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#1
For the last three years I've been saving up. The goal is that on my 30th birthday I'll buy an electric guitar (if I have enough money saved up.) That's seven months away. So I need to start narrowing it down. That's where you come in. I need the do's and don'ts.

Now, I've been drooling at the Gibson Les Paul 60's tribute. Yes, I know, I know, I'm unsure whether it's sacrilege. For someone who truly loves and respects the 60s (and 70's) I can't decide whether that guitar is actually cool or the equivalent of wearing bell bottoms and a curly wig with a band in it for Halloween.
Is it tacky? Or is it a good guitar?
What are some other choices within that price range? (Around $ 1000)

https://www.gibson.com/Products/Electric-Guitars/2016/USA/Les-Paul-60s-Tribute.aspx
#2
Anyone who has been saving for three years commands a little respect, and I'm really sorry if this is raining on your parade, but how are you planning on amplifying it? The reason I ask is because I spent decades mucking about with more or less expensive guitars and cheap amps, without getting any satisfaction at all. It wasn't until I got a decent amp (a Peavey Classic 30 in my case) that I finally connected with electric guitars.

My musically formative years were the mid-60s, and if I had a decent amp, I could be happy with that guitar (it has P90s and it isn't too flashy), though I prefer slab bodies and paint myself - I have an oldish LP Special.
#3
Personally, I wouldn't drop $1,000 on a first guitar. I get paid to play guitar and I spent less than that on my primary instrument. If you're a lover of the 60s blues-rock sound, you can get a perfectly good Epiphone Les Paul for $500-600, or an Epiphone SG for even less, and still have money left over for an decent amp (without which your new guitar will sound more or less like a kitchen table with strings on it).
Death to Ovation haters!
Last edited by PatchworkMan at Oct 22, 2016,
#4
Quote by Tony Done
Anyone who has been saving for three years commands a little respect, and I'm really sorry if this is raining on your parade, but how are you planning on amplifying it? The reason I ask is because I spent decades mucking about with more or less expensive guitars and cheap amps, without getting any satisfaction at all. It wasn't until I got a decent amp (a Peavey Classic 30 in my case) that I finally connected with electric guitars.

My musically formative years were the mid-60s, and if I had a decent amp, I could be happy with that guitar (it has P90s and it isn't too flashy), though I prefer slab bodies and paint myself - I have an oldish LP Special.


You're not raining on anything, this is why I'm asking. I'm aware of the cost of an amp, but surely no great amp can make a really bad guitar sound good either?


Quote by PatchworkMan
Personally, I wouldn't drop $1,000 on a first guitar. I get paid to play guitar and I spent less than that on my primary instrument. If you're a lover of the 60s blues-rock sound, you can get a perfectly good Epiphone Les Paul for $500-600, or an Epiphone SG for even less, and still have money left over for an decent amp (without which your new guitar will sound more or less like a kitchen table with strings on it).


Great. I'm not looking to spend a lot of money if I can avoid it, not with my income. If you're saying an Epiphone does the job, then I'll start looking at epiphone. Sure, the 60's tribute looks damn good, but a "Epiphone Les Paul Standard PlusTop Pro Bourbon Burst" doesnt look too tacky. It doesn't need to lock like a million bucks, especially with my bad technique and the fact I'm only playing for myself anyway.

I'm a novice at electric. Never even touched an electric guitar. But if you're saying the Epiphone does the same job, then that's a pretty sweet deal.

