#1
So I'm new here to the forums and I have something that I need help with so for whoever reads this whole thing thank you also please excuse the grammatical and punctuation errors. So am an aspiring artist and I really need advice and information for these problems I have a sound and band type genre or whatever in my head I have been compiling so much information for the last year or so trying to figure out how to compose music and I can't get it all straight in my head and I don't know where to begin my main problem is I don't know what to use for rhythm guitar style playing like what chords and when to use them for certain things take dinosaur jr for example j mascis just plays chord progressions for the majority of his rhythm licks and riffs type stuff with a few flares here and there hammer ons pull offs slides etc HOW DO YOU DO THAT how do you come up with the chords out of the key your playing in and make them sound interesting??? Also the solos I don't know if it's arpeggios scales chords what these guys are doing or where to begin it comes down to WHAT DO I USE AND HOW DO I DO IT I understand playing in key major minor pentatonic diatonic relative keys chord progressions scales modes but HOW DO I APPLY THESE THINGS IS IT JUST JUST A MATTER OF MEMORIZING ALL OF IT AND MAKING UP SHIT WHILE REMAINING IN KEY OR IS THERE MORE TO IT THEN THAT??? PLEASE HELP.
#2
This is where knowledge of theory helps. Analyze what's happening in the songs that you like. If you hear a cool sound, figure out what it is. It would help if you posted some examples and maybe we could help you.

Another thing that helps is just the general knowledge of your instrument. Just play the guitar a lot and you'll get familiar with all the techniques and basic rhythm patterns and all that. Learn to play songs that you like, preferably by ear.

When it comes to composing, you don't need to think about theory or anything. Sound is the most important thing. Do you hear sounds in your head? Can you play the sounds that you hear in your head? If not, maybe try singing/humming it and record that and then try to figure out how to play it.

But if you can't figure out what you are hearing in your head, maybe the ideas you are hearing are more vague than you may think and you aren't hearing actual pitches or rhythms. If this is the case, what you need is ear training. Learning songs by ear is a good way of training your ears (maybe start with melodies that you can sing from your memory). Also, theory knowledge makes using your ears a lot easier because it's easier to memorize sounds if you have explanations for them.

What should you learn about theory? Learn about intervals, keys and chord functions.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Oct 16, 2016,
#3
Quote by NoahJbird
take dinosaur jr for example j mascis just plays chord progressions for the majority of his rhythm licks and riffs type stuff with a few flares here and there hammer ons pull offs slides etc HOW DO YOU DO THAT how do you come up with the chords out of the key your playing in and make them sound interesting???

1. Study some theory;
2. Learn to play other people's songs and steal the bits you like;
3. Experiment.

Actually, only #2 and #3 are necessary. That's how 99% of rock musicians, composers and improvisers learn their craft. #1 just helps you feel as if you understand what you're doing.
Quote by NoahJbird

Also the solos I don't know if it's arpeggios scales chords what these guys are doing or where to begin it comes down to WHAT DO I USE AND HOW DO I DO IT
See above. Listen and copy. It's a language, and you have to learn it by ear. (Using chord charts and tabs is OK, it's not cheating, but you need to judge everything by ear to check it's OK.)
Quote by NoahJbird

I understand playing in key major minor pentatonic diatonic relative keys chord progressions scales modes but HOW DO I APPLY THESE THINGS IS IT JUST JUST A MATTER OF MEMORIZING ALL OF IT AND MAKING UP SHIT WHILE REMAINING IN KEY OR IS THERE MORE TO IT THEN THAT??? PLEASE HELP.
Well, yes it's "a matter of memorising all of it and making up shit", but don't feel you have to remain in key. (Remaining in key is like learning to ride a bike with training wheels. Do it that way if you think you might fall over without them.)

There isn't really any more to it than that. A lot of people try to pretend there is. (Which is mainly because talking about music - trying to explain it in words - is difficult, and makes music seem more complicated than it is.)

If you know what you say know, you know plenty of theory already - in fact if you don't how to apply it you know too much. Forget it. Learn some songs, look for patterns, listen for effects you like, find out what they are, and copy them. (Oh, and learn your instrument: learn to how to find any chord you want, and any note, anywhere on the fretboard.)
There are common things you'll hear in lots of songs (standard chord sequences) - which will probably make you nod and say "ah yeah!", or just yawn (cliches); and there are more uncommon things you hear less often - these will stand out, and make you go "wow" or "wtf?", depending on how "out" or unexpected it is.

