieve good results if you're familiar with your headphones and monitoring system. There are some guys that do really well with headphones and home stereo, some guys even listen on earbuds as now the general public would use an iPhone and earbuds to listen to music. As long as you know what you're doing and cross check your mixes across different systems to ensure that it translates well you should be fine.

If you can - monitor system is best. If you can't - then high end headphones and some kind of stereo system could also work, like bookshelf stereo and those Insignia speakers can do really well

Headphones - I use two pairs, AKG 240 MKII and DT770. The reason I do that is because I am really comfortable with the 240's but they are a touch bass light so I check my bass on the other pair, plus the other is an ISO pair which I use while tracking loud sources. The thing with the 240's is that I've used them in so many studios I am very familiar with their sound so I can make critical judgments based on that.
#19
Quote by diabolical
I usually go A/B between headphones and monitors as I can't always blast my system and now do most of my mixing on headphones due to that the fact that it happens at night. Then I blast them through my speakers when I can, but overall I can't mix on monitors full time at home.

With that in mind, you could definitely achieve good results if you're familiar with your headphones and monitoring system. There are some guys that do really well with headphones and home stereo, some guys even listen on earbuds as now the general public would use an iPhone and earbuds to listen to music. As long as you know what you're doing and cross check your mixes across different systems to ensure that it translates well you should be fine.

If you can - monitor system is best. If you can't - then high end headphones and some kind of stereo system could also work, like bookshelf stereo and those Insignia speakers can do really well

Headphones - I use two pairs, AKG 240 MKII and DT770. The reason I do that is because I am really comfortable with the 240's but they are a touch bass light so I check my bass on the other pair, plus the other is an ISO pair which I use while tracking loud sources. The thing with the 240's is that I've used them in so many studios I am very familiar with their sound so I can make critical judgments based on that.


Always use both, agreed. I've even setup my monitoring with earbuds just to hear how it sounds there too.
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#20
diabolical

Why can't you use more often the monitors ? The space doesn't allow you to turn up the volume or the neighbors ? xD

Btw. When I am mixing with monitors I need to listen the track at a very high volume ?
#21
Quote by andreyush
diabolical

Why can't you use more often the monitors ? The space doesn't allow you to turn up the volume or the neighbors ? xD

Btw. When I am mixing with monitors I need to listen the track at a very high volume ?


Well, he said that most of the mixing happens at night in his case, so I guess that explains it.

There is no rule about that. Some people actually prefer to do it in not so high volume, because everything tends to sound better when it's louder. Sometimes getting a good sound at lower volume means that a mix will sound even better on high volume. The opposite never happens. Also, you will get a lot more ear fatigue listening to loud music al the time. But I would also like to say that you should always try to check your mixes on as many different system and volumes you can.
#23
Quote by andreyush
diabolical

Why can't you use more often the monitors ? The space doesn't allow you to turn up the volume or the neighbors ? xD

Btw. When I am mixing with monitors I need to listen the track at a very high volume ?


If you have to consistently raise your voice to speak over the monitors, they are too loud.
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#24
andreyush because I'm married

You also have to learn to protect your hearing, especially if you're trying to have some kind of career doing thing. So volume should not be louder than regular conversation in a room.

Also - avoid long exposure, let your ears rest. I'd say 1-2 hours per song when mixing, after that your critical judgment goes out the window, so take a break and revisit.
#25
I'm 100% in agreement with diabolical. Sometimes I'm so into a mix I don't realize that the volume is slowly creeping up and as time goes by I am redoing the EQ on things that really don't need any further adjustment. I save a lot of mixes and I am often surprised by how often my balances improved from the first mix to the last but often my earlier overall EQ was better. I need to take a break (a quiet break) every hour or two or I loose perspective.

I have three sets of monitors. My old JBL Studio Series monitors that I have had for about 30 years (passive 10"), a set of Behringer Truths B2031 and my favorite all round monitors a pair of Halfler M-5 (great small monitors that can get very loud and clear). The old JBL monitors don't really sound good compared to either of the other two but I like to use them for comparison purposes on final mixes. Before going into the active Behringer speakers I have a dedicated rack EQ that is set up to flatten the Behringers. They tend to be a little bass heavy. Nice mids and highs but a little heavy on the bass. I have an old ADC spectrum analyzer that have used to EQ the Behringer speakers to my room. It's old but still works.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#26
I think I am gonna buy studio headphones too .

I am looking at Audio-Technica ATH-M40. Are these good? Is the Audio-Technica ATH-M50/x worth the extra bucks ?
#27
Quote by andreyush
I think I am gonna buy studio headphones too .

I am looking at Audio-Technica ATH-M40. Are these good? Is the Audio-Technica ATH-M50/x worth the extra bucks ?


I have m50x and i'm in love with them. definitely worth the money.
#28
Quote by andreyush
I think I am gonna buy studio headphones too .

I am looking at Audio-Technica ATH-M40. Are these good? Is the Audio-Technica ATH-M50/x worth the extra bucks ?


Both are good solid pieces of gear. I own AKG 240 MKIIs which are kinda like the "industry standard" as most studios have these. I also have another pair, Beyer DT770 Pro which are closed back and I use these mostly when tracking loud sources or need to pinpoint the mic position on a loud guitar cab, snare drum, etc.
#29
I use AKG K99s. Super light, flat.

Of course, I also own about 4 pairs of the old Fostex cans which are phenomenal.
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#30
I own M50s, they're great cans.

I'm currently running Focal Alpha 65s as my monitors. They're great, but a bit out of your budget, I think.
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Focal Alpha 65 monitors
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You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#32
Quote by diabolical
I also like the K99s, not as refined as my other choices but are very revealing of a mix shortfalls.


Definitely the best headphones for editing and classical recording. They reproduce exactly what is put into them, nothing more or less.

I'd avoid Audio Technica cans for anything but for tracking... the bass tilt on them renders them useless for critical listening.

I'll expand and indicate why both headphones and monitor are recommended for recording:

Monitors are great for long drawn tracking as they definitely don't fatigue your ears for long periods of time, the cans are great for critical spot monitoring but can make your ears tired after a limited amount of time.

In editing, monitors don't let you get the same uninterrupted sound, so you may think something needs to be edited via monitors, but you learn that it was wind/your chair/your neighbour making noise. Headphones give you isolation and a lot of intimacy with your track.

Mixing is usually done on monitors. You'll use headphones as a reference to see how the mix is translating to a close environment (like headphones). I have some earbuds set up so that I can test a mix on the old earkillers as well. Never fully mix on headphones unless you a) don't have another option, or b) know the physics behind what headphones do and how to mix around it.

Mastering is 100% monitors. Headphones are useless in mastering UNLESS you need to check for truncation or to verify your dither shape is working correctly. Trust me, dither shape makes a TONNE of difference to your mix's overall polish. If you use POWr dither, Shape 1 is for more open (acoustic or moving mixes), Shape 2 is mostly for rock (distortions, lots of aural information), and Shape 3 is for more classical styles (very soft dither shape, use on very airy mixes).
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