So, what kind of amp should I look at then?
#5
AnrBjotk how serious are you you planning on practicing. My personal theory is do some research and buy what you want, because, at least in my case, I'm going to wind up spending more in the long run and buying it anyway, because I won't be satisfied. I see alot good advice in here, but you have to think what will work best for you.
Last edited by kramer242 at Nov 3, 2016,
#6
Ok sounds like some more research is in order. I will cut in that used LP studios can be a good bargain too, or just a used Epiphone (get a higher-end model, not their Standard models). What gives you tone at the instrument level is the amp first and pickups second, with of course your playing being what makes it sound good musically or not. Focus your search on the right (used) amp and on a guitar that sits well with you. Realize in a few years you will probably end up wanting to trade your guitar for something else since you will later know more about what you want specifically in a guitar, hence me really recommending to stay lower budget. If you buy used, you can sell it for roughly the same amount later as long as you don't abuse it
We're just a battery for hire with the guitar fire
Ready and aimed at you
Pick up your balls and load up your cannon
For a twenty one gun salute
For those about to rock, FIRE!
We salute you
#7
Quote by 21GunSalute
Ok sounds like some more research is in order. I will cut in that used LP studios can be a good bargain too, or just a used Epiphone (get a higher-end model, not their Standard models). What gives you tone at the instrument level is the amp first and pickups second, with of course your playing being what makes it sound good musically or not. Focus your search on the right (used) amp and on a guitar that sits well with you. Realize in a few years you will probably end up wanting to trade your guitar for something else since you will later know more about what you want specifically in a guitar, hence me really recommending to stay lower budget. If you buy used, you can sell it for roughly the same amount later as long as you don't abuse it


Now things got confusing...
I wasn't aware that there were "useable" (from pro guitar players view) electric guitar below $1200. Now that I do, that seems a good option for my own non-pro (yet very serious) needs. Then again, since my needs are non-pro, and since my budget is limited, buying the wrong guitar is pretty detrimental. Most likely, with the wrong buy, I'll end up just not playing.. I'm currently looking at a used "Epiphone Les Paul STD Plustop Pro - HB" for $485. Would y'all call that a good buy?

And what is the price of a good amp, used and new? When I look at local guitar shop websites the prices vary from 1200 to 200; the cheap ones being small ones. And I don't even know how bad a small one is... Keeping in mind I'm not playing the Bowery Ballroom here, just the living room in my own apartment (most likely with earphones half the time), how cheap can I go without wasting money?
#8
Quote by AnrBjotk
You're not raining on anything, this is why I'm asking. I'm aware of the cost of an amp, but surely no great amp can make a really bad guitar sound good either?


actually unless the guitar really is terrible (broken, won't stay in tune, etc.) then a good amp actually probably will make a mediocre guitar sound good.

it's a bit academic since i'd never really suggest running a super-cheap guitar into a super-expensive amp, but assuming you're not talking about unrealistic extremes like that, then yeah.

that's not to say a better guitar won't sound better into the same amp, of course.
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#9
Electric guitars have come a long way. In the used market, as low as $200 USD or so can get you something playable.

An electric is IMO simply a combination of variables.

Straight neck
Properly installed level frets
Properly cut nut
Proper neck relief
Proper bridge action
Ability to intonate

Of course, the above are subject to personal adjustment. The rest comes down to preference of the body shape, neck profile, hardware, and layout.

You get what you pay for, but you can get a whole lot in the used market these days. The law of diminishing returns is very prevalent in the electric guitar market.

A no name Chinese guitar going into a JCM will sound much better than an original '59 Les Paul going into a MG15.
#10
AnrBjotk

Like Dave-Mc said. you can go a long way with a decent amp and modest guitar. My amp cost about Oz$1600, my favourite guitar cost Oz$65 (then I spent another $15 on some pressed steel saddles) at the local hock shop. OTOH, I don't think I could find a $1600 guitar and a $80 amp I could be happy with. That's extreme, and I was lucky with the guitar, but you get the idea.
#11
Now my heart is sinking. If a guitar, a usable one, is $4-500, that's fair, but are you saying I need to use $1600 on an amp? That's $2000...
But if we decided that a replica, or whatever, a Epiphone is do-able (and pros have used them) then what kind of amp should I look at. They seem to come in a bunch of sizes. If we say I don't need a Marshall, or one the size of a midsize car, but just a little one that produces fair sound, and used, what am I looking at spending? What are some brand names, or types? I know a little bit about guitars, but zero, zilch, bubkiss about amps.
Educate me.
#12
I'm seeing Roland Cube 30 being sold used for $120; I'm guessing that's one of the bad ones?
#13
You don't need a half stack to sound good. There are quality amps at just about every price point. There is also computer based software that has taken great strides in recent years.

