#1
Hello All, I made a video which briefly summarises the basics of Jazz theory - from modes to the chord-scale system to available tensions and a few other things. Check it out if you're interested. Thanks

#2
Quote by BB666
from modes to the chord-scale system
Uh-oh...

(Sorry, I know I should watch before offering a critique... ... I'll get back to you...)
#3
Watched the whole video.

Here's some critique.

I think if somebody who doesn't have a general idea of these concepts decides to watch this video, they will not get much out of it. But I get that the point of it was just to briefly talk about the concepts and you have links to actual lessons in the video. I'm just not sure how helpful this video will be to somebody who doesn't know about this stuff already.

I didn't agree with the different "moods" the chords have because that mostly has to do with the context. Those moods may apply out of context and may help people with memorizing the sounds of different chord types, though.

I also don't agree with the CST's way of treating each chord as a different mode. If we are talking about functional harmony, talking about modes is a bit misleading. I do get why you would say "play D Dorian over Dm7", but that basically only applies out of context. Dm7-G7-Cmaj7 is ii-V-I in C major and unless you want to add some alterations, it makes sense to just treat it all as C major and not start thinking about different modes (because modes have nothing to do with it).

Also, just playing E and B is not going to sound like Cmaj7. You need some context (but you basically explained this later in your video).

There was a lot of good stuff too. I liked it when you started talking about context and how the chords before and after matter a lot. I also liked your explanation of keys.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

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#4
Quote by MaggaraMarine

I also don't agree with the CST's way of treating each chord as a different mode. If we are talking about functional harmony, talking about modes is a bit misleading. I do get why you would say "play D Dorian over Dm7", but that basically only applies out of context. Dm7-G7-Cmaj7 is ii-V-I in C major and unless you want to add some alterations, it makes sense to just treat it all as C major and not start thinking about different modes (because modes have nothing to do with it).

I didn't watch the video, but if TS did try to explain it like that.. :S

If I may add to what Maggara said, CST is really just the horizontal mapping of the pitches in a chord. Its function is to help organize and simplify what one should play while improvising so that we don't miss alterations etc. So as Maggara says, one should generalize into a key whenever possible. It's actually pointless to not to so.
#5
Quote by GoldenGuitar
I didn't watch the video, but if TS did try to explain it like that.. :S

If I may add to what Maggara said, CST is really just the horizontal mapping of the pitches in a chord. Its function is to help organize and simplify what one should play while improvising so that we don't miss alterations etc. So as Maggara says, one should generalize into a key whenever possible. It's actually pointless to not to so.

Well, it was not explained exactly like that in the video. But it was mentioned in the video at 24:26.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#6
+1 to Mags and GG (and Jon lol)

Looking at different chords in the same key as requiring different enharmonic "modes" is insanely counterproductive. CST (mostly) doesn't come into play until non-diatonic harmony starts showing up.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#7
Quote by GoldenGuitar

If I may add to what Maggara said, CST is really just the horizontal mapping of the pitches in a chord.
Yes - plus any extensions or alterations, of course.
Quote by GoldenGuitar

Its function is to help organize and simplify what one should play while improvising so that we don't miss alterations etc.
Well, any relevant alterations are usually indicated in the chord symbol. But then jazz does have certain shorthand conventions in chord symbols, where some alterations (and extensions) are implied and not stated. CST is of (some) use in those cases, I guess, but it hardly needs such a big concept. It certainly isn't a "theory".
IOW, an understanding of chord symbol terminology is all you really need (plus an overview of the context of a sequence).
Quote by GoldenGuitar

So as Maggara says, one should generalize into a key whenever possible. It's actually pointless to not to so.
Quite. Like JP says, CST becomes useful (but still not necessarily essential) when dealing with non-diatonic harmony - true "modal jazz", consisting of chords which can't be generalized into a key.

I'm only splitting hairs! We're all in agreement here. (I still haven't got round to watching the video though... )
Last edited by jongtr at Oct 18, 2016,
#8
jongtr
This thread atm is commentary on the commentary of the commentary. I love it when we do this.
#9
You didn't explain why you have to wear a turtleneck with a blazer over it. I still haven't come across a satisfactory theoretical explanation for that.
Quote by crownegamers
I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

Quote by dspellman
The guy wears a KFC Bucket and a white mask during performances, and you're interested in the color of his pickup covers?

#10
Quote by GoldenGuitar
jongtr
This thread atm is commentary on the commentary of the commentary. I love it when we do this.
No, I hate it...
#11
MaggaraMarine

He's not necessarily discussing CST there ... he did state around 24:26 that so long as the scale has the chord tones (though he was doing this by note names) then basically do what you like.

I don't like CST (as per Berklee) ... precisely because you can use whatever notes you like around the chord tones, and at that point, scales can fade into the background, and the concern instead is (delayed) resolution to the chord tones. Of course, the scales from CST will provide some possibilities, but ...
https://soundcloud.com/jerry-kramskoy-1