If you want, you may then choose to apply theory terms to those various sounds, if you can recognize them. You don't have to. It's just pinning labels on stuff. Theory doesn't explain anything, not really.
Last edited by jongtr at Oct 16, 2016,
#4
What I think jongtr's point is, is that theory knowledge is kind of useless if you don't understand how it applies in practice - if you can't recognize the concepts in actual music. I think the point of theory knowledge is to support your ear. It also kind of works as a "map".

This doesn't mean you should ignore theory, but it's more about the way you should learn about it. What matters most is using your ears. That makes everything about understanding what's happening in music much easier, because after all music is all about sound. Simply put, theory just gives names to sounds. And when you have a name for a sound, it is easier to memorize because language is mostly the way we make sense of things.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#5
NoahJbirdThe above answers nail it.

But I'm going to throw a massive fucking wall of text at you. I'm sorry I don't have time to edit so I don't know if it's well written but I hope it should give you some ideas on where to start with your ideas. There is so much more to say but depending on where you're at right now this could well already be far too much. Anyway read it, or don't, but it's written now

If you do go down the route of learning theory then it can be a way to help you structure what you're doing in a pragmatic and deliberate way. I would view these only as exercises but you might come up with some cool stuff that works.

The most elemental step for the aspiring songwriter (in my opinion) is to understand and practice keeping it very simple with the most complex thing you do a basic three chord trick.

A single chord can work but you have to find a way to create interest. Interest is usually created through contrast. With a single chord contrast is created through the use of starting sparse and increasing intensity either through the introduction of new instruments or maybe going from a simple quiet picking patter and building into a strum pattern. It's always good to end by returning to the beginning.

However, the easiest way to create contrast is by introducing a second chord. Often this is a chord a fifth away from your original chord. (To find this chord find the major chord whose root is five steps away (up or down) in the major scale from the first chord. For example if you were playing a D chord then you could look at your D major scale D E F G A B C D and go either five steps up from the D (counting the D as one) or five down from the D (counting D as one) this would give you A or G as good options. Knowing how to find these two chords is pretty important.) An example of this is Sublime's 'What I Got' The whole song is D-G. That's it D G D G D G over and over and over.

The second chord doesn't have to be the a fifth away though. The Violent Femmes song "Add It Up" is just two chords but it starts on B and goes down a whole step to a major bVII chord. (a bVII chord is a major chord that is a minor seventh interval away from the root it is one whole step (two frets) below the fist chord). 'Add It Up' starts on B and goes down to A briefly to break up the monotony of the B chord. That's the whole song B B A B repeat over and over.

Another way to create interest is to lead into a chord using a scale run. You might play something like a D - duh duh D - duh duh D - duh duh D - duh duh D A B C D - duh duh D - duh duh D (here the A B C# is a single note bassline run leading back into the D)

But not everything you write will be just two chords. It will most likely be the minority of songs. But it's good to get a handle on how to create something interesting with minimal input. If you can create interest with two chords then you are ready for more. If you can't create something interesting with two chords then you should possibly work on your rhythm chops with a metronome.

Don't hesitate to go there. Most of the single chord, or two chord stuff are what are called vamps where you just bang away on two chords to give an underlying harmony to lay something over the top. They don't have to stand alone but could work for sections of songs. Guns'n'Roses 'Patience' uses a two chord vamp D - G for the final section of the song. "I been walking the streets at night, just trying to get it right"...etc

Three chords could work the same way. Particularly when the three chords are diatonically one step away from each other. Usually this involves one or more minor chords since you don't find three major chords one step away from one another in a diatonic key. An example of what I'm talking about here would be to take a major key, we'll use G as an example. Then you go up a whole step to A then up another whole step to B. Since we are in the key of G major then our G chord will be G major. The A chord here will be Am (A minor) the reason is that A major contains a C# which isn't in the key of G while in an Am chord the C# is changed to a C which Is in the key of G major.
Key of G major = G A B C D E F# G
Am chord = A C E (all fit with the key of G major)

Similarly the B chord will also be a minor chord.
B major = B D# F# (note that D# isn't in G major)
B minor = B D F# (note that D is in the key of G major)

!!NOTE!! You don't have to stick to diatonic chords or notes - experiment. There are many examples of songs that use all major chords despite some of the notes not being diatonic to the key - or chords that aren't even built off a note in the key. It's all about how things sound, but the purpose of my post is to give you a few simple ideas to start with and use as a stable building block to branch out from.