What kind of music are you going to be playing? What are some famous players or tones you see yourself trying to emulate?
#14
You certainly don't have to spend as much as I did on that amp. - The first amp I liked was a Peavey Classic 30, the next was an early Fender Blues Deluxe.

The Roland Cubes have a good reputation, but I've never tried one side-by-side with my amps. This might well be unjustifiable bias,but I wouldn't spend big $ on a guitar if I couldn't afford a half-decent tube amp. A lot of it is about mojo - I don't see solidbody electrics as much more than lumps of wood that hold pickups, so I get more pleasure out of a nice amp than I would out of a fancy guitar.
#15
Quote by AnrBjotk
Now my heart is sinking. If a guitar, a usable one, is $4-500, that's fair, but are you saying I need to use $1600 on an amp? That's $2000...
But if we decided that a replica, or whatever, a Epiphone is do-able (and pros have used them) then what kind of amp should I look at. They seem to come in a bunch of sizes. If we say I don't need a Marshall, or one the size of a midsize car, but just a little one that produces fair sound, and used, what am I looking at spending? What are some brand names, or types? I know a little bit about guitars, but zero, zilch, bubkiss about amps.
Educate me.

The best place to start is what bands do you want to sound like? What kinds of sounds are the most important to you? What is your budget for this amp?
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#16
In the UK, I know I could get myself a guitar and amp that gave me a sound I was happy with for around £1000, I'm sure the US$ price wouldn't be much different.
#17
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
The best place to start is what bands do you want to sound like? What kinds of sounds are the most important to you? What is your budget for this amp?


I suppose my heroes/wanna sound likes are Bonnie 'Prince' Billy (Viva Last Blues record, for those who are aware of his indie-rock grungy masterpiece), Velvet Underground, Bob Dylan (90s, like Man in the long Black Coat, grungy), Creedence, Muddy Waters, Kings of Leon.
I play mainly fingerpicking, but I want an electric to play more rock blues stuff.
So, I showed you my fridge, tell me what guitar and amp I need
#18
AnrBjotk Ok, if I took you to a guitar store, I would probably get you to try out Les Pauls, Epiphone/ Gibson semi-hollows, and some Teles (possibly Customs first).
Then some Fender and Vox combos to run them through.
#19
Quote by luke.g.henderso
AnrBjotk Ok, if I took you to a guitar store, I would probably get you to try out Les Pauls, Epiphone/ Gibson semi-hollows, and some Teles (possibly Customs first).
Then some Fender and Vox combos to run them through.


So we're on the right track with Epiphone then, doc? What about amps?
#20
This is worth a watch:


My first thougts were an Epiphone Dot or ES-339 through a Vox AC-15C1.
On Guitar Centre's site, a new 339 and AC-15C1 is almost dead on $1000 (plus tax). It might not give you a dead-on recreation of those artists, but it should give you a good, solid base for jazz, rock, etc.

Either that or a Squier Vintage Modified Telecaster Custom with a Fender Blues Junior/ Hot Rodded Blues Junior, or maybe Bassbreaker 15. Again, not too far from $1000.
#21
Fender Blues jnr are a good little fairly cheap tube amp or the new Fender Bassbreaker.You'd only need the smallest one.What's your budget going to be?
#22
yeah absolutely, you don't have to spend $1600 or anywhere close, tony was just using that as an example

some of the cheaper tube amps would work, or even some of the cheaper modellers would be just fine- the roland cube is pretty decent but is normally aimed more at heavier stuff- something like a vox valvetronix might be a better idea for the stuff you want to play.
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#23
Quote by luke.g.henderso
This is worth a watch:


My first thougts were an Epiphone Dot or ES-339 through a Vox AC-15C1.
On Guitar Centre's site, a new 339 and AC-15C1 is almost dead on $1000 (plus tax). It might not give you a dead-on recreation of those artists, but it should give you a good, solid base for jazz, rock, etc.

