#1
Most colleagues and Friends will understand what I mean when I say I am a guitar repair man. My primary training was in construction restoration valuation and repair of electric and acoustic guitars. I was honored to serve a two-year apprenticeship under the tutelage of Dan Douglas, an absolutely brilliant and meticulous mentor. Like most repair shops in the late eighties our business was founded around the industry of guitar Construction. Our tools were mainly made by us and today you can see replicas of all of those tools inside the stewmac catalog. I've had a few guitar shops where we made custom guitars and did repairs, then I left that business and worked on cars for about 15 years or basically until I could stand it no more and at the age of 50 I decided to go back into production repair.
I had maintained a small customer base of about 20 players along the north shore of Lake Travis outside of Austin. This area is saturated with great guitar players and moist with regular guitar players, so over the years I kept my chops up. But I had decided to go back to work at a bench repairing guitars, and that's exactly what I did. I am the newest Hub guitar tech for Guitar Center in Austin Texas.
I've been there about a month now so I feel comfortable sharing my experience with the ultimate guitar community. So far it's awesome. The level of production that I'm seeing is crazy. Every kind of repair that you could imagine will come across my bench in the next year I promise. It has always been my personal commitment to never turn away any repair. That won't change. I am however and will continue to be up to my neck in production repairs. Gentlemen I'm not scared. I'm a grown man and a total badass. I'll post here regularly about this awesome adventure and of course answer any questions anyone might have about the dark side.
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.
#3
Always keep a dishwashing soap squeeze bottle of mixed mineral oil and Astroglide in the shower for stroking off. Today for the first time I tried removing the bottle cap and pressing the open end against the head of my prick and moving the bottle up and down. It created suction, and the sensation of the lubrication against the open end of my penis got me going. I could feel the sensation all the way to my prostrate. I also like to use a small wet-dry vacuum cleaner with a toy like a pocket pussy. The suction plus the stroking is one big cum and very little clean up.
2013 #5 Uger
2012 #7 Uger

Quote by jetfuel495
Jesus, Horsedick, you are my hero

Quote by JayT44
don't worry guys his girlfriend is black, she said it was okay for him to say that.



Stalk Me

Shitty Covers

Original Music

Lastfm
#4
I'm at least as excited as horsedick.
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.
#5
It's Horsedick.MPEG. Like A Tribe Called Quest; you say the whole thing: Horsedick.MPEG
2013 #5 Uger
2012 #7 Uger

Quote by jetfuel495
Jesus, Horsedick, you are my hero

Quote by JayT44
don't worry guys his girlfriend is black, she said it was okay for him to say that.



Stalk Me

Shitty Covers

Original Music

Lastfm
#6
Who is a more powerful dark side user?

Voldemort or Mirror Universe Spock?
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#7
Trick question. Spock is real.
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.
#9
Quote by Horsedick.MPEG
Always keep a dishwashing soap squeeze bottle of mixed mineral oil and Astroglide in the shower for stroking off. Today for the first time I tried removing the bottle cap and pressing the open end against the head of my prick and moving the bottle up and down. It created suction, and the sensation of the lubrication against the open end of my penis got me going. I could feel the sensation all the way to my prostrate. I also like to use a small wet-dry vacuum cleaner with a toy like a pocket pussy. The suction plus the stroking is one big cum and very little clean up.

But then all of your lube will be tainted with your spooge so you can no longer use it for the ladies unless you want some Babyhorsedick.MPEG's.

Or alternatively, the ladies just aren't your thing.
Quote by sashki
Did you make your own nut slotting files? All the ones I've seen for sale cost a trillion buckaroons and I'm looking for more affordable alternatives.

This is actually a good thing you should do, OP. Stewmac's slotting files are disgustingly expensive.

Make some and make your product known so other forumgoers will start recommending your product. Word of mouth among guitar forums is a marketing opportunity to take advantage of.
Quote by Axelfox
Please understand how little we as a community care
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Oct 16, 2016,
#10
Quote by austintechs
Most colleagues and Friends will understand what I mean when I say I am a guitar repair man. My primary training was in construction restoration valuation and repair of electric and acoustic guitars. I was honored to serve a two-year apprenticeship under the tutelage of Dan Douglas, an absolutely brilliant and meticulous mentor. Like most repair shops in the late eighties our business was founded around the industry of guitar Construction. Our tools were mainly made by us and today you can see replicas of all of those tools inside the stewmac catalog. I've had a few guitar shops where we made custom guitars and did repairs, then I left that business and worked on cars for about 15 years or basically until I could stand it no more and at the age of 50 I decided to go back into production repair.
I had maintained a small customer base of about 20 players along the north shore of Lake Travis outside of Austin. This area is saturated with great guitar players and moist with regular guitar players, so over the years I kept my chops up. But I had decided to go back to work at a bench repairing guitars, and that's exactly what I did. I am the newest Hub guitar tech for Guitar Center in Austin Texas.
I've been there about a month now so I feel comfortable sharing my experience with the ultimate guitar community. So far it's awesome. The level of production that I'm seeing is crazy. Every kind of repair that you could imagine will come across my bench in the next year I promise. It has always been my personal commitment to never turn away any repair. That won't change. I am however and will continue to be up to my neck in production repairs. Gentlemen I'm not scared. I'm a grown man and a total badass. I'll post here regularly about this awesome adventure and of course answer any questions anyone might have about the dark side.