So back to our three chord vamp. We had G - Am - Bm...so how do we get back to the G? One simple way is simply to go back down. Since we have gone up one step at a time we could simply go back down. G - Am - Bm - G -Am - Bm - Am - G...etc etc In fact if you do this over and over then you're playing Bob Dylan's 'I Shall Be Released' (which you might also sometimes find in the key of A = A - Bm - C#m - Bm - A...etc

However, the most common combination of three chords is the use of what are known as the primary chords. Remember before when we looked at how to find two chords a fifth away from the original chord? Well do that and use both of those new chords along with the original. These are your I IV V (one, four, five) chords and they are your primary chords.

Lets say you are playing around an A chord. Then to find your IV and V chords you take your A major scale - A B C# D E F# G# A - and you go up five steps from A and down five steps from A. (always counting A as one) Up five steps will get you to E. Down five steps from A (counting A as one of course) will get you D.

Note that to another way to get to these chords is by counting up by five to get E and count UP by four to get D. (A=1; B=2; C#=3; D=4; E=5...etc)

These three chords (I IV V in various keys) will support just about any major key melody. They are the most commonly used combination of chords used in western music and for good reason - they work!!! You can arrange them in any order and it will sound good. Go ahead and try!!!
I IV I V repeat - can be enough for an entire song
I I IV V repeat - can be enough for an entire song
I V IV I repeat - can be enough for an entire song

You don't have to play each one for a single bar but can build a repeating structure over 16 bars, or 8 bars, or 12 bars. The blues is an entire genre of music that is based on exactly this concept. The 12 bar blues is a good example. Here I will use vertical lines "|" to separate bars. | E | for example means one bar of E.

12 bar blues in A
| A | A | A | A |
| D | D | A | A |
| E | E | A | A |

So you can see that the I IV and V are arranged in the 12 bar blues in a way that is not just spread over two bars but over 12. There are many variations on the 12 bar blues and there are also 8 bar blues and 16 bar blues structures. However, they almost all use I IV V or variations (particularly dominant7 chords).

There are too many songs to even try to list that use these three chords. But you should definitely spend a good deal of time getting a feel for them in various keys and specifically the way they change the feel of the music in relation to each other.

Once you have done that you can really start to branch out. Using substitutions and variations can add interest to what might start as a simple I IV V structure.

But lets look at some four chord tricks.

Remember our three chord trick: I - I - IV - V (repeat)
One of the most common four chord tricks is to replace the second I chord with a vi chord. The vi chord is a minor chord built on the sixth major scale degree. To find this chord get your major scale and count up six then build a minor chord from that note. If we were in the key of E for example then our major scale would be - E F# G# A B C# D# E - to get our chords we:
  • E=1 So the I chord = E
  • E=1; F#=2; G#=3; A=4 so A is our IV chord
  • E=1; F#=2; G#=3; A=4; B=5 so B is our V chord
  • E=1; F#=2; G#=3; A=4; B=5; C#=6 so C#m is our vi chord


So in the key of E a I - vi - IV - V chord progression is E - C#m - A - B

The I chord and the vi chord share a very special relationship they are known as the relative major/minor chords. E major is the relative major of C#m and C#m is the relative minor of E major. This relationship goes deeper than just the chords but I won't go into full details right now. I will just show the relationships between these two chords.

The E major chord has the notes E G# B
The C#m has the notes C# E G#.
Note that these two chords have two of the same notes in them. They both have E and G#. The remaining note is only a whole step away from each other B- C#. Because of this the movement between these two chords is subtle. It's not enough to feel like we have ventured very far from that E sound but enough to create some variation from a straight E chord. This is known as diatonic chord substitution. This is when we use chords that are diatonic to the key and share two of the same notes to replace one of the chords in our progression to make it more interesting. But we'll get to that in a minute For now we'll keep looking at four chord tricks.