Either that or a Squier Vintage Modified Telecaster Custom with a Fender Blues Junior/ Hot Rodded Blues Junior, or maybe Bassbreaker 15. Again, not too far from $1000.

The "Sound Like... Without Breaking the Bank" series is a great place to look, but if you're looking for a 60s-70s sound, I'd point you toward the videos for Hendrix, Page, and Gilmour. Here's the whole playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsW8abf8l9v0JIH5hr1a11cSofUvLKNpT
Death to Ovation haters!
#24
You can definitely find a decent workhorse guitar for about 500 bucks.
I purchased an Ibanez RG for just over 300 bucks which I've had for many years now.

A brand new epiphone (any model you like) would run you about 500,
with a used Gibson running just a bit more (500-800).

As far as getting an amp, if you're just starting out & budget is tight,
a solid state modeling amp (no more than 200) is a good way to get your chops up to speed.
Once you're confident in your ability & want to continue on with the guitar,
you can invest in a more robust option that's fine-tuned to your taste.

Or if you want to save up for all of it in one go,
lots of new tube amps can be found in the 500-1000 range.
Tube amps have become more convenient in the recent years,
dropping into a more manageable size & cost.

Whichever guitar you choose to purchase,
it's always best to check out the guitar in person & look at how it's built,
how it feels in your hand, and that sort of thing.

Of course there's also some more technical stuff you should look into to make sure you're getting a good buy,
especially if buying a used instrument.
Here's a guide you might find useful,
it's a few vital checkpoints you should look out for when making your first purchase:
https://ironageaccessories.com/blogs/guitar-tips-lessons/new-guitar-buying-tips

I hope that helps out, post a picture when you get your new axe!
#25
Quote by luke.g.henderso
This is worth a watch:


My first thougts were an Epiphone Dot or ES-339 through a Vox AC-15C1.
On Guitar Centre's site, a new 339 and AC-15C1 is almost dead on $1000 (plus tax). It might not give you a dead-on recreation of those artists, but it should give you a good, solid base for jazz, rock, etc.

Either that or a Squier Vintage Modified Telecaster Custom with a Fender Blues Junior/ Hot Rodded Blues Junior, or maybe Bassbreaker 15. Again, not too far from $1000.


Thanks!
#26
I'd get an Epiphone Les Paul 1960 Tribute Plus instead of a Gibson LP 60's Tribute.
The Tribute Plus is definitely a better bang for your buck in my opinion and costs 600 euros new. Shouldn't be that much different in the USA.
However, it would be better if you'd be able to check them out in real life instead of only going by pictures.
The Tribute+ has..
- A real maple cap like a Gibson Les Paul
- Gibson USA '57 Classic Humbuckers
- Locking Tuners (They make string changing super easy)
- Strap Locks
- A nice looking finish, especially compared to the Lower-end Gibson guitars.

Do you want to play at home in the beginning?
If you do, I'd recommend getting a guitar that you love and a modelling amp that offers a wide variety of tones. While you are learning with your practice amp, you can save money for a high quality amp and improve your skills. The Fender Mustang I V2 is a good choice in my opinion. It has a price of $120 and a lot of presets for different tones that can be adjusted to your preference. It's fun to play around with all those options.
Generally, the rule is: cheap guitar + expensive amp > Expensive guitar + Cheap amp.
However! The best equipment is the one that actually makes you play and a guitar that you love paired with a practice amp will probably motivate you more to play than a guitar that you don't like with a kickass amp.
Here are pictures of the guitar and the amp, but checking them out in person will always be the best option. The guitar is also available in other colours.


Last edited by juvion at Oct 24, 2016,
#27
Quote by EyeballPaul
Fender Blues jnr are a good little fairly cheap tube amp or the new Fender Bassbreaker.You'd only need the smallest one.What's your budget going to be?


Let's say the budget is $1000. So if it's 500 for a new Epiphone, that leaves $6-500 for an amp. But obviously, if it's possible, I'd like to go below that.

