#1
My strings rust so quickly! Its ridiculous. Even on high quality Elixir 9-42's i find they rust and go out of tune at the 12th fret very quickly. Ive check, and theres nothing wrong with my intonation with freshies, but after 2 weeks-4 weeks, there are nearly a semitone out at the 12th. Help!?
Last edited by jcdurpidaedric at Oct 19, 2016,
#2
I don't understand how rusty strings would cause you to go out of tune specifically at the 12th fret. My suspicion is that you live in a very humid climate which causes 2 things: 1.) your strings rust faster (wiping them down after every play session helps. Your sweat causes most of the rusting). And 2.) your truss rod gets out of whack after a while due to the tension of the strings. Basically when you put fresh ones on, your truss rod is going back to the normal position, but after 2 weeks of string tension, your truss rod gets out of whack.
#3
Quote by Sayonara6String
I don't understand how rusty strings would cause you to go out of tune specifically at the 12th fret.

He doesn't mean that the strings are only out of tune at the 12th fret specifically, he's just using the 12th fret as a point of reference to describe the fact that the intonation goes out. I don't know exactly how or why this happens, but it does happen with rusty strings, the intonation gets flatter and flatter the more worn and rusted up they get.

jcdurpidaedric Do you live near the coast? vapors from the salt water in the air can be a nightmare for making things rust really quickly. If so I'm not sure what to suggest other than maybe getting a dehumidifier for the room you're storing your guitar(s) in.

Otherwise, Wiping the strings down after playing is a tried and tested method of preventing corrosion from building up on the strings while you're not playing them, and using some kind of string cleaner/lubricant after playing, like Fast Fret, should help too... but some people just have very corrosive sweat and there's not really a lot that can be done to stop the strings from wearing out really quickly while you're playing your guitar in that case.
Happiness is a warm Vox AC30
#4
Quote by jcdurpidaedric
My strings rust so quickly! Its ridiculous. Even on high quality Elixir 9-42's i find they rust and go out of tune at the 12th fret very quickly. Ive check, and theres nothing wrong with my intonation with freshies, but after 2 weeks-4 weeks, there are nearly a semitone out at the 12th. Help!?


There can be a lot of reasons for strings rusting quickly.

Your location can be one (if you live on Malta, for example, forget about anything metal ever lasting), with salt spray or acid air corroding things.
If you're not wiping down your strings (with a *clean* rag or towel) after every session, your strings may rust earlier.
If your body chemistry produces corrosive sweat, your strings may rust earlier.
If you leave your guitar out on a stand or hanger, your strings may rust earlier.
Unplug your guitar if you DO leave it out on a stand or hanger.

You can reduce string corrosion several ways:
Wipe them down after use. Some folks use alcohol or naptha to clean the strings, but be careful of using anything solvent-based around nitrocellulose finishes.
Put the guitar back in the case when you're not playing
Put a long piece of plastic between the strings and the frets if your case "clamps down" on the strings. This prevents electric currents from being generated by contact with the frets.
Add a VCI emitter to your case. VCI - Vapor Corrosion Inhibitor. This is NOT a "drying" gel pack. This is what NASA and gun collectors use to prevent corrosion on stored parts and blued guns. It's absolutely harmless to finishes on either, but it lays down a coating a few molecules thick (no, you won't see it or feel it) that helps prevent corrosion. You need to have the case closed in order for this to work properly. Replace it about once a year. Not expensive; these run $8 or so. Several kinds out there.
#5
dspellman
Quote by dspellman
There can be a lot of reasons for strings rusting quickly.

Your location can be one (if you live on Malta, for example, forget about anything metal ever lasting), with salt spray or acid air corroding things.
If you're not wiping down your strings (with a *clean* rag or towel) after every session, your strings may rust earlier.
If your body chemistry produces corrosive sweat, your strings may rust earlier.
If you leave your guitar out on a stand or hanger, your strings may rust earlier.
Unplug your guitar if you DO leave it out on a stand or hanger.

You can reduce string corrosion several ways:
Wipe them down after use. Some folks use alcohol or naptha to clean the strings, but be careful of using anything solvent-based around nitrocellulose finishes.
Put the guitar back in the case when you're not playing
Put a long piece of plastic between the strings and the frets if your case "clamps down" on the strings. This prevents electric currents from being generated by contact with the frets.
Add a VCI emitter to your case. VCI - Vapor Corrosion Inhibitor. This is NOT a "drying" gel pack. This is what NASA and gun collectors use to prevent corrosion on stored parts and blued guns. It's absolutely harmless to finishes on either, but it lays down a coating a few molecules thick (no, you won't see it or feel it) that helps prevent corrosion. You need to have the case closed in order for this to work properly. Replace it about once a year. Not expensive; these run $8 or so. Several kinds out there.


I think ive got incredibly corrosive sweat, as I wipe my strings down and don't live near the coast. Quite odd! Thanks for the tips everyone!