The four chord trick I just explained simply uses a: I - I - IV - V progression and replaces the second I chord with a vi chord instead. But these three chords (I IV V) are so strong together that you don't have to stick so close to home. You can actually replace that second I chord with just about ANY chord and it will still be viable. Thus we could describe our four chord trick as: I - ? - IV - V

In the Beatles song 'I'm So Tired' they do just that in the verses. The first eight chords of the verses in this song are as follows:

A - G#7 - D - E
A - F#m - D - E

A is the I chord. D is the IV and E the V.
F#m is easy, it's our vi chord. But the G#7 chord is not even diatonic. And yet because it sandwiched into that I ? IV V structure it just works.

You can try the same thing with lots of different three chord tricks to turn them into four chord tricks and see what happens.

I IV I V you could try I IV vi V and see what happens
I V I IV could result in I V vi V (which is another one of the most common progressions in pop music)

But what if you want something more than a two or four bar chord progression that repeats over and over? Well go back to your three primary chords and build something that works over a larger structure. When you get the placement of these three chord sounding good you can start to use substitutions to create some quite varied chord progressions. You can definitely do the same thing over two or four bars as well but if you find accurately changing between chords quickly a bit of a challenge, or if you just want a chord progression over a larger number of bars that is more than just a I IV V then use more bars .

We'll use a 12 bar blues as our starting point and apply some simple chord substitutions. I'm not going to go into jazzy chord subs because 1)that's not my area of expertise and 2) it would be more lengthy than it already is!!! I want to keep it relatively simple at this point.

So Diatonic chord substitution. You remember that our I and iv are related chords right? We called them relative major/minor. And you remember that part of the reason they are related has to do with the fact that they share two out of three notes. Well we can use these common chord tones to our advantage by substituting one chord for another when they share some of the same chord tones. The broad term for this type of substitution is called Common Tone Chord Subsitution. A specific type of common tone chord substitution is Diatonic Chord Substitution using Diatonic Chord Families.

The I chord is our tonic chord. It's the home chord in the key. If we are in the key of E then the I chord is E. It provides the most stable sound of all the chords in this key. The diatonic triads (three note chords made up of a root third and fifth) that share two notes with the I chord will sound most related to this chord and are said to be part of the tonic family of chords.

Key of E major = E F# G# A B C# D# E

In the key of E major our tonic chord is E major = E G# B
The vi we already know shares two notes in common with E major. In the key of E the vi chord is C#m. C#m = C# E G#
In the key of E major we have another chord that shares two notes with E major. It is the iii chord. The iii chord is the chord built on the third degree of the major scale. E=1; F#=2; G#=3. And it is a minor chord (how do I know? because at this time I just want to stick to the notes of the E major scale. And building a chord off that G# would mean we have to use a B instead of a B# since B# doesn't exist in the E major scale). So G# B D# is our G#m chord. It shares the G# and B with the E major chord and is generally part of the tonic family.

In the key of E major our IV chord is A major. A major = A C# E. You'll note that C#m shares two of the same chord tones as this chord. However C#m already has a very special relationship with the tonic chord. There is another chord that also shares two notes with the A major chord. The ii chord in E major is the F#m chord. It is made up of the notes F# A C#. It shares A and C# with the IV chord. These two chords are actually also relative major/minor to each other. They are both part of the Sub Dominant family. The term Sub Dominant refers to the IV chord of a key. Specifically it refers to the chord built of the scale degree a fifth BELOW the tonic, which as we know is for all intents and purposes the same as the scale degree a fourth above the tonic.

Finally we have the V chord. (this is known as the Dominant). The chord that is part of this family is the chord built off the seventh scale degree. In the key of E major the V chord is B. B major = B D# F#. The vii chord is a diminished chord and it uses the notes D# F# A. It shares the notes D# and F# with the B major chord. The vii is part of the dominant family.

You'll also note that the iii chord shares two of the same notes as the V chord. In the key of E major the iii chord is G#m = G# B D# and the V chord is B major = B# D F#. The iii chord is sometimes part of the dominant family, but because the I chord is a stronger chord it often gets used there instead. Context is everything!!!

So now that we have our diatonic chord families mapped out:
Tonic - I vi iii
Sub Dominant = IV ii
Dominant = V viidiminished (and sometimes iii)

So now we could write a chord progression just using the I IV and V chords to get our basic structure down. then we could use our diatonic chord families to introduce a little more variation without significantly altering or basic structure.

So we might decide hmmmm, you know what for the first eight bars I'm just going to have a tonic chord. But a tonic chord for eight bars gets really monotonous and I feel like I need something to break up that monotony. Well there are countless thing we could do to achieve this, but one of them is to use diatonic chord families. We might decide that every second bar will be a vi chord. So the first eight bars of our progression will essentially be a two chord vamp between the I and vi chord.

Let's use the key of C major now. key of C major = C D E F G A B C

The I chord is C the vi chord is Am

So our first eight bars might be...

| I | vi | I | vi | I | vi | I | vi | (or in the key of C = | C | Am | C | Am | C | Am | C | Am | )

our next four bars might be a mix of IV V

| IV | IV | V | V | (or in the key of C= | F | F | G | G | )
We might decide to break this up with a ii in place of the second IV chord as well as a vii diminished chord in place of the second V chord

| IV | ii | V | viidim | (or in the key of C= | F | Dm | G | Bdim | )

And all of a sudden our chord progression sounds quite different but has the same initial structure.

Initial structure:
C - C - C - C
C - C - C - C
F - F - G - G

After diatonic chord substation
C - Am - C - Am
C - Am - C - Am
F - Dm - G - Bdim

You could try the same thing with a four chord trick...

I - I - IV - V
might become:

I - vi - ii - V

Which leads us into a whole new area of chord progressions - the cycle of fifths and cycle of fourths!!!

Remember how the chords that were a fifth above and a fifth below our tonic always worked with the tonic? Well this "fifth" and "fourth" relationship is very powerful indeed.

If we look a that last chord progression I - vi - ii - V as a repetitive pattern then we would go back to our I chord after our V over and over again

Now that V - I move is strong. But look how we get to the V chord - from a ii chord. If we counted up five steps in the scale starting on the V then we would get to ii. Lets look at the key of C again.

C major scale = C D E F G A B C
C=1; D=2; E=3; F=4; G=5; etc.

C is our I chord. G is our V chord.

But staying in our key of C lets try counting up from G this time

C major scale = C D E F G A B C
G=1; A=2; B=3; C=4; D=5;

So Dm to G has a similar kind of effect to our G to C

And if we count up five from the D we get to A. A of course it the vi

So remember our progression
I - vi - ii - V - I
C - Am - Dm - G - C

It's almost like going by the same each time: a cycle of chord movements each chord a fifth above the following (except the initial I to vi).

This V-I and IV-I relationship has been very prominent in western music to create progressions that are diatonic and non diatonic alike but that focus on that down a fifth or down a fourth root movement.

If we think about the V-I relationship they are both major chords. So what happens then if instead of preceeding the V chord with a minor ii chord we preceed it with a major II chord?

D - G - C. That D to G is likea V-I in the key of G. But the G to C is like a V to I in the key of C. The C is where we ultimately end up so the G is the ultimate V chord. But the D is the V of the V chord!!! In fact it is often even written as such V/V which means V of V.

So what happens then if we approach that D chord by a chord that is a V above it? That would be an A major chord. And if we preceed that A with a chord that is a V above that? Then we have an E major chord.

Putting that all together we get E - A - D - G - C
Because of that strong V-I relationship these all work very well together. In fact you could go all the way around and end up with a progression 12 chords long that are all major chords.

Similarly the IV-I relationship is strong. This is effectively the same thing in reverse.

If we were in the key of E for example we would approach that E with a major chord that is a fourth above E, which is A major.
We would approach that A with a chord a fourth above it which is D major.
The major chord a fourth above D major is G major and a fourth above that is C major.

Our chords are then C - G - D - A - E which is the chord progression for 'Hey Joe'

It's pretty late here and I've been up for a long time, and typing for ages so it might not be very clear. I tried to explain things as I went but it's likely that much of this will go over your head if you don't have a basic grasp on theory - particularly major scales, and basic chord construction specifically building diatonic chords from scales. This is really just some very basic ideas in regard to coming up with chord progressions. It barely scratches the surface. And it is very prescriptive but in music you really need to follow your ear rather than your reason. You don't want to feel at any time like you have to do X Y and/or Z. You should feel free to do whatever the you want. However, these simple ideas are a very good foundation. If you play around with some of this stuff and really let it soak into your ears then hopefully this will give you a foundation.

And depending on what you want to achieve this could be all you need to write songs. There are many artists whose entire musical catalogues could be described with the ideas presented in this post. Though there is definitely so so much more to be explored. And the best part is that even with all the ideas and observations recorded and noted down you're still completely free to do whatever the hell you want with your chord progressions.