I'll probaby end up asking more on buying an amp when the time comes, but for the moment I'm more concerned with the guitar.

If we settle for an Epiphone, what models are preferable? And what's the difference between them?


Quote by Iron_Age
You can definitely find a decent workhorse guitar for about 500 bucks.
I purchased an Ibanez RG for just over 300 bucks which I've had for many years now.

A brand new epiphone (any model you like) would run you about 500,
with a used Gibson running just a bit more (500-800).

As far as getting an amp, if you're just starting out & budget is tight,
a solid state modeling amp (no more than 200) is a good way to get your chops up to speed.
Once you're confident in your ability & want to continue on with the guitar,
you can invest in a more robust option that's fine-tuned to your taste.

Or if you want to save up for all of it in one go,
lots of new tube amps can be found in the 500-1000 range.
Tube amps have become more convenient in the recent years,
dropping into a more manageable size & cost.

Whichever guitar you choose to purchase,
it's always best to check out the guitar in person & look at how it's built,
how it feels in your hand, and that sort of thing.

Of course there's also some more technical stuff you should look into to make sure you're getting a good buy,
especially if buying a used instrument.
Here's a guide you might find useful,
it's a few vital checkpoints you should look out for when making your first purchase:
https://ironageaccessories.com/blogs/guitar-tips-lessons/new-guitar-buying-tips

I hope that helps out, post a picture when you get your new axe!


Thanks!
#28
AnrBjotk, are you set on getting a new guitar? There's loads of great used stuff out there.
- Guitar(s) -
S-1 Schecter Diamond Series (Stock)
- Amps/Pedals -
Line 6 Spider IV 30w (Not ashamed) with MKII footswitch
Roland Micro Cube
- Strings -
Ernie Ball Regular 10s
#29
AnrBjotk and for an amp, for the kind of stuff you like, I could see you liking a fender bassbreaker or one of the valve vox modeling amps. On the cheaper side, sound awesome.
- Guitar(s) -
S-1 Schecter Diamond Series (Stock)
- Amps/Pedals -
Line 6 Spider IV 30w (Not ashamed) with MKII footswitch
Roland Micro Cube
- Strings -
Ernie Ball Regular 10s
#30
Quote by AnrBjotk

If we settle for an Epiphone, what models are preferable? And what's the difference between them?


If you are settled on Epiphone, and know you want to spend $400-600, you're at the point where you need to narrow it down by looks, feel, and sound. So you probably should start with looks, as that doesn't require getting hands-on. But it's probably time to head to a store.
#31
Quote by AnrBjotk
You're not raining on anything, this is why I'm asking. I'm aware of the cost of an amp, but surely no great amp can make a really bad guitar sound good either?


Great. I'm not looking to spend a lot of money if I can avoid it, not with my income. If you're saying an Epiphone does the job, then I'll start looking at epiphone. Sure, the 60's tribute looks damn good, but a "Epiphone Les Paul Standard PlusTop Pro Bourbon Burst" doesnt look too tacky. It doesn't need to lock like a million bucks, especially with my bad technique and the fact I'm only playing for myself anyway.

I'm a novice at electric. Never even touched an electric guitar. But if you're saying the Epiphone does the same job, then that's a pretty sweet deal.

So, what kind of amp should I look at then?


