#1
My guitar is a Jackson Dinky with a Floyd. I replaced the locking but with a different one because I wanted a handmade USA one. And something happened, The strings are in standard, but the first fret is the same pitch as the open. I don't know what happened and I've even tried adjusting the truss rod. Please help.
#2
It's most likely because the nut action is so low that the strings are actually resting on the 1st fret. This is something you should visibly see.

That being the case, you need to add shims under the locking nut to raise the action to the point that the open notes stop buzzing. You can purchase locking nut shims that do exactly this.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/like/391519454460?lpid=122&chn=ps&adgroupid=13585920426&rlsatarget=pla-142405570626&adtype=pla&poi=&googleloc=9041116&device=c&campaignid=207297426&crdt=0
Quote by Axelfox
Please understand how little we as a community care
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Oct 14, 2016,
#3
T00DEEPBLUE +1 dead on.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.


***"What Trashed Hoards"*** (updated 2016-11-27)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#4
T00DEEPBLUE Thank you for the response, it is definitely the nut height because I can see the bend of the string at the nut. Thanks for helping, thought the nut holes were shot.
#5
That doesn't make sense. The Jackson licensed nut is like "BH-43" or something like that. It is not as tall as an OFR nut is. You should be having the opposite issue.

What nut did you purchase? R3? Does this problem happen on all strings?

You can order the proper shims, I simply used a pair of scissors and a thin cardboard or card stock. Business card, cereal box, etc

Find/buy a set of feeler gauges that they make for spark plugs at a local hardware/auto store. Tuned up, a good ballpark measurement is .5mm measured from the top of the 1st feet to the bottom of the open string. Some people might prefer higher, some people go lower. Typically you can just adjust the nut "up" until the strings don't buzz on the frets and stop there. You have to have proper relief to use this method though.

Or just re-install the previous nut. As long as it clamps the strings there is no reason to change it.
#6
Quote by guitarkid8
That doesn't make sense. The Jackson licensed nut is like "BH-43" or something like that. It is not as tall as an OFR nut is. You should be having the opposite issue.

What nut did you purchase? R3? Does this problem happen on all strings?

You can order the proper shims, I simply used a pair of scissors and a thin cardboard or card stock. Business card, cereal box, etc

Find/buy a set of feeler gauges that they make for spark plugs at a local hardware/auto store. Tuned up, a good ballpark measurement is .5mm measured from the top of the 1st feet to the bottom of the open string. Some people might prefer higher, some people go lower. Typically you can just adjust the nut "up" until the strings don't buzz on the frets and stop there. You have to have proper relief to use this method though.

Or just re-install the previous nut. As long as it clamps the strings there is no reason to change it.


I kept the original Jackson locking nuts on my OFR conversions for this very reason the OFR nuts were considerably taller and I did not want to modify my headstock to accomodate it.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#7
Quote by Slayanddestroy
I wanted a handmade USA one.


Where do you find a "handmade" and "USA" nut? The only ones I've seen that carry those adjectives are the titanium nuts, and at that point, the question is, "why?"