But when all is said and done. The best method is still to learn other songs and copy haha!! But as you do that you'll start to see a lot of these ideas everywhere
Si
#6
As usual 20T slaughters it.

Despite what the "I" word means, no one actually improvises with 0 advance prep --> Practice improvising = Get better at improvising.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#7
Sorry, but 20Tigers is really over-simplifying the whole thing. It's WAY more complicated than that. Essentially, if you don't know all that already, you may as well give up now. Go and study quantum physics, something easy...
#8
I have not idea how to take that last post. I know my post was way too long and could use some editing, but it was the basics. The problem is that there is so much more to say...I didn't touch on inversions, harmonizing melody, part writing, voice leading, direct chord subs, other common tone chord subs or a ton of other things.
Si
#9
It was most likely sarcasm lol.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#10
Quote by 20Tigers
I have not idea how to take that last post. I know my post was way too long and could use some editing, but it was the basics. The problem is that there is so much more to say...I didn't touch on inversions, harmonizing melody, part writing, voice leading, direct chord subs, other common tone chord subs or a ton of other things.
Sorry, yes it was sarcasm (the smiley was supposed to indicate that). Nothing wrong with any of it, it's just "basic" in the same way that chapter 1 (and maybe 2 as well) of a book on theory is "basic".
(Believe me, I know how hard it is to avoid screeds of text when trying to explain the "basics". I'm often just as guilty, and struggling to kick the habit )

But also I liked the OP's phrase "MEMORIZING ALL OF IT AND MAKING UP SHIT" - which I though summed up the whole process admirably.
Last edited by jongtr at Oct 20, 2016,
#11
Quote by jongtr
But also I liked the OP's phrase "MEMORIZING ALL OF IT AND MAKING UP SHIT" - which I though summed up the whole process admirably.

yeah, this is pretty much how improv looks both before you know how and after you know how. But it feels a hell of a lot more complicated while you're figuring it out.

Charlie Parker expressed the sentiment, which I'll paraphrase "You learn your scales and your theory and your tunes... and then you forget all that shit and just play"
Last edited by cdgraves at Oct 22, 2016,
#12
Quote by cdgraves
yeah, this is pretty much how improv looks both before you know how and after you know how. But it feels a hell of a lot more complicated while you're figuring it out.

Charlie Parker expressed the sentiment, which I'll paraphrase "You learn your scales and your theory and your tunes... and then you forget all that shit and just play"
Right - Charlie Parker was saying the exact same thing, in effect. Just because a process is easy to sum up doesn't mean it's simple or quick in practice. "Memorizing all of it" takes years, decades even.

But actually, you can improvise even when you know very little. You can "make up shit" first, when you've memorized hardly anything. Obviously it will be limited in scope, but the principle is simple. Even if you can only play a couple of chords on guitar, you can vary how you play them. If you can just play one simple riff, or twinkle twinkle, you can change how you play it. That's improvisation. Start with the right attitude and improvisation is never difficult. (That's been my experience anyhow.)
#13
Quote by NoahJbird
So I'm new here to the forums and I have something that I need help with so for whoever reads this whole thing thank you also please excuse the grammatical and punctuation errors. So am an aspiring artist and I really need advice and information for these problems I have a sound and band type genre or whatever in my head I have been compiling so much information for the last year or so trying to figure out how to compose music and I can't get it all straight in my head and I don't know where to begin my main problem is I don't know what to use for rhythm guitar style playing like what chords and when to use them for certain things take dinosaur jr for example j mascis just plays chord progressions for the majority of his rhythm licks and riffs type stuff with a few flares here and there hammer ons pull offs slides etc HOW DO YOU DO THAT how do you come up with the chords out of the key your playing in and make them sound interesting??? Also the solos I don't know if it's arpeggios scales chords what these guys are doing or where to begin it comes down to WHAT DO I USE AND HOW DO I DO IT I understand playing in key major minor pentatonic diatonic relative keys chord progressions scales modes but HOW DO I APPLY THESE THINGS IS IT JUST JUST A MATTER OF MEMORIZING ALL OF IT AND MAKING UP SHIT WHILE REMAINING IN KEY OR IS THERE MORE TO IT THEN THAT??? PLEASE HELP.


It all starts by learning some parts and solos. Then learn some theory to tie it together. Hendrix is the authority on chordal embellishments- so learn some of his songs.