Actually I'd have to disagree with your statement about a great amp not being able to make a crap guitar sound great, Provided the guitar is capable of being set up correctly of course. What is impossible though is a crap amp making a great guitar sound great. So going through the other posts I noticed suggestions on a few amps, But no one seemed offer any suggestions on what makes a great amp, Sure we have our Name brand legend's Marshall, Vox, Soldano, Mesa Boogie, Fender, Peavey, Roland, Matchless, and the list goes on and on and on, And all of them had few that made it to that legendary status, But they also made a lot of turds along the way, Or at least according to those who played them, So what did all those people have in common? They all had a preference and an opinion, How did they develop that preference and opinion? They used a lot of different damn amps over the years, I have one I really like and the youngsters look at it and comment Aint that one of those cheap Chinese made amps, I'm like, they are now, but not back in the day, Mine was made in the USA, its that cheap Marshall your using that was made in China, Oh wait the head did come with Russian made Slovtek valves and the cab with British made Celestion Vintage 30's , so lets just say Made in USA with a few imported components. Meaning the logo on the grill means squat these days in many cases. And no you don't need to spend several thousand dollars for a good amp, You just need to know what your looking for and like as there's nothing wrong with 98% of the amps coming out of China today, Although I am a bit of a speaker snob, if it doesn't have at least a 12 inch speaker although more would be better its not a real guitar amp, Speakers equal range, volume and headroom. Period , Little 6, 8 and 10's just wont compete with a 12 when you get into the bottom end of things, So you seem to have fancied Gibson/Epiphone's Les Paul, Oh Sweet Jesus, Gibson has been kicking that old work horse for ages now, Wonder how many more reissues they plan to do? That poor old horse has been abused for so long now it borderlines on criminal, But don't get me wrong I love the Les Paul, I'm just not that fond of Gibson and they're way of doing business, Heck I have guitars built by Gibson's former Custom Shop chief luthier, Yea I get some flack on those too, First Act? Hey Old Guy! Buy that at WalMart? Kids have not a clue! preference doesn't always come in the form of a logo, it comes from developing it, and that requires no dollar amount, Not that they could afford a FACS , but it is a bit satisfying watching the look on they're faces once they start to figure it out, So look, here's what I'm getting at, You can look at all the pretty pictures online read all the reviews on the planet but in the end you need to play them, and don't think for a NY second that your preferences wont change over time, what you play now I can almost guarantee you wont be playing 5 or 10 years from now, maybe even less, This is a long journey and its unlikely the mules will make it to the end of it, Such is the life of mules
#32
I didn't read all the way through this.

but if you saved for a gibson for three years, i would get a gibson. You seem to have your heart set on it. if you buy something else different/cheaper, you will always wonder what it would have been like.

that is my against the grain advice.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



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#33
Quote by trashedlostfdup
I didn't read all the way through this.

but if you saved for a gibson for three years, i would get a gibson. You seem to have your heart set on it. if you buy something else different/cheaper, you will always wonder what it would have been like.

that is my against the grain advice.


I saved for a gibson because all I knew was Gibson Les Paul and Stratocasters. That's the extent of my ignorance. Now that I know a Epiphone works, and having seen about a dozen videos on youtube of Epiphones, I'm convinced. And hearing Keith Richards and others using them...
So don't mistake my singlemindedness for anything other than lack of knowledge. And my desire for a Gibson didnt take into account the cost of an amp. Ah, the folly of youth...
#34
[quote="AnrBjotk]I saved for a gibson because all I knew was Gibson Les Paul and Stratocasters. That's the extent of my ignorance. Now that I know a Epiphone works, and having seen about a dozen videos on youtube of Epiphones, I'm convinced. And hearing Keith Richards and others using them...
So don't mistake my singlemindedness for anything other than lack of knowledge. And my desire for a Gibson didnt take into account the cost of an amp. Ah, the folly of youth...



i just wanted to make you sure you didn't feel like you were settling that is all.

there is a world of guitars out there, good luck. Epi makes some decent guitars.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#35
I'm not usually one to always suggest a new amp as first priority because you do want to get a guitar that is nice to play and makes you want to pick it up and play.However lower price point guitars are much much better these days and as said above a crap amp won't make your Gibson sound any good but you can get a good comfortable guitar these days pretty cheap and an Epi or whatever you decide on will sound decent through a nicer amp.
If you can afford to buy the Epiphone Tribute with the Gibson pickups and a half decent tube amp then you'll be sweet.That guitar will be imo better than a low end Gibson.
I just did the same.I got a nice Fender Princeton amp and a couple Mexican Fender Strats and they sound great through that thing.I love one of these low end Strats more than the others in some cases more expensive i've owned in the past and feel no need to go for a US model.This is partly due to the nice amp and partly due to cheaper guitars being nicer these days.
Last edited by EyeballPaul at Oct 25, 2016,
#36
Quote by trashedlostfdup
I didn't read all the way through this.

