#1
Hey everyone, I'm getting married and moving to the dry, dry land of Utah and had a few questions I was hoping to get answered about moving equipment the smart way.

First off: a room humidifier. Oregon hasn't been arid, but my fiancé assures me that all of our guitars will need humidifying due to the dryness of the area. Basic research leads me to believe that our small collection's needs could be met with a room humidifier.

Any complaints against this one? Seems easy and nice... https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00JP6HQBG/ref=psdcmw_7031378011_t1_B001FWXKTA

Second: moving a Fender tube amp across a few states. How do I do it? Remove the tubes? Lay it flat? Keep it upright? It has a basic cover and will be secured in a safe spot on the truck. Any advice there?

Third: Any other advice? Most of our guitars have hard shells... should I remove any pressure from the necks? Drop tune a step for the ride?

Thanks everyone.
Try adding more delay.
#3
for the amp, i would pull the tubes and lay it flat so the speaker points up.

the speaker goes through better stress with bumping if it follows the suspension of the speaker.

the guitar, i have no idea.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

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youre just being a jerk man.


***"What Trashed Hoards"*** (updated 2016-11-27)
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#4
Those are great suggestions. Is it true you're not supposed to touch the tubes? Use a cloth and take them out? Wrap them safe?
Try adding more delay.
#5
Quote by telecastrmastr
Those are great suggestions. Is it true you're not supposed to touch the tubes? Use a cloth and take them out? Wrap them safe?


you can touch them. not when hot though. ouch! lol.

the only thing that is good not to do with tubes is to move or jostle them while they are hot (obviously not in this case) but i usually try to wait a few minutes between powering the amp off and moving it (just in general), that can shorten the life of a tube.

i just pull them and wrap them in a rag or towel then pack them back in the back of the inside of the amp with more padding. never had a problem.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.


***"What Trashed Hoards"*** (updated 2016-11-27)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#6
Quote by telecastrmastr
Those are great suggestions. Is it true you're not supposed to touch the tubes? Use a cloth and take them out? Wrap them safe?


It's better not to get finger grease on the tubes. It can produce a weak spot over time. If you dig out the old manuals that accompanied tubes back when they were manufactured in the US, you'll find this is pretty consistently stated. Nothing comes with Soviet bloc or Chinese tubes.
#7
Quote by telecastrmastr
Hey everyone, I'm getting married and moving to the dry, dry land of Utah and had a few questions I was hoping to get answered about moving equipment the smart way.

First off: a room humidifier. Oregon hasn't been arid, but my fiancé assures me that all of our guitars will need humidifying due to the dryness of the area. Basic research leads me to believe that our small collection's needs could be met with a room humidifier.

Third: Any other advice? Most of our guitars have hard shells... should I remove any pressure from the necks? Drop tune a step for the ride?



Your fiance is a wise woman. A room humidifier, if robust enough, will probably do. In the long run, you're going to want something that goes with the central heat/air. Wait until your furniture begins to crack .

Here's the thing with hard shell cases. The string tension doesn't matter. What does matter is supporting the headstock and keeping the body of the guitar from moving around. Put some packing around the body to keep it tight. Three things happen to guitars that are shipped in hard cases. The headstocks break, the necks separate from the bodies, and the strings grind into the frets. Put a long piece of plastic -- thick enough to prevent grinding -- between the frets and the strings (this is also a good idea if you're storing guitars for a long time in their cases -- it helps eliminate weak electrical currents that will corrode your frets). ESP ships their new guitars this way, and you can actually buy pieces specifically designed for this on eBay, etc.




Make sure that the top of the headstock can't contact the end of the case or the bottom of the case. For years, Gibson owners wondered why their Les Paul headstocks broke until they realized that the back of the headstock (thanks to that tiltback) touched the bottom of the case. Case goes over, headstocks break. Ibanez Artist (AR300, etc.) guitars have very heavy bodies and (often) badly glued neck-body joins. If the neck is securely held with two cradles and pressure from the top of the case, but the body of the guitar has play, the neck will separate from the body.

And if you have a jackson-style "tilted pointy" headstock and the guitar is free to move lengthwise in the case (styrofoam "padding" won't prevent this) and the case is allowed to ride on its "head," the result will be a nice headstock break between the first and second tuners. After an LP headstock break, it's the second-most-seen headstock break. A bit of careful packing INSIDE the case will prevent surprises when you get to your destination.

Last edited by dspellman at Oct 22, 2016,
#8
dspellman Our furniture will be okay... because we don't own any. (;

My LP has a very fitted case, so I think it'll be okay, but that's some great advice for transporting our acoustics. I'll have to screen cap those suggestions.

I also had a great laugh about the headstock breaking with the Floyd rose... you still have time to play it one last time with all 6 strings! (;

What would you call Jose plastic ESP slips so I can search them out? I LOVE that idea.

Thanks all for the tube advise too. I'll be sure to handle them with care when they're cool.
Try adding more delay.
#9
I wouldn't worry about the tubes being touched. common sense tells you not to do it with nasty greasy hands. if you were to handle the tubes 20 times that is a different story, but just to pull them once or twice to take them in and out it isn't a factor.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.


***"What Trashed Hoards"*** (updated 2016-11-27)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#10
You can use a piece of cardboard between strings and neck if you want to.

If you're worried about traveling with it, pack it in the case with wadded up newspaper behind and on top so it's held in place well. Towels might work too, make sure it's a snug fit, that's the way a lot of pro musicians put guitars on planes.

For the amp, do as Trashed said, transport it face up or face down. I b=never pull my tubes but you can, it won't hurt. If you're worried about finger grease, wipe it down with a cloth before plugging it back in. Tubes can be transported in a plastic bag, rolled inside washcloths. I made a case to carry my spares, with some foam rubber on top and bottom, and slots cut in the foam with an exacto knife. I found a light metal case at a yard sale for a buck, fitted some foam rubber in and I'm good to go. a tackle box might work too, same way, just cut some foam strips the right size to fit the individual drawers, one on top, one on bottom, tube between..

I always carry my amps laying down, so the speaker travels the same direction it does when in use. if you transport it standing up, the speaker bounces up and down, against the voice coil housing, and can scratch it. I've carried my 1967 Kustom 2x12 cabinet around all over Texas and Louisiana for 25 years, and a trip from Louisiana to Baltimore and back, speakers I installed in 1990 are still working perfect. I always carry it laying down. 1973 Fender Super Reverb, been hauled all over Louisiana for 15 years, Texas the past 4 years, same thing. A lot of it was in a bumpy ass trailer. Always laying down...I've seen people haul guitar/bass/PA speakers that didn't last half that long, always standing up.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...