That's pretty cool man, I'll hit you up if I ever have something I need worked on. You at the GC off of Mopac or the one at northcross?
Quote by Hal-Sephira

We all have the rights to be mad

So does you
#14
Thanks! I'm at Northcross brother. Busy store. Just now getting my first smoke break.
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.
#15
You should boldly go to the return/enter key to make line breaks since you clearly have never been there before. I mean you're maybe a nice guy and all but honestly when people see a wall of text like that they don't bother reading.

Still haven't read the OP
*your ad here*
Last edited by theogonia777 at Oct 17, 2016,
#16
Both of those replies are totally accurate!
But, it's been a long time since I really loved my job. I gotta keep up a good attitude to not be intimidated by this mountain of repairs.

Today's repairs:
Broken headstock on a hummingbird
Separated laminate on a mandolin
Split lower bout on a baby Taylor
5 or six setups

Fuck I hope I'm a badass!
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.
#17
Good for you dude. Ever thought of opening up your own place?
Quote by JD Close
Piano dick had some good parts, but should have said "As the business man slowly gets boned", would have accented the whole dick feeling of the album
#18
theogonia777
Actually, it is the first time I've ever done this and after reading back over I see that you're totally right. Without indents, it looks like a big solid wall of words! I'll indent or double carage return next time. Thanks for the advice!
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.
#19
Most_Triumphant
Yea, I opened a couple a few years back both attached to busy music stores. I found that the only way to survive was a high traffic environment like that. GC is off the chain in that regard.

But yea, my own place is my ultimate goal, and i guess now I'm on track to make that happen.
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.
#20
Diamond Dave
You're right Diamond Dave, I need to start posting pics. I don't think I'll need a release or anything, but I should ask my customers if it's cool to post pics of their instruments. I'll start asking tomorrow. Thanks.
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.
#21
sashkisashki
That's a great question. As you probably know, toolmaking is huge part of guitar repair, and even though specialty repair tools are getting easier to find, fabricating tools and jigs is still a very important part of what we do. Some tools, however, have always been a purchased item and either re-purposed or modified for our specific needs. Guaged slotting files are one of those tools that are not easily made so most guys end up buying them.

TOODEEPBLUE is very correct though. StewMac makes and sells good tools, but they are obscenely expensive.
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.
#22
I was jibing that you work with six strings whilr I work with 220 (unless it's a Bosendorfer Imperial, or a god-forsaken Stuart and Sons or any other extended range piano)

I do actually have a friend in Houston and I'll probably bring you something to fix when I visit her becaise you sound like you more than know what you're doing
#23
Pastafarian96thanks Pastafarian96. Your profile looks super interesting. Although I'm not much into the clavier, I'm not ill tempered toward it. Besides, the polyphonic should stick together.
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.
#24
Quote by Pastafarian96
Bah, guitar tech


I saw an add for inexperienced piano repairmen...I was very tempted but I dont want to quit a job I searched for a while.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#25
Quote by austintechs
Pastafarian96thanks Pastafarian96. Your profile looks super interesting. Although I'm not much into the clavier, I'm not ill tempered toward it. Besides, the polyphonic should stick together.

I approve of the clavier joke greatly
#26
Quote by Guitar0player
I saw an add for inexperienced piano repairmen...I was very tempted but I dont want to quit a job I searched for a while.

You made the right decision
It really isn't a job you go head first into at all
#27
Quote by Pastafarian96
You made the right decision
It really isn't a job you go head first into at all


Does the same apply for being a guitar tech?
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#29
This is a good place for me to take a minute and discuss repair evaluation and the quality standards in this industry.

Recenfly, a colleague told me that he was trained by a guy who told him that "sometimes good enough is good enough." When I heard that I was literally offended. I didn't feel like I had the time in such a short day for the long time it would take to explain why the concept of "good enough " was the antithesis of "repaired". I will, however, have to explain it and I'm quite nervous about jeopardizing my job. I'll explain myself here, and maybe that will help with my explaining it to him. Also I feel that every consumer should understand this philosophy as it applies to any repair whether it's automobile repair or guitar repair.

As a repairman, my very first duty to the customer is to fix their guitar. I know this sounds very simplistic and obvious but I assure you that it's a stringent commitment and one that oftentimes is resisted by customers and repairmen alike. The reason is simple: repairs are often costly and time-consuming.