but if you saved for a gibson for three years, i would get a gibson. You seem to have your heart set on it. if you buy something else different/cheaper, you will always wonder what it would have been like.

that is my against the grain advice.


that's a very good point, i'd tend to agree fwiw
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#37
Quote by luke.g.henderso
If you are settled on Epiphone, and know you want to spend $400-600, you're at the point where you need to narrow it down by looks, feel, and sound. So you probably should start with looks, as that doesn't require getting hands-on. But it's probably time to head to a store.


But aren't there many variations on the Epiphone Les Paul? Standard, plus, etc?
#38
Quote by AnrBjotk
But aren't there many variations on the Epiphone Les Paul? Standard, plus, etc?


Hundreds, probably. But for the most part, they are still pretty much like Les Pauls. It becomes about the finish, neck, pickups, etc. Go for an Epiphone with Gibson pickups, in your price range, that you like the look of, and feels good to play.
#39
Are you going to play for yourself or in front of a public? Because I can assure you, that you will get much better sound from guitar processor and good headphones attached to it, compared to amp which is under 100W. If you get guitar processor with USB interface, you can record very easy, or play along with your favourite band in youtube and you will hear everything mixed in real time. A guitar processor (like Line6 POD or V-Amp) will cost you under $200. When I connect my V-Amp 3 to the audio system I get much better sound, than from my 20W *good* amp - that's in case you want to share with someone at home how do you play. Especially in the low-ends, home stereos sound much better than practicing amp.
About the guitars - Epiphone, Ibanez, LTD, Jackson - you can always find great guitar for under $500. Even under $300. As someone already mentioned - today is not like before, now really decent guitar could be obtained for money a fraction of what you should pay for the same quality some 20-30 years ago.
And last point - Gibson Les Paul is Gibson Les Paul.
#40
Quote by luke.g.henderso
Hundreds, probably. But for the most part, they are still pretty much like Les Pauls. It becomes about the finish, neck, pickups, etc. Go for an Epiphone with Gibson pickups, in your price range, that you like the look of, and feels good to play.


I still haven't quite understood the Gibson/Epiphone "thing". I get that Gibson bought Epiphone and that Epiphone is a "poor man's Gibson", but how does that even work? Either it's a Gibson or a Epiphone, surely it doesn't have the same systems or set-up with poorer quality materials? Or is it just a superficial aesthetic thing?
And can I get an Epiphone with a Gibson pick-up? How does that work? (Unless it's modded, which is waaaay beyond my capabilities...)


Quote by scite
Are you going to play for yourself or in front of a public? Because I can assure you, that you will get much better sound from guitar processor and good headphones attached to it, compared to amp which is under 100W. If you get guitar processor with USB interface, you can record very easy, or play along with your favourite band in youtube and you will hear everything mixed in real time. A guitar processor (like Line6 POD or V-Amp) will cost you under $200. When I connect my V-Amp 3 to the audio system I get much better sound, than from my 20W *good* amp - that's in case you want to share with someone at home how do you play. Especially in the low-ends, home stereos sound much better than practicing amp.
About the guitars - Epiphone, Ibanez, LTD, Jackson - you can always find great guitar for under $500. Even under $300. As someone already mentioned - today is not like before, now really decent guitar could be obtained for money a fraction of what you should pay for the same quality some 20-30 years ago.
And last point - Gibson Les Paul is Gibson Les Paul.


I will play for myself, more or less. I.e. no concerts as I'm not in any band, or play professionally, nor do I ever perform for anyone - as such. However, unless buying an amp will make me bankrupt, I'd like to have one. If for nothing else than the ability to play for close friends if I feel like it, or let other people play.
I don't know how "software" amps work, but I don't trust my crummy and beat-up Mac to do such advances tasks...
And I don't have any stereo system (that might make me sound like a music philistine, but I rarely host parties and when I listen to music, which is every day, it's on my mac or iphone with headphones.)
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