#1
I was looking at buying a Mesa Boogie Triple Rectifier amp because I love the high gain sound and power. I'm also a huge fan of heavy-sounding bands and I've heard some things that have made me lean towards buying it. I previously looked at the Peavey 6505+ but I'm concerned it may not have the big sound I'm looking for without added effects.

What are your guys' thoughts?
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#2
don't get a three channel.

really the dual recs are more than you ever need. and cheaper to change tubes because there are less.

again don't get a three channel.
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#3
The 6505 won't have any trouble whatsoever at achieving a "big" sound.

That being said, the Triple Rectifier is overkill, unless you're planning on playing in stadiums nightly. I strongly recommend going for a Dual or Single version instead. Even better if it's a 2 channel version! (The single can only be found as a 2 channel version, IIRC).
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#5
The Mesa Rectifiers (Dual and Triple) set the standard for the heaviest of the heavy, downtuned guitar sound in heavy metal musicand they both got an ungrade about ten years ago that makes them even better amplifiers than before. If that is what you are looking for, then you certainly won't be disappointed with either the Dual Rectifier or the Triple Rectifier. As for the Triple being too big; there is always the switch that drops it from 150 watts to 50 watts, so you have that option. Some have mentioned that the inside of a Triple Rectifier is a veritable forest of expensive tubes, so heaven help you when it comes time to replace them. It also weighs 48 lbs. (just the amplifier head), so you'll get quite a workout hauling it to and from your gigs. Either the Dual Rectifier or the Triple Rectifier will certainly give you that apocalyptic sound, so if you want one, go for it.
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#6
Quote by trashedlostfdup
again don't get a three channel.

What's the difference between a two and a three-channel rectifier?
Who needs shred when you've got rhythm guitar? :^)
Guitars:
Jackson King V (With a Wilde L500XL in the bridge)
Ibanez Iron Label RGIX27FEQM (7-string)
#7
Quote by adexder
What's the difference between a two and a three-channel rectifier?


other than that the two channel has two channels and the three channel has three? lol.

the three channel is fizzy and buzzy, the two channels are better across the board. check out some videos on youtube about the differences.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

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alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.


***"What Trashed Hoards"*** (updated 2016-11-27)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#9
Quote by adexder
I previously looked at the Peavey 6505+ but I'm concerned it may not have the big sound I'm looking for without added effects.

If you're concerned the Peavey 6505+ cannot be made to sound huge, then logically you'd have just as much reason to be concerned about not making a triple rec sound huge either.

It's no accident that they're super popular in the metal community. They rip.
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#10
What kind of music do you play? I had a Dual Channel Recto Rev G that was disappointing. Muddy and wouldn't cut through at all for leads without alot of help.
#11
Not sure what you are looking for exactly but by big sound don't equate watts to volume. Yes, the 150W will be marginally louder than the 100W but that volume difference should be down a bit in a comparison list.

Those extra 50W give you tighter tracking / head room and more power to reproduce the low end at decent volumes.

For the 6505 comparison, I have a Dual Rec Roadster and a 5150. The 5150 is more out of control sounding vs a more refined sounding of the Roadster.

The good news is that all 3 of the amps you're looking at are fairly common so go play them all and see what you think.

Someone above brought up the Single Rec but that's even more different. The Single Rec has only Diode rectification (but you mentioned a 6505 so I'm guessing you want "metal") which you want for tight high gain. The Dual and Triple Recs give you the option of Diode or Tube Rectification for more tonal variations. Think diode for tight riffing and tube for lead / solo work that has a little sag to it for the high gain metal world.
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#12
You definitely need to try a Dual Rec, a Triple Rec, and a 6505/5150 of some variant. They are ALL capable of flattening buildings and are equally at home in most genres of metal including extreme metal.

Having played various Dual Recs, 6505+, 5150/6505, my favorite of the bunch is the original 5150/6505.

Dual Recs, and I'm assuming TriRecs (never played one), definitely have an edge on sounding HUGE, weighty, and have tons of low-end chug capability. But in a lot of cases, that low-end gets in the way unless you cut some of it with a Tubescreamer and/or dial out some of the inherent bass. They wouldn't be my first choice of amp for super-tight, technical riffing -- but certain people have made it work.

The 5150 family of amps is definitely tighter and more middy, with a lot of grind that cuts through a mix. However, even a 6505+/5150 II which is the tightest/least bass of the family still has quite a bit of low end. They still sound huge, in other words.

The reason the original 5150/6505 is my favorite is that it definitely does have more low-end than than the newer version; almost to the level of a Dual Rec, but there is this "pissed-off mids" factor that makes it sound even more aggressive and mean than anything else I've tried. Definitely try them all before you buy, and make sure you play them through a good cab at a volume beyond "bedroom."
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#13
Quote by jgebhardt
What kind of music do you play? I had a Dual Channel Recto Rev G that was disappointing. Muddy and wouldn't cut through at all for leads without alot of help.


how did you have it dialed in? what did you have out front?

what were you expecting? i have a hard time thinking that a person couldn't cut through with a DR if set up correctly.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.


***"What Trashed Hoards"*** (updated 2016-11-27)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#14
Quote by jgebhardt
What kind of music do you play?

Heavy metal, Nu Metal (More often than not as I own a seven string). I'm looking for something that I can chug on because I'm more of a rhythm player.
Who needs shred when you've got rhythm guitar? :^)
Guitars:
Jackson King V (With a Wilde L500XL in the bridge)
Ibanez Iron Label RGIX27FEQM (7-string)
#15
trashedlostfdupHave you ever tried a Rev G two channel? Its a horrible amp compared to the newer 3 channels. I had a TubeScreamer in front with a wah and a noise gate. Thats it. The loop had a MXR 10 band and a chorus. Same setup I use for my Mark V which is light years better. Hell even my XXX was lights years better than that 2 channel.
#16
adexder

Either amp would work but your gonna get more versatility out of the Triple Rec.
#17
I like both the Dual and Triple Rectos. The main point of the Triple is more headroom and less power amp coloration of the sound due to the extra power. It is slightly louder, but just slightly. Anything over 50W of tube power is extremely loud. The big difference will be in the openness and feel of the amp. Most go with the Dual as it is cheaper to re-tube as well.

I'd definitely recommend getting one of the 2010 model year or newer as they have some tweaks that make them sound tighter in the bass and more focused upper mids which I prefer along with the multi watt switches.