#1
So, i got my first guitar with a floyd rose about 4 weeks ago. I lovee it, until the hoel the bar went into became loose. I went back to guitar center, and they said they could fix it because of a manufacturing error. So, i traded my guitar in for a jem jr. And now, less than a week after i traded it in, i have to re tighten the whole everyday by taking off the backplay and use an allen wrench to tighten the hole. Its a tedious process that takes about 10 minutes. Is theyre a way to prevent this from happening?
#3
Hmm. Loctite might do the trick, but I suspect that if your assembly is coming loose frequently, then you are into Herman Li-type whammy bar insanity, which takes its toll on the whammy bar and the bridge. it is not a problem for him, as he has a signature deal with Ibanez and gets free guitars and gear. But for us mere mortals, it can be a real issue.

Since you are dealing with mass-produced gear made of metal, the heat treatment of that metal is critical to its ability to hold up under stress. Since it is easier to machine (mill, cut, stamp, whatever) soft metal than hard metal, a lot of times the metal parts don't get the proper heat treatment. it sucks, but it is a fact of life. Taking it to a metal heat treatment firm is not usually an option, because they would need to know exactly what alloy was used in the parts in the first place before they could do a proper heat treatment. Most manufacturers don't publish that information.

First; try the Loctite. It may do the trick, and it is a cheap and easy fix. If not, and if you are determined to put heavy stress on your bridge, then your only hope might be to go to an aftermarket (read: expensive) replacement tremolo from people like Floyd Rose, Schaller, and Wilkinson. They tend to be of higher quality all around. They ain't cheap, though. And if you've got the cash...



Floyd Rose Titanium tremolo bridge. For US$900.00, it probably doesn't get much stronger than that!

Best of luck to you with this one.
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#4
That's what she said.

I use my wife's nail polish under the plastic bushings of my whammy bar. Takes a good 4 coats. Loctite is also good.

I had no idea there was a titanium FR but $900 is insane. Don't do that unless you are Mr. Money Bags Himself
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#5
Quote by FatalGear41
Since you are dealing with mass-produced gear made of metal, the heat treatment of that metal is critical to its ability to hold up under stress. Since it is easier to machine (mill, cut, stamp, whatever) soft metal than hard metal, a lot of times the metal parts don't get the proper heat treatment. it sucks, but it is a fact of life. Taking it to a metal heat treatment firm is not usually an option, because they would need to know exactly what alloy was used in the parts in the first place before they could do a proper heat treatment. Most manufacturers don't publish that information.


I highly doubt that there is metal to metal contact as that would be a poor design for reasons you stated.
More likely, there will be a 'sacrificial' bushing in there made of a softer material.
If the TS is going crazy on the whammy then this bushing is doing what it's meant to do and needs replacing (or opening up) more often to suit his/her playing style.