#1
Maybe I'm overlooking a certain key but can someone point me in the right direction? I dont have a talkbox so I'm going to try and go nuts with my cry baby.

Thanks.
#2
Figure out the chords, find which of the chords sounds like "home". That's your key. Chord tones will also give you a good idea of which notes will work over the song.

BTW, there is one "out of key" chord so you may need to make some alterations if you are going to use the key scale. My advice is, figure out the key, use notes in the key scale and chord tones. Also, use your ears.

You could also just play the original solo and use a wah wah. I think that would sound close enough. Or compose your own solo. Forget about scales, just come up with melodies in your head that sound good over it. Record yourself humming/singing those melodies and figure out how to play them on your guitar. This way you will also most likely avoid playing generic guitar licks. A guitar solo doesn't always need to be improvised/100% spontaneous.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Oct 21, 2016,
#3
Playing the song through in my head... it's pretty much just diatonic chords with a descending bass line, and then a minor iv at the end of each line. The chords mostly spell out a plain old major key, and the minor iv uses the parallel minor, but be sure to follow the chord tones rather than just playing a scale.
#4
^IIRC its a bVImaj7, not a IVm. And sometimes they do a bVII "hit" on the way back up.

D - Dmaj7/C# - Bm7 - Bbmaj7 - (Cmaj7) x a billion

If not you should solo over that . More interesting.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#6
I know the chords and Im not smart enough to understand what you guys are saying.
Im guessing a D?
#7
Yes. Pretty much all of Frampton's solo is in D major / D maj pentatonic.

You might need to adjust some notes over the Bb and C chords, but IIRC that's too much work for Frampton, so whatever
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#8
bVI ... iv... same key borrow

But bVI in a major key is a pretty standard move, so you'd do best to switch to Dm for that chord. It's called key borrowing, and it's very normal to borrow chords from the parallel minor. That means if you're in D major, using chords from D minor, as this song does.
Last edited by cdgraves at Oct 24, 2016,
#9
The key is D major, but the Bb is not "in the key" (I mean, it uses notes outside of the D major scale). This means you may need to change some of the notes in the D major scale when you play over that chord. Bb major has Bb, D and F in it, so you may not want to play an F# or a B natural over it (well, everything is possible, but it will most likely not sound that great, especially if you put emphasis on those notes).

So use the D major scale and alter it to fit the "out of key" chords. D major pentatonic will most likely sound just fine over everything, even though it clashes a bit with the Bb major chord.

But in the future if you want to figure out which notes will work over a chord progression, just find the key (by listening and finding the chord that sounds like "home"). Then look at the notes in the key scale (if the home chord is D major, you are in the key of D major and you should look at the notes in the D major scale) and look at the notes in the chords. Are all of the chord tones also in the key scale? If yes, you don't need to worry about anything. Just use the notes in the key scale and use your ears. But if there are some "out of key" chords (like Bb major in the key of D major), just alter the key scale to fit the chords. As I said, Bb major has Bb and F that are not part of the D major scale, so over that chord you may want to change the B natural to a Bb and the F# to an F natural, or just avoid playing those notes.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115