In an attempt to lower the price or add convenience to retain the customer or job, the repairman will often offer quick fixes or shortcuts just to get the guy back on the road. While thinking he's doing the guy a favor, exactly the opposite is true. The quick fix is a solution usually intended to mitigate a problem that is actually a symptom of something else. That's why it's called a quick fix. It actually implies that the proper fix will take longer which it probably will. Some examples are: filling a nut slot with dust and super glue, gluing the ends of a fret that lifted, shimming a nut or a saddle, etc. These types of repairs are totally ok on our own guitars, but should be avoided at all cost when repairing a customer's instrument. These repairs all have one thing in common, they are all TEMPORARY fixes.

Temporary fixes by nature will fail eventually. When they fail, the customer will not remember how you explained that it was only temporary. The customer will not remember that at the time, a temporary repair was all he or she could afford. They will not recall how you did them a favor and bent over backward to get them to the stage. The customer will only remember that you were supposed to fix it and now it's broken. They will take it to another shop and the repair guy there will explain to them, in detail, how you screwed them over by performing a shotty repair.

It is not my job to save the customer money. It is my job to fix their instrument. No amount of money large or small will change the fact that they brought you their guitar to repair and now it's broken in the exact same place again. It's your fault and you will fix it again (correctly this time) for free.

One note: if a crappy repar is unavoidable, a good repair guy will NEVER charge for a temporary repair.
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.
#30
Quote by Pastafarian96
Probably
You're still aiming for tolerances that you won't see for several years before you get good


That's very well said.
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.
#31
austintechs
The problem we have in the piano industry regarding this is that 1. Pianos are far more complex instruments, mostly in their mechanics, and 2. Very few people see the workings of a piano, the total opposite of most of a guitar's workings. Combining these, sometimes it makes it hard to explain to a customer why they need to pay me an extra $30 because I replaced a string I didn't break (time consumpting and highly necessary) or why they should have the actual instrument tuned to 440Hz instead of flat at 430Hz (fight me guitarists) so that they can play at pitch and will need me to come back in a month or two twice to ensure that it stays at 440Hz instead of dropping seriously out of tune or any other regular procedure to ensure a correctly functioning instrument.

And yes, quick fixes are rarely charged for, with the exception of tunings, because there are very few cases where a quick fix is a good idea when you have 220+ strings that are tuned to each other and the piano, not a tuning program or machine as they do not allow for the uniqueness of each individual piano
#32
If you work as a piano tuner you better get paid doe that hassle. How many strings are there per note?

And honestly I'd love working as a guitar tech, i love tinkering.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#33
GC provides two distinct work areas. One area is on the retail floor space. For mine, this area is centralized and highly visible. We have two benches in this area and this area is where the technicians are expected to spend the majority of the time.

The other area is referred to as the Dirty Room. I originally thought they called it that because that's where you get dirty. No. Turns out they call it that because the room is actually dirty. In fact, they should call it the freekin Filthy Room.
Attachments:
shopbefore.pdf
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.
Last edited by austintechs at Oct 23, 2016,
#34
How does one post an image?
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.
Last edited by austintechs at Oct 23, 2016,
#35
Quote by Guitar0player
If you work as a piano tuner you better get paid doe that hassle. How many strings are there per note?

And honestly I'd love working as a guitar tech, i love tinkering.

On most grands there are about 8 monocords, the bicords run to about a third of the keyboard, maybe a bit more and the rest are all tricords (one string, two string, three string respectively)

Quote by austintechs
How does one post an image?

You have to upload it to an image sharing site like tinypic or imgur and post a link
I miss the days of just attaching things
#36
Guitar0playerIts the best seriously. And working someplace this awesome with such a diversity of repairs is super great.
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.
#38
Holy fuck this is hard. Corporate policies make doing this almost impossible. I can only touch guitars 30 hours a week.
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.
#39
Quote by austintechs
Holy fuck this is hard. Corporate policies make doing this almost impossible. I can only touch guitars 30 hours a week.
The job my sister does is kind of similar.

She's a bulk analyst(basically finds asbestos in samples of building materials). Each sample has a point value, depending on what it's from - soil, air, textured coating etc - and they're only allowed to do a certain number of points worth of samples per day. Samples are determined to be negative after a set amount of time being examined under a phase contrast microscope, with no fibres found.

As the reports are (mostly) qualitative rather than quantitative, a positive ID can be made in under a minute, which means analysts can go through their daily allocation of points - and do the necessary paperwork - long before lunch, if they happen to be 'lucky' and get everything easily identifiable.

And, for extra fun, it's law, not corporate policy.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#40
Quote by slapsymcdougal
The job my sister does is kind of similar.

She's a bulk analyst(basically finds asbestos in samples of building materials). Each sample has a point value, depending on what it's from - soil, air, textured coating etc - and they're only allowed to do a certain number of points worth of samples per day. Samples are determined to be negative after a set amount of time being examined under a phase contrast microscope, with no fibres found.

As the reports are (mostly) qualitative rather than quantitative, a positive ID can be made in under a minute, which means analysts can go through their daily allocation of points - and do the necessary paperwork - long before lunch, if they happen to be 'lucky' and get everything easily identifiable.

And, for extra fun, it's law, not corporate policy.


Yea, it's just like that.
When guitars are outlawed, only Outlaws will play guitar.