#1
I was just wondering if anyone could let me know, if there is a good way for me to get my fingers not to flyoff the fretboard. Everytime I play index, ring finger, then pinky, my pinky keeps flying away from the fretboard when I go down the strings vertically. Also my middle finger sits far away from the frets when I do that fingering
Last edited by draven_rayne11 at Oct 24, 2016,
#2
relax your forearm and fingers. You shouldn't be pulling your fingers away from the fretboard, or using any muscles to keep them back. This is fundamentally an issue of finger independence.

Do you do any warms ups or basic technical workouts with a metronome? I'd recommend starting slowly with some scales or chromatic exercises, focusing on keeping the hand relaxed. When you find the trouble spot take a few minutes to go even slower and concentrate on making the movement without engaging unnecessary muscles.
#3
The best way to work on finger flyoff for me was to learn alternate picking runs across the strings.

Start at a comfortable bpm and for one drive do 124 in 16ths and alternate between triplet 16ths up and down the strings, and another drive do 134. Try to keep your fingers on the fretboard for each inactive note you've played and don't push it or create too much tension and take breaks if you feel pain. You are literally building muscle in your pinky. 134 fingerings takes longer to develop but it opens up way more possibilities for you and helps with coordination
#5
Quote by cujohnston
There's actually no muscle in your fingers. It's all tendon.


not entirely, when you move your pinky, there are tendons in your arm at play, but pinky independence comes from abductor digiti minimi and flexor digiti minimi brevis.
#6
For clarity's sake... there are muscles in your fingers, but those do not provide the bulk of the exertion you use when playing. Most of guitar playing requires very little actual strength. When you curl your fingers in, such as to press on a string, most of that motion comes from forearm.
#7
Quote by cdgraves
For clarity's sake... there are muscles in your fingers, but those do not provide the bulk of the exertion you use when playing. Most of guitar playing requires very little actual strength. When you curl your fingers in, such as to press on a string, most of that motion comes from forearm.


https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finger%23Muscles&ved=0ahUKEwjH5ZP_norQAhUCLyYKHa0oDngQygQIMDAD&usg=AFQjCNEoAcsmU0EfeJOZym6k3k5iGX6pFQ&sig2=MeMwaKUJaVjWTf9MicRMJA

There are no muscles in your fingers other than the ones that make your hair stand on end. The fingers are controlled by the muscles in your Palm and forearm.
#8
Fingers sticking way up in the air is usually a sign that you've got a lot of tension in your fretting hand. Try playing for a bit while only touching the strings so lightly that you're intentionally causing fret buzz. I bet you'll notice that you can reduce the pressure 90% and still not get any buzz. Do that for a few seconds every once in a while during your practice to remind yourself of how little muscle you need to use.

If your fingers are nice and relaxed they tend to stay where you leave them when you're not using them, and not stick out at weird angles or anything.
#9
Quote by cujohnston
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finger%23Muscles&ved=0ahUKEwjH5ZP_norQAhUCLyYKHa0oDngQygQIMDAD&usg=AFQjCNEoAcsmU0EfeJOZym6k3k5iGX6pFQ&sig2=MeMwaKUJaVjWTf9MicRMJA

There are no muscles in your fingers other than the ones that make your hair stand on end. The fingers are controlled by the muscles in your Palm and forearm.

I think you may be getting somewhat off topic there bud

Either way, I agree with what cdgraves is saying; this is almost always a problem of both tension and misunderstanding what you really need to do to have great economy of motion in the fretting hand. Relaxation is the name of the game, and only using the most minimal of muscles to fret. So that also means not actively pulling your fingers away from the fretboard, but simply relaxing when you're not using them.

That said... it's difficult to achieve, to say the least. You're going to need to practice at a speed that can really only be described as absurdly slow. Slow to the point at which you can really control what you're doing.
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#10
Zaphod_Beeblebr

Perhaps I should clarify what my train of thought was. The bottom line is that your fingers are controlled by large, relatively strong muscles and therefore it has nothing to do with finger "strength". It has everything to do with accuracy and economy of motion. You are just going to hurt yourself if you go into it with the mindset of getting your fingers "stronger".
#11
Quote by cujohnston
Zaphod_Beeblebr

Perhaps I should clarify what my train of thought was. The bottom line is that your fingers are controlled by large, relatively strong muscles and therefore it has nothing to do with finger "strength". It has everything to do with accuracy and economy of motion. You are just going to hurt yourself if you go into it with the mindset of getting your fingers "stronger".



Yes. There is practically no issue of strength per se when it comes to playing guitar. Endurance and flexibility maybe, but not strength. Consider that most of the time you're playing, you're moving a very thin wire about an 8th of an inch.