#1
I play electric and acoustic, vocals and instrumentals, and I'm starting to get some solo gigs. They will typically be 3 to 4 hours with occasional breaks. I generally play "oldies" and classic rock, and have plenty of tunes. To enhance my performance, I use a setup that allows me to tightly link a drum machine and looper (some loops are pre-recorded, like "tracks", others are done live.) This allows me to have something closer to a full backup band. For example if i play an Allman Bros song and want to do one of the solos, I can cleanly switch to the next "loop" and crank away. Its a very cool setup. My only problem is that its hard enough to memorize all my lyrics, but I simply can't memorize all the "numbers" and settings I need to make between songs. This starts to add to the "dead time". I basically have to pick a song and sometimes switch guitars, set my drum machine beat and tempo, and set my looper to either a chosen track, or an empty one (I use the old Digitech Jamman, with a 99 loop memory).

Anyway, of course I keep all those "number" details in a concise song list I keep off to the side. But as much as I practice, this song setup time can add as much as 30 seconds of dead time between songs. Sometimes a little longer if I'm undecided what song to do next. I know, I know... I can reduce some of that time some by working out "sets" in advance. But I hate to do that because you have to "read" the crowd and be sensitive to what they might better enjoy ( a mellow crowd? ... more acoustic... a loud crowd, more electric blues, etc).

So all that to say, even though a complaint hasn't happened, I'm still just starting to do this, and I'm still paranoid that an owner is going to complain about my long gaps between songs. Of course to ME is seems a long time, because I'm thinking of 10 things at once. Fortunately a lot of my songs, especially where I add a few guitar solos, are long enough to make up for some of this down time. But rushing too much between songs with this kind of setup can lead to mistakes. Nothing more sucky than hitting your looper to record, only to realize you forgot to erase the loop you made in the last tune. So is 30 seconds between cover songs too much? If an owner complains, is he/she being an asshole? Thoughts?
#2
30 seconds between songs is fine, man. Radio DJs ramble on way longer than that
It was my privilege
#3
StewieSwanYeah, but radio DJs are chanting commercials, which the station is paid for. Club and restaurant owners are paying for music.
#4
30 seconds is fine, if the owner complains, they're an asshole.

If you're really worried about it though, you could still go down the pre-prepared set route. Maybe if you don't want to commit to planning the whole gig, plan little 'chunks' of songs that go well together - maybe like 4 or 5 - so at least you're then only having a 30-60 second gap every now and again as opposed to after every song.

Slightly different, but that's often how I approach my DJing sets. On the whole I'll stay flexible, but I'll have small handfuls of songs that I know go well together so I'll always mix those. Then towards the end of that chunk I'll gauge the crowd and determine whether I need to change up or just keep going.
#5
Quote by peterpanpixyland
StewieSwanYeah, but radio DJs are chanting commercials, which the station is paid for. Club and restaurant owners are paying for music.


People like a little quiet time between songs. The worst ever is when a band never stops playing and you can't even have a conversation
It was my privilege
#6
30 seconds is fine as long as it's not dead silence try to thow in a bit of banter to keep from losing the crowd.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#7
Quote by matt bickerton
30 seconds is fine, if the owner complains, they're an asshole.

If you're really worried about it though, you could still go down the pre-prepared set route. Maybe if you don't want to commit to planning the whole gig, plan little 'chunks' of songs that go well together - maybe like 4 or 5 - so at least you're then only having a 30-60 second gap every now and again as opposed to after every song.


Thats a really good idea, especially since I'll be switching between acoustic and electric occasionally.
#8
Quote by Evilnine
30 seconds is fine as long as it's not dead silence try to thow in a bit of banter to keep from losing the crowd.


Right... and that's actually the hard part! Maybe I do need to chunks of songs as little mini sets. That way I can get those setting changes better rehearsed, so I feel a more free to interact with listeners as i do it. I have no trouble interacting with listeners. I'm not shy. But needing to ignore everything to take care of my stupid settings is part of what's bothering me here.
#9
Quote by peterpanpixyland
Right... and that's actually the hard part! Maybe I do need to chunks of songs as little mini sets. That way I can get those setting changes better rehearsed, so I feel a more free to interact with listeners as i do it. I have no trouble interacting with listeners. I'm not shy. But needing to ignore everything to take care of my stupid settings is part of what's bothering me here.


Just work on making a comment or two to break the silence while setting up mutlitasking is your friend or even just a quick anecdote at the end of a song before you prepping for the next chang it up and try not to loose